Question on Pros and Cons of Offshore UXD Collaboration

16 Oct 2008 - 7:10am
5 years ago
14 replies
1574 reads
Atul N Joshi
2007

Hi everyone,

Our group and I work in the area of User Experience Design in the Indian
markets. Our focus has been primarily in three areas-

1) International and Indian Products and Services offered to Indian Users

2) IT companies in India who wish to offer products and services in the
international markets but lack UXD expertise. We also help them to
institutionalize / train.

3) International UXD companies who wish to leverage on "offshoring" to an
indian partner. We focus on services that may not need direct end user
involvement in the process.

I have been privately asking the following question to some of our clients
and partners. I would appreciate your views on the same.
I have put some blunt questions here:
1) What are the top benefits that have been seen while working in
an offshore UXD partnership.
2) What are the top drawbacks.
3) What are the difficulties / benefits that a split-work scenario offer
(UXD Onshore - Development Offshore or vice versa)
4) What works / does not work and why?

I assume that there could be several types of relationships and layers. I
have mentioned 3 types in which we have worked in the past, there could be
more. Please do specify anyhting in particular about any type of
relationship you may have noticed / experienced.
Look forward to your response,
Regards,

--
Atul N Joshi
Design Director,
Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
Mumbai - India
info: www.designincuabtor.com
mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com

Comments

16 Oct 2008 - 9:35am
Dave Malouf
2005

Hi Atul,
I'm going to be straight up with you. I have not had a single
positive experience with ANY offshoring experience to date, whether
UX related or engineering related or even QA. What I have found
though is that the level of success is increased the more you can
"throw it over the wall". I.e. QA roles in engineering and
usability seem to be best suited for it.

As a USer-designer offshoring is a horrible notion because it means
jobs going away to save a buck. If you were paid something on the
order of what I was paid it was done because there wasn't enough
design resource here, I would oblige more freely, but it is almost
laways done to save a buck, and degrade payscales both in S. Asia and
in the US.

This btw, has nothing to do with the quality of work being done in
India. The issues are collaborative and cultural in nature.

UX is about communicating the abstract and abstractions often contain
too many cultural assumptions that get misinterpreted through the
imperfections of spoken and written communications that we rely upon
under tight periods. (1hr. phone calls).

I think a specific issue with UX offshoring that is intriguing is
that the UX is the face of the product and biz stakeholders want to
retain perceived control over the face of their products and services
so throwing it offshore is very difficult.

To me, you shouldn't approach this as an offshoe issue, but as an
"excellence" issue that happens to be cheaper. We work with British
design studios for example. We do so because the perceived value is in
excellence, obviously not because they are cheaper. When it comes to
UX, don't sell on "cheap" and don't call out the "offshore"
nature of it. Be the best and sell yourself as the best.

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34390

16 Oct 2008 - 10:02am
AlokJain
2006

This is a discussion close to me as I helped establish a big user
experience business practice for Satyam Computers which is a large
software engineering company with most of the business from offshore.

I agree both in philosophy and experience with Dave's points that
first and foremost it about being able to build great experiences.
The off-shoring component has to be a part of the 'solution'
building, in other words should bring advantages of multiple
locations into the solution.

In our case we identified certain tasks where we could add value by
the team in another location - for instance interacting with more
users within India which otherwise the budget did not allow, or tasks
where we can get representative users - for instance in case of
accessibility we did extensive suer testing in India. Then there are
other tasks where business context was there but much less - for
instance event management tool, and last the things that were more
repetitive like maintaining pattern library etc. We did not
participate in many award contests, but the Intranet for one of our
clients was recognized as one of the top 10 by NNGroup.

Nothing in even the above mentioned tasks was every done 100% in
another location, it was more about playing by the strengths, having
the right skills in right places, and cost was a by product. The other
significant advantage was time to market with teams working in
different timezones.

Needless to say it took a long time to establish a process that
works, but preciously because the goal was to ensure excellence as
Dave puts it.

Cheers
Alok jain

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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16 Oct 2008 - 10:12am
SemanticWill
2007

HFI has a unique model where a few (under 20) full time UX/IA resources work
on/off site with US clients to do research, define requirements and explore
some design solutions, but the bulk of the wireframing and ux design
(production) is actually done by ux/ia resouces in india - so client facing
work is done on site US UX professionals that than direct/manage a team of
production ux folks in india. I have seen a bit of the work product and it
seems relatively successful as a business model - but I don't know +/-
whether it works for their clients.

My personal experience is that it is hit or miss and requires a very large
commitment to do well. We had a Bangalore office for development based on
wireframes and IxD specs for Kayak when we first started - but that didn't
work out to well. We switched to just doing code production in our bangalore
office - and that didn't work out too well either b/c it seems to benefit
most from economies of scale and commitment to communication. In another
company we had a very successful relationship with our indian office, but it
had nothing to do with UX - that was all done in the states.

On Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 8:10 AM, Atul N Joshi <atuljoshi at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> Our group and I work in the area of User Experience Design in the Indian
> markets. Our focus has been primarily in three areas-
>
> 1) International and Indian Products and Services offered to Indian Users
>
> 2) IT companies in India who wish to offer products and services in the
> international markets but lack UXD expertise. We also help them to
> institutionalize / train.
>
> 3) International UXD companies who wish to leverage on "offshoring" to an
> indian partner. We focus on services that may not need direct end user
> involvement in the process.
>
> I have been privately asking the following question to some of our clients
> and partners. I would appreciate your views on the same.
> I have put some blunt questions here:
> 1) What are the top benefits that have been seen while working in
> an offshore UXD partnership.
> 2) What are the top drawbacks.
> 3) What are the difficulties / benefits that a split-work scenario offer
> (UXD Onshore - Development Offshore or vice versa)
> 4) What works / does not work and why?
>
> I assume that there could be several types of relationships and layers. I
> have mentioned 3 types in which we have worked in the past, there could be
> more. Please do specify anyhting in particular about any type of
> relationship you may have noticed / experienced.
> Look forward to your response,
> Regards,
>
> --
> Atul N Joshi
> Design Director,
> Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
> Mumbai - India
> info: www.designincuabtor.com
> mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill | gtalk: wkevans4
twitter: semanticwill | skype: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16 Oct 2008 - 10:23am
Scott McDaniel
2007

As kind of a tangent, this does make me wonder how many businesses are
simply outright based
in India for design and development, versus being an outsourcing
resource company featuring these skillsets.
Is there some balance of cost of being outsource resources versus
simply being their own software(etc) company?

And Atul's point made me wonder: couldn't India (or other major
outsource centers) be markets in themselves
for applications and other products which UX practice would benefit?

Scott

On Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 11:12 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com> wrote:
> HFI has a unique model where a few (under 20) full time UX/IA resources work
> on/off site with US clients to do research, define requirements and explore
> some design solutions, but the bulk of the wireframing and ux design
> (production) is actually done by ux/ia resouces in india - so client facing
> work is done on site US UX professionals that than direct/manage a team of
> production ux folks in india. I have seen a bit of the work product and it
> seems relatively successful as a business model - but I don't know +/-
> whether it works for their clients.
>
> My personal experience is that it is hit or miss and requires a very large
> commitment to do well. We had a Bangalore office for development based on
> wireframes and IxD specs for Kayak when we first started - but that didn't
> work out to well. We switched to just doing code production in our bangalore
> office - and that didn't work out too well either b/c it seems to benefit
> most from economies of scale and commitment to communication. In another
> company we had a very successful relationship with our indian office, but it
> had nothing to do with UX - that was all done in the states.
>
> On Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 8:10 AM, Atul N Joshi <atuljoshi at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hi everyone,
>>
>> Our group and I work in the area of User Experience Design in the Indian
>> markets. Our focus has been primarily in three areas-
>>
>> 1) International and Indian Products and Services offered to Indian Users
>>
>> 2) IT companies in India who wish to offer products and services in the
>> international markets but lack UXD expertise. We also help them to
>> institutionalize / train.
>>
>> 3) International UXD companies who wish to leverage on "offshoring" to an
>> indian partner. We focus on services that may not need direct end user
>> involvement in the process.
>>
>> I have been privately asking the following question to some of our clients
>> and partners. I would appreciate your views on the same.
>> I have put some blunt questions here:
>> 1) What are the top benefits that have been seen while working in
>> an offshore UXD partnership.
>> 2) What are the top drawbacks.
>> 3) What are the difficulties / benefits that a split-work scenario offer
>> (UXD Onshore - Development Offshore or vice versa)
>> 4) What works / does not work and why?
>>
>> I assume that there could be several types of relationships and layers. I
>> have mentioned 3 types in which we have worked in the past, there could be
>> more. Please do specify anyhting in particular about any type of
>> relationship you may have noticed / experienced.
>> Look forward to your response,
>> Regards,
>>
>> --
>> Atul N Joshi
>> Design Director,
>> Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
>> Mumbai - India
>> info: www.designincuabtor.com
>> mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
>
>
> --
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> aim: semanticwill | gtalk: wkevans4
> twitter: semanticwill | skype: semanticwill
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
"The future is unwritten." - Joe Strummer

16 Oct 2008 - 10:43am
Peyush Agarwal
2007

Scott,
Insofar India consumes a very small fraction of all software that's developed in India. Computing in daily life is not quite at the same level as the production in computing. Over time though, more software should be designed and written for the local market, however it will take much longer for widespread adoption of computers in place of paper.

There are many issues that need to be resolved before computing and applications in daily life can take off. Legislation is quite ignorant of the unique challenges posed by the use of computers - traditionally paper-based contracts are considered 'solid'. Until phone-based and computer-based contracts can achieve similar footing, full gains from computing will not be realized, and hence it won't be used in depth. Some other reasons are the relatively high threshold needed regarding training/education/maintenance/electricity etc. Paper/pen/pencil hardly ever fail as inefficient as they may be, and require the least from their users.

I'm sure there are other factors but it is quite interesting that India is a boldface in software production now yet it is mostly for export.

-Peyush

-----Original Message-----
From: Scott McDaniel [mailto:scott at scottopic.com]
Sent: Thursday, October 16, 2008 9:24 AM
To: Will Evans
Cc: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Question on Pros and Cons of Offshore UXD Collaboration

As kind of a tangent, this does make me wonder how many businesses are simply outright based in India for design and development, versus being an outsourcing resource company featuring these skillsets.
Is there some balance of cost of being outsource resources versus simply being their own software(etc) company?

And Atul's point made me wonder: couldn't India (or other major outsource centers) be markets in themselves for applications and other products which UX practice would benefit?

Scott

16 Oct 2008 - 1:03pm
Atul N Joshi
2007

Very interesting point of views so far.

Here are my two Paise ( 'two cents' if you please, but the difference is
1:40 ) :-)

I have three seemingly unconnected observations. Lets see if there is an
affinity insight in between those.

Personally, I like to design for Indian Users. I will tell you why. In
India, if you travel 250 Kms in any direction, from any point, everything
changes. The spoken language changes, the written script changes, the
culture changes, religion (or its interpretation) changes, FOOD changes,
water changes, people's skin color changes, economics change, weather
changes etc. To design for such diversity, every project has to be crafted.
Designing for India, trains Designers to work for alien contexts all the
time.

My second point - In India, most UXD professionals I have met either come
with a Indian college degree in Design or an American college degree in
Human Factors, the rest come from engineering and technology backgrounds and
are mostly self taught. Unlike software engineering, Interaction Design was
never a focus for most universities in India, and still isn't. I personally
feel, Designers need to publish more and Human Factors professionals need
more training in Design Principles. For the rest, some good educational
institutes like IIT Bombay and our group offer training and focus more on
"Excellence" (ref. Dave's write-up) than certification.

My third point- When I work with Indian IT companies, (most of them are
CMM-5 and ISO etc). For the size of efforts they run, I guess one has to be
extremely systematic and process driven. I find that to be a problem
sometimes, because as a Designer, I like things to more fuzzy, thresholds
more flexible and everything not so uptight! However, I refuse to buy the
argument that the IT companies in India have communication problems. I
trouble between Engineering and Design as ideologies. But I admit, I have
never met a more motley bunch of professionals with an OCD for documentation
and clear communication than the ones in Indian IT companies. If these
companies can make technology, including rocket science work, we should
certainly give it more benefit of doubt.

If all these three observations are true, then I see this affinity-

1) There still aren't Standard Formats of Communication between Designers.
For example- When I made films as a student film director in my design
school days, if I said to the film crew that "I want a 'master shot', cut to
a 'dolly' till the 'frame is tight' on the character's face"- Everyone
including the cinematographer, the actor, the editor, the sound recorder,
the grip, etc all understand. We don't really have that in our profession do
we? The problem I feel is standard vocabulary and standard deliverable
formats.

2) There are cultural gaps in making designs offshore, and huge ones. The
gaps are both ways; for designers in India to understand the context of
users, for designers outside India to understand the Software Development
context in India. But if 18th century Sociologists / Ethnographers from
Europe can understand tribal Africans and present them to the world,
19thCentury Archeologists can understand how the Neanderthals lived
and acted, I
am sure 21st Century Designers can understand the culture and needs of users
and developments team members in different parts of the world. The biggest
advantage in India (as Alok mentioned) is that Designers are very close to
where the product is actually being imagined, created, developed and built.
I think Design overall shall be better if the Designer is involved in every
detail of the product and available as part of the development team rather
than away from the team. Perhaps, Indian Designers need to spend more time
in the context of the User or International Designers need to spend more
time in context of product development. That can reduce time to act AND
improve quality of design.

3) I feel Indian Designers do not get many opportunities to publish.
Firstly, its lack of local conferences; there should be more. Secondly, it's
very expensive for them to participate in International conferences. I think
Indian Designers have a lot of opportunity to bring Design centre stage by
improving design inputs during product creation during the development
cycle. I feel the international community should support more Design
Research in India, and in turn, it will create newer opportunities for
everyone everywhere.

I feel, through collaboration, everyone makes more business because the size
of the pie is larger. Everyone improves quality of design, because Designers
are close to user data and designers are also close to product development.
This is assuming that there is enough knowledge and communication between
designers at both ends.

Regards,

--
Atul N Joshi
Design Director,
Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
Mumbai - India
info: www.designincuabtor.com
mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com

17 Oct 2008 - 12:21am
dszuc
2005

Hi:

Never liked the term "offshoring" as it implies sending something
out to be done for cheaper OR that the countries that work is being
sent to are seen as "cheap" -- When in fact there is some superb
and quality work being done in those markets whether that be India,
China, Hong Kong, Japan, Philippines (to name a few)

Perception plays a huge part.

I do suggest that there is a real benefit to conducting specific user
research activities in a local context to better inform a product
around local needs. Sometimes a piece of work can be handed to a
local UX team to do it and sometimes it needs careful management and
mentoring from a central team (based in the US or Europe etc) on what
we want to find out and how it fits into an overall strategy.

One trend we have seen is when people speak about localization they
often see it as "translation" and not willing to invest the time or
money to better understand a local market and the impacts on the
product design going forward.

rgds,
Dan

--
Daniel Szuc
Principal Usability Consultant
Apogee Usability Asia Ltd
www.apogeehk.com
Usability in Asia

The Usability Kit - www.theusabilitykit.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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17 Oct 2008 - 1:32am
Atul N Joshi
2007

A friend of mine brought to my notice that the URL to our group was
misspelled in my first mail, owing to which some couldn't get to our site.
The right URL is www.designincubator.com .

I agree with Dan and others that there is some good design work happening in
"offshore" destinations, and its not all about price anymore. In fact the
price benefit is fast diminishing. Though, the volumes of business for local
markets in emerging economies is still low, it is rapidly growing. (Some
examples of our own work are up on our site)

There are also great opportunities in some unexplored areas, for the local
markets and for the world at large.

For example, look at this traditional Indian jewelry craft called
"Meenakarii" (the art of decorating metal with enamel)-
http://www.indianetzone.com/1/meenakari.htm or
http://www.beadsworldwide.com/enamp.html.

Some years back, we tried to explore this craft form in designing mobile
phones. In India, mobile phones have been often used as a community
device and not as a personal device. During research, we realized that
Indian users tend to look at electronic devices as community products rather
than personal products. There could have been two different directions that
designers could take, and they took both. One direction we explored was-
lets make a mobile phone that is not a personal device. The other direction
that we explored was- how can a mobile phone be made into a personal
device for Indian Users. In the second direction, we came across that
Indians are very possessive about their Jewels. Jewels are completely a
personal affair (in case of women users). That is when we came across the
idea of using Meenakari on phones. Then came a very exciting question (some
may call it Strategic Design). Should these phones be made by a large multi
national and sole as very expensive "Fashion Phones" OR should a large
multi-national company make gray-box phones, priced very cheap, intended at
very large volume sales, that a local Meenakari craftsman can buy form a
shop and create his own crafts product phone from? The second approach
seemed ethically great, not only did the large, non-Indian company make
their own profits, it also provided a new area of creativity and business
opportunity to a dying craft in the country. A dying craft, that is a result
of rapid industrialization over last 50 years. (No one thinks of ill effects
of "offshoring" on India in this line of thought) .

Today, you get local glass bangles that Meenakari craftsmen buy from a
factory and then use it to decorate with their enamel. If phone
companies made a gray-box phone that could support customization by
Meenakari artisans, imagine what one could do. Imagine the diversification
of experience. Who knows, it may work well when exported to women Users
around the world. It can create jobs in western markets for imports and
resellers. And in the local markets, who can understand the local tastes and
culture of users than the craftsman who has been doing this for hundreds of
years. Isn't this UXD too? Do phone companies do research on this in India?
Not really.

I believe that a large perspective in Design and Design Processes, which was
there till the late 90s, is now lost, especially in the field of HCI. I
feel sometimes that there is some rigidity of thinking that has set in due
to unnecessary "scientific-ation" of how designs are created. It has made
understanding users much better, but has made design judgments very limited,
if not muddy. I think emerging markets present a breath of fresh
perspectives in Design. This too is a very strong side of "offshoring".

In my career as a designer, I have been lucky to work with designers from
many different countries (I used to be a Research Scholar with Fabrica,
Bentton's Communication Design Research Center in Italy). It amazes me every
time how different designers interpret the same problem differently, how
they come up with very different solutions and how they believe in very
different ideologies. I am sure that many would have had similar experiences
with exchange students when in college. Many times while doing UX projects,
I feel a lot that should have been explored through the solution space of
design has been killed under the name of "consistency", "usability" and
"standards". These words have become similes of "un-creativity" to many
designers. I think the biggest asset of working in a team made of designers
form different backgrounds is the diversity of interpretation and solutions
they can bring to table, and all that in a short time. I totally believe
that all these solutions should be usable, user friendly and ergonomic. But
just being that does not impart "experience". It may fire very well on the
behavioral , but not so much on the visceral, nor on the reflexive emotional
affect. I think "offshoring" can also be about creating newer experiences
through "multi-dimensional design". It can be more collaborative, rather
than competitive. Especially, in the solution space. It can provide more
delight to the end user.

Atul N Joshi
Design Director,
Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
Mumbai - India
Info: www.designincubator.com
Mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com

17 Oct 2008 - 9:37am
Dave Malouf
2005

Daniel,
I think there is a very big difference between hiring an
international organization to do local research/design and hiring an
organization to do work either b/c you don't internally have the
resource or because you can supplement your resources with cheaper
labor.

I interpreted the question to be the latter. How can an Indian
organization sell its services. I do agree that too many
organizations think of localization as translation, but more, too
many organizations just accept a local-centric version of their
applications as acceptable to the world. i.e. many applications
especially in the B2B space are only in english.

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34390

19 Oct 2008 - 12:43am
martinpolley
2007

I think there are two ways of looking at this. Some companies look at
offshoring simply as a way to save money. Others look at it as a way to
access a scarce resource -- brainpower.

There are a limited number of brilliant people in the world. Some come out
of Stanford. Some come out of MIT. Hence Silicon Valley and the cluster of
technology companies around Boston. But the same is true in other parts of
the world too.

Here in Israel, for example, you have a steady stream of brilliant people
coming out of the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology). And Intel,
Google, Yahoo, and others have established offices nearby so they can get a
slice of the brain pie. Wages are lower in Israel than in the US, but you
don't hear this described as offshoring.

And the same is true in India, with its seven Indian Institutes of
Technology. More brilliant brains, and the same American and international
companies lining up to snap them up.

In these cases, I don't think that the jobs are moving overseas. I think
that these big companies just want the best people, no matter where they are
located in the world. Up to now, it has mostly been programmers and
engineers. It will be interesting to see how this plays out in the coming
years with design in the ascendancy. Where will companies find all the
design talent that they will need in order to keep up?

Cheers,

--
Martin Polley
Technical writer, interaction designer
+972 52 3864280
Twitter: martinpolley
<http://capcloud.com/>

On Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 4:35 PM, David Malouf <dave at ixda.org> wrote:

> ...

> As a USer-designer offshoring is a horrible notion because it means
> jobs going away to save a buck. If you were paid something on the
> order of what I was paid it was done because there wasn't enough
> design resource here, I would oblige more freely, but it is almost
> laways done to save a buck, and degrade payscales both in S. Asia and
> in the US.
>
...
>

19 Oct 2008 - 3:18am
Atul N Joshi
2007

I agree with Martin in several different ways.
I think there is a difference between "offshoring" labour intensive work
vs.consulting services. Software development has both, however, the
headcount involved in what can be called skilled labour in software
services is very large. Software Development or the 'techie' function is
divided into Development, Architecture, QA, BA, Maintenance etc. Its
typically maintenance types of projects that require the headcounts. But,
the software indiustry in India should not be misunderstood as only that. It
may have very big volumes in business' requiring headcounts, but it is not
only limited to that.
Coming to UXD, it's a far more niche segment around the world in comparision
to the rest of software industry. In fact, most Design related fields always
have been. The largest Design companies (across Design fields) tend to be
much smaller than the smallest sized Software Devleopment companies in
India. Design, was never about numbers. In theory, I believe the same when
it comes to UXD. In India, there is a sort of a small company movement in
Design, and it has always been around since the first professionally trained
design entrepreneurs set up shop. That movement has also set in for HCI and
related Design fields. The interesitng thing is, a lot of large IT
comapanies have smaller "Excelence" or "Practice" groups unde the name of
UX, Usability or HCI etc; along side small independent UXD consulting groups
all ove rthe country. So far, these groups collaborate woith each other very
well. Our own group is a good example of such phenomenon. Many of our own
clients happen to be IT firms in India who have their own little practices
in UX and collaborate with us for advanced specialization or for training.
The nature of Design as a profession has been historically about the quality
of professionals and their work. That is why I agree with the fact that
"offshoring" in this field needs a different kind of meaning and
interpretation. It's more of a "intellectual resource collaboration".

Atul N Joshi
Design Director,
Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
Mumbai - India
Info: www.designincubator.com
Mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com

17 Oct 2008 - 1:29am
deepakd
2008

Atul,
Little did you notice that your website address is misspelled in all
your signatures in this post and also in
"http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=29449#"

"designincubator" is misspelled. Request you to correct it.

Regards,
Deepak

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34390

20 Oct 2008 - 10:01am
Atul N Joshi
2007

Hi Deepak,
I thought I had corrected the typo mistake in my mail signature.
It shows ok now, doesn't it? Thanks for bringing it to my notice.
--
Atul N Joshi
Design Director,
Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
Mumbai - India
Info: www.designincubator.com
Mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com

On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 11:59 AM, deepakd <imdeeps at gmail.com> wrote:

> Atul,
> Little did you notice that your website address is misspelled in all
> your signatures in this post and also in
> "http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=29449#"
>
> "designincubator" is misspelled. Request you to correct it.
>
>
> Regards,
> Deepak
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34390
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

20 Oct 2008 - 10:17am
SemanticWill
2007

One last point which is key is your idea of "collaboration" which hasn't
gotten enough attention. If you are designing for an offshore audience - you
need that collaboration b/c key to design research is actually doing
research - which means designers getting in front of users, interviewing
them, collaborating, testing, sketching. You can't do that from 3,000 miles
away (5,000) - and if you aren't doing real user research, you aren't doing
uxd or ucd or gcd - just d.

On Mon, Oct 20, 2008 at 11:01 AM, Atul N Joshi <atuljoshi at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi Deepak,
> I thought I had corrected the typo mistake in my mail signature.
> It shows ok now, doesn't it? Thanks for bringing it to my notice.
> --
> Atul N Joshi
> Design Director,
> Design Incubator R&D Labs (P) Ltd,
> Mumbai - India
> Info: www.designincubator.com
> Mailto: atuljoshi at gmail.com
>
>
> On Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 11:59 AM, deepakd <imdeeps at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Atul,
> > Little did you notice that your website address is misspelled in all
> > your signatures in this post and also in
> > "http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=29449#"
> >
> > "designincubator" is misspelled. Request you to correct it.
> >
> >
> > Regards,
> > Deepak
> >
> >
> > . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> > Posted from the new ixda.org
> > http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34390
> >
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill | gtalk: wkevans4
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