Needs-based paginated wizard

18 Sep 2008 - 8:16am
5 years ago
10 replies
2028 reads
John Gibbard
2008

Using http://www.starbuckscoffeeathome.com/ as an example, can anyone
point me in the direction of similar needs based selection tools?

I've seen plenty of facet-based feature selection tools (generally on
audio-visual shop sites or car sites) but this needs-based approach
really floats-my-boat.

Examples of this approach much appreciated!

John.

--
John Gibbard (User Experience Architect)
t. +44 (0)7957 102577 skype. johngibbard

Comments

18 Sep 2008 - 9:32am
Bryan J Busch
2006

Do you mean the fact that it steps you through questions in order to
refine your search? I've often seen that called a "wizard" or
"finder", such as CNET Camcorder Finder:

http://reviews.cnet.com/4247-6500_7-4.html?tag=leftColumnArea1.0

Or do you mean that it uses sliders instead of checkboxes and
dropdowns?

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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18 Sep 2008 - 9:42am
John Gibbard
2008

I mean that it's a paginated wizard (which I'm familiar with) but,
more than that, it actually addresses user needs (I like acidic
tasting coffee) vs. facet/features (I want coffee with bean type x).

J.

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18 Sep 2008 - 10:04am
Marielle Winarto
2008

Hi John,

I like the wizard, but I don't really get your point. In my barista
training, I was - quite literally - told that acidity, body, smell and
flavour are *features* of different types of coffee. (just like
colour, size and weight can be features of other objects). But
apparently, you have different associations with coffee features,
which is very interesting!

For coffee 'needs' I would think in different terms. Coffee as a
caffeine source to stay awake; coffee as a drink to accompany a meal;
coffee to enjoy (more complex taste, needs more time to drink); coffee
to discover (unusual taste, or for example extreme body), etc. Based
on customer needs, I would advise different types of coffee.

Regards,

Marielle

18 Sep 2008 - 10:13am
Sterling Koch
2008

On a side note, I haven't seen that site before and just had to say that it is one cool user experience. I loved the chalkboard metaphor and the fact that the previous steps in the wizard actually left residue on the chalkboard that you could still see in the subsequent steps. Well thought-out.

----- Original Message ----
From: John Gibbard <john at smorgasbord-design.co.uk>
To: "discuss at ixda.org list" <discuss at ixda.org>
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2008 6:16:20 AM
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Needs-based paginated wizard

Using http://www.starbuckscoffeeathome.com/ as an example, can anyone
point me in the direction of similar needs based selection tools?

I've seen plenty of facet-based feature selection tools (generally on
audio-visual shop sites or car sites) but this needs-based approach
really floats-my-boat.

Examples of this approach much appreciated!

John.

--
John Gibbard (User Experience Architect)
t. +44 (0)7957 102577 skype. johngibbard
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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18 Sep 2008 - 11:02am
John Gibbard
2008

Ok, so there's a fine line between things like 'needs',
'features' and so on. Perhaps motivations & needs is better* ...
moving away from the coffee analogy let's try IT:

Motivation: "I want to edit movies on my computer"
Need: High RAM & good graphics card

The point is that the Starbucks tool attempts - not entirely though -
to question the user's taste and likes/dislikes as opposed to
requiring the user to flick through facets such as geographical
origin, roast type etc.

Bryan's Camcorder tool does a similar thing but feels a bit more
'facety' as it refines the amount of products meeting that
criteria. It still asks 'natural' customer-orientated questions
though.

Keep the examples coming ...

John

* (I am seriously at pains to avoid another semantic debate, I think
those of us subscribed to the IAI list this week are a little
definition-weary...)

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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18 Sep 2008 - 2:20pm
netwiz
2010

On Thu, 18 Sep 2008 14:16:20 +0100, John wrote:

>Using http://www.starbuckscoffeeathome.com/ as an example, can anyone
>point me in the direction of similar needs based selection tools?
>
>I've seen plenty of facet-based feature selection tools (generally on
>audio-visual shop sites or car sites) but this needs-based approach
>really floats-my-boat.
>
>Examples of this approach much appreciated!

John, I'm not quite sure what the distinction is. This doesn't seem
really remarkable to me in approach. Here are a couple of different
approaches in travel. I'm not saying I like them or think they are
good, but they do represent different ways of getting a customer to a
product.

http://hotels.visualdna.com/statement/module/HotelsModule/Hotels_Module
http://www.expedia.co.uk/daily/inspiration/default.aspx (click on the
inspiroscope)
* Nick Gassman - Usability and Standards Manager - http://ba.com *
* I vote for reply-to to go to the list*

18 Sep 2008 - 11:53am
Kurt Krumme
2008

I think I understand what you're talking about, but in general terms
I think it's just a task based rather than hierarchical navigation.

Using your example of a car site, you would ask, "Do you want great
handling or durability?" instead of asking "Do you want Pirelli
Tires or Goodyear All Season radials?" (note: I actually know
nothing about tires).

IMO, unless your users are expected to be proficient in the subject
matter, task-based is usually the superior choice.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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18 Sep 2008 - 5:22pm
John Gibbard
2008

I'm not suggesting the approach is groundbreaking or anything that we
don't already do when working through personas and task flows but
what is novel - and this is indicated by the distinct paucity of
comparable examples - is the execution of this natural-questioning
approach.

As Marielle alluded to in her response this echoes the real-life
barrista in their interrogation of the customer's likes and dislikes
- their high-level motivations.

Nick's example is equally novel but not quite as cleanly executed.
The user's decisions aren't quite as straightforward when the
pictures are so ambiguous. Granted, this isn't a simple polarised
choice environment; choosing a holiday is a bit more involved than an
Americano. Yet this doesn't exactly meet the Krug criteria, IMHO.

More examples if you've got 'em...

J.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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18 Sep 2008 - 3:12pm
Gino Rodrigues
2008
18 Sep 2008 - 1:59pm
Tim Wright
2008

I'd take that motivation up a level!

User goal: to make a movie about their daughter's 5th birthday and not feel
stupid when doing it :)
Need: upload and edit movies on computer
Technological requirement: lots of RAM, fast and big HD, good graphics card.

Tim

On Fri, Sep 19, 2008 at 4:02 AM, John Gibbard <john at smorgasbord-design.co.uk
> wrote:

> Ok, so there's a fine line between things like 'needs',
> 'features' and so on. Perhaps motivations & needs is better* ...
> moving away from the coffee analogy let's try IT:
>
> Motivation: "I want to edit movies on my computer"
> Need: High RAM & good graphics card
>
> The point is that the Starbucks tool attempts - not entirely though -
> to question the user's taste and likes/dislikes as opposed to
> requiring the user to flick through facets such as geographical
> origin, roast type etc.
>
> Bryan's Camcorder tool does a similar thing but feels a bit more
> 'facety' as it refines the amount of products meeting that
> criteria. It still asks 'natural' customer-orientated questions
> though.
>
> Keep the examples coming ...
>
> John
>
>
> * (I am seriously at pains to avoid another semantic debate, I think
> those of us subscribed to the IAI list this week are a little
> definition-weary...)
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=33112
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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