An alternative phrase to "Buy Now"?

23 Jun 2008 - 4:32am
5 years ago
13 replies
1637 reads
andrea
2006

Hi -

I am currently working on a website for a client in the
'spiritual/healing/meditation" space and she has a playful, whimsical
yet vibrant, interactive website with "guided journeys" that unfold
insight to one's personal development through a game-like interface
where one choses tokens and is able to enter various rooms,
environments, etc.

The site has about 30k+ registered users, more than half of whom are
active each month, with 1/3 of them returning daily and an equal
amount spending 20+ minutes on the site with each visit. So, plenty
of active users and deep users. Nearly all are female and over 30
years old.

Currently, the site offers "free audio meditation" one can listen to
on the site. The new plan (and part of my assignment as a project
manager) is to lead a remote development team in the construction of
the e-commerce store to sell the audio downloads (and eventually,
video downloads of similar content).

So far in the RFP, we have been using the term "Buy Now" as the button
to be included in the site, but the owner and I agree that such
terminology and any "big, red blinking button" would be in disharmony
with the site.

Any suggestions or experience on another term or action oriented
phrase that could be used besides "BUY NOW"?

My major concern is confusing an already accustomed audience by
introducing a new phrase that is unclear in its direction. So, how do
we tell the user she can "buy now" without using such a commercial and
trite phrase?

A few I have considered:
"Add to Cart" - works because it is a familiar directive, but also
seems disharmonious with the site look and feel.
"Select Item" - might work, feels less purchase oriented and a bit bland...
"Own It!' - clear directive, but feels a bit too powerful for a
gentler, meditation oriented product...

I will be thinking about this fantastic and clever button all day as I
work on the basic wire-frames for the store - I would appreciate any
help and/or suggestions if you have a moment to lend some brainwaves
to this one or if you have encountered a similar issue.

thanks to all!
AL

ps - I did search past threads and found the following -
http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=19036 - and it was very
insightful as well...

Comments

23 Jun 2008 - 7:37am
Bryan J Busch
2006

As a consumer, I would prefer that a button which leads to a financial
transaction be very clear about it as soon as possible, so including
words like "Buy" or "Purchase" or "Cart" is very helpful, but
just to play along:

If the only things to be bought on the site are audio and video, how
about "Download for Later" or "Save to My Computer" or some
variation thereof?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30567

23 Jun 2008 - 5:26am
Anonymous

Hi ya I don't know what would be a good example in relation to the website, but a lot of websites (clothing ones especially) have lost the idea of a basket or cart and are now using a shopping bag, e.g. http://www.lasenza.co.uk which relates a lot more to the real world experience and is a nice touch.

You could think of something relating to the content that fits. The website sounds very unique so perhaps make purchasing on it a bit special for people too. Maybe give them a sense that they're creating their own unique package/gift to themselves throughout the whole purchasing process. E.g. Give yourself the gift of Meditation, Add to your gift basket, Create my gift package, a order review screen with a summary of your gift using effective images.

Not perfect examples but I hope you get the gist of it.

Joanne Richardson
User Experience

Email joanne.richardson at think.eu
Telephone +44 (0)191 241 7000
Mobile +44 (0)773 816 9085
Facsimile +44 (0)191 241 7002
Website www.think.eu

Think Limited. Registered Office: 55 Degrees North, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6BF
Registered in England No: 4573723

Unless stated to be non-confidential, this email and any attachments are private and confidential and are for addressee only. If you have received this email in error please contact us upon receipt. Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, except where the message states otherwise and the sender is authorised to state them to be the views of Think Limited.

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Andrea Lewis
Sent: 23 June 2008 10:32
To: discuss at ixdg.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] An alternative phrase to "Buy Now"?

Hi -

I am currently working on a website for a client in the
'spiritual/healing/meditation" space and she has a playful, whimsical
yet vibrant, interactive website with "guided journeys" that unfold
insight to one's personal development through a game-like interface
where one choses tokens and is able to enter various rooms,
environments, etc.

The site has about 30k+ registered users, more than half of whom are
active each month, with 1/3 of them returning daily and an equal
amount spending 20+ minutes on the site with each visit. So, plenty
of active users and deep users. Nearly all are female and over 30
years old.

Currently, the site offers "free audio meditation" one can listen to
on the site. The new plan (and part of my assignment as a project
manager) is to lead a remote development team in the construction of
the e-commerce store to sell the audio downloads (and eventually,
video downloads of similar content).

So far in the RFP, we have been using the term "Buy Now" as the button
to be included in the site, but the owner and I agree that such
terminology and any "big, red blinking button" would be in disharmony
with the site.

Any suggestions or experience on another term or action oriented
phrase that could be used besides "BUY NOW"?

My major concern is confusing an already accustomed audience by
introducing a new phrase that is unclear in its direction. So, how do
we tell the user she can "buy now" without using such a commercial and
trite phrase?

A few I have considered:
"Add to Cart" - works because it is a familiar directive, but also
seems disharmonious with the site look and feel.
"Select Item" - might work, feels less purchase oriented and a bit bland...
"Own It!' - clear directive, but feels a bit too powerful for a
gentler, meditation oriented product...

I will be thinking about this fantastic and clever button all day as I
work on the basic wire-frames for the store - I would appreciate any
help and/or suggestions if you have a moment to lend some brainwaves
to this one or if you have encountered a similar issue.

thanks to all!
AL

ps - I did search past threads and found the following -
http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=19036 - and it was very
insightful as well...
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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23 Jun 2008 - 8:42am
Laura Francis
2008

Hi Joanne

Interesting point about relating to the real world however, I'd argue
that if you go shopping you normally have a basket (or trolley in the
UK, cart in the US if its a big shop) and add things to that. Its only
after you pay that you get a shopping bag.

I also find the idea of 'giving yourself a gift' a bit contrived and
slightly patronising.

Laura

On Mon, Jun 23, 2008 at 11:26 AM, Joanne Richardson
<joanne.richardson at think.eu> wrote:
> Hi ya I don't know what would be a good example in relation to the website, but a lot of websites (clothing ones especially) have lost the idea of a basket or cart and are now using a shopping bag, e.g. http://www.lasenza.co.uk which relates a lot more to the real world experience and is a nice touch.
>
> You could think of something relating to the content that fits. The website sounds very unique so perhaps make purchasing on it a bit special for people too. Maybe give them a sense that they're creating their own unique package/gift to themselves throughout the whole purchasing process. E.g. Give yourself the gift of Meditation, Add to your gift basket, Create my gift package, a order review screen with a summary of your gift using effective images.
>
> Not perfect examples but I hope you get the gist of it.
>
> Joanne Richardson
> User Experience
>
> Email joanne.richardson at think.eu
> Telephone +44 (0)191 241 7000
> Mobile +44 (0)773 816 9085
> Facsimile +44 (0)191 241 7002
> Website www.think.eu
>
> Think Limited. Registered Office: 55 Degrees North, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6BF
> Registered in England No: 4573723
>
> Unless stated to be non-confidential, this email and any attachments are private and confidential and are for addressee only. If you have received this email in error please contact us upon receipt. Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, except where the message states otherwise and the sender is authorised to state them to be the views of Think Limited.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Andrea Lewis
> Sent: 23 June 2008 10:32
> To: discuss at ixdg.org
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] An alternative phrase to "Buy Now"?
>
> Hi -
>
> I am currently working on a website for a client in the
> 'spiritual/healing/meditation" space and she has a playful, whimsical
> yet vibrant, interactive website with "guided journeys" that unfold
> insight to one's personal development through a game-like interface
> where one choses tokens and is able to enter various rooms,
> environments, etc.
>
> The site has about 30k+ registered users, more than half of whom are
> active each month, with 1/3 of them returning daily and an equal
> amount spending 20+ minutes on the site with each visit. So, plenty
> of active users and deep users. Nearly all are female and over 30
> years old.
>
> Currently, the site offers "free audio meditation" one can listen to
> on the site. The new plan (and part of my assignment as a project
> manager) is to lead a remote development team in the construction of
> the e-commerce store to sell the audio downloads (and eventually,
> video downloads of similar content).
>
> So far in the RFP, we have been using the term "Buy Now" as the button
> to be included in the site, but the owner and I agree that such
> terminology and any "big, red blinking button" would be in disharmony
> with the site.
>
> Any suggestions or experience on another term or action oriented
> phrase that could be used besides "BUY NOW"?
>
> My major concern is confusing an already accustomed audience by
> introducing a new phrase that is unclear in its direction. So, how do
> we tell the user she can "buy now" without using such a commercial and
> trite phrase?
>
> A few I have considered:
> "Add to Cart" - works because it is a familiar directive, but also
> seems disharmonious with the site look and feel.
> "Select Item" - might work, feels less purchase oriented and a bit bland...
> "Own It!' - clear directive, but feels a bit too powerful for a
> gentler, meditation oriented product...
>
> I will be thinking about this fantastic and clever button all day as I
> work on the basic wire-frames for the store - I would appreciate any
> help and/or suggestions if you have a moment to lend some brainwaves
> to this one or if you have encountered a similar issue.
>
> thanks to all!
> AL
>
> ps - I did search past threads and found the following -
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=19036 - and it was very
> insightful as well...
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

23 Jun 2008 - 10:01am
Christine Boese
2006

How about "Invite the Product to Come to You"?

Just adding a little zen to the purchasing flow... <G>

Chris

On Mon, Jun 23, 2008 at 5:32 AM, Andrea Lewis <helloandrea at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi -
>
> I am currently working on a website for a client in the
> 'spiritual/healing/meditation" space and she has a playful, whimsical
> yet vibrant, interactive website with "guided journeys" that unfold
> insight to one's personal development through a game-like interface
> where one choses tokens and is able to enter various rooms,
> environments, etc.
>
> The site has about 30k+ registered users, more than half of whom are
> active each month, with 1/3 of them returning daily and an equal
> amount spending 20+ minutes on the site with each visit. So, plenty
> of active users and deep users. Nearly all are female and over 30
> years old.
>
> Currently, the site offers "free audio meditation" one can listen to
> on the site. The new plan (and part of my assignment as a project
> manager) is to lead a remote development team in the construction of
> the e-commerce store to sell the audio downloads (and eventually,
> video downloads of similar content).
>
> So far in the RFP, we have been using the term "Buy Now" as the button
> to be included in the site, but the owner and I agree that such
> terminology and any "big, red blinking button" would be in disharmony
> with the site.
>
> Any suggestions or experience on another term or action oriented
> phrase that could be used besides "BUY NOW"?
>
> My major concern is confusing an already accustomed audience by
> introducing a new phrase that is unclear in its direction. So, how do
> we tell the user she can "buy now" without using such a commercial and
> trite phrase?
>
> A few I have considered:
> "Add to Cart" - works because it is a familiar directive, but also
> seems disharmonious with the site look and feel.
> "Select Item" - might work, feels less purchase oriented and a bit bland...
> "Own It!' - clear directive, but feels a bit too powerful for a
> gentler, meditation oriented product...
>
> I will be thinking about this fantastic and clever button all day as I
> work on the basic wire-frames for the store - I would appreciate any
> help and/or suggestions if you have a moment to lend some brainwaves
> to this one or if you have encountered a similar issue.
>
> thanks to all!
> AL
>
> ps - I did search past threads and found the following -
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=19036 - and it was very
> insightful as well...
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

23 Jun 2008 - 9:35am
Anonymous

Hi Laura, actually never thought about that, your right you don%u2019t
get a shopping bag till the end, the way I was see the 'shopping
bag' was as something your creating, your adding things to it to
take away. Very good point.

I've been thinking about the offline/online shopping experience
recently and I was just trying to think of a way that you can get the
same little details online that make you feel good in the outside
world. You go to fancy shops and it's all about treating yourself to
a nice product which gets gift wrapped all perfectly in front of you,
your receipt gets put in a little envelope and to finish it off you
have the bag to carry round and it all feels a bit special.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30567

23 Jun 2008 - 10:39am
Pat Barford
2007

Following Christine's line of thought, what about 'Manifest now.'

Pat Barford M.Ed
pbarford at epcor.ca

This email contains confidential information that is proprietary to EPCOR and its subsidiary companies in all respects. This information is intended only for the person(s) named in the destination address. Unauthorized distribution, copying or disclosure is strictly prohibited. If you receive this e-mail in error please delete it immediately.

23 Jun 2008 - 11:38am
Dennis Williams
2008

I've been in a similar situation, the danger being that using a word
that people are not accustomed to will lead to confusion of what it
is they are going to do - and may lead them not to click on it
resulting in less sales (e commerce seems to be iffy that way)...but;
a quick synonym search brings back: acquire, purchase, procure,
obtain or get - and that was in outlook - so sure there's others -
and personally I think they all sound less harsh/capitalistic than
BUY NOW! maybe not zen - but softer. but - when all else fails - do
a quick and dirty test - see what a couple of users prefer and can
relate to - you can even put it to your loyal large following... my 2
cents.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30567

23 Jun 2008 - 11:33am
Frank Siraguso
2008

I agree with Bryan that the button should be clear, and agree with Laura
that "gifting yourself" is too contrived. How about "Order Now" or
"Place Order" - that may seem a little less money-grubbing than the
blatant-but-clear "Buy Now!". Even those seeking the clear light desire
clear direction. Just my tuppence's worth.

Frank Siraguso

23 Jun 2008 - 12:49pm
Rony Philip
2007

Hi Christine,

Here are a few more - Purchase Item, Procure Item, or even Acquire Item

Rony

On 6/23/08, Christine Boese <christine.boese at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> How about "Invite the Product to Come to You"?
>
> Just adding a little zen to the purchasing flow... <G>
>
> Chris
>
> On Mon, Jun 23, 2008 at 5:32 AM, Andrea Lewis <helloandrea at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi -
> >
> > I am currently working on a website for a client in the
> > 'spiritual/healing/meditation" space and she has a playful, whimsical
> > yet vibrant, interactive website with "guided journeys" that unfold
> > insight to one's personal development through a game-like interface
> > where one choses tokens and is able to enter various rooms,
> > environments, etc.
> >
> > The site has about 30k+ registered users, more than half of whom are
> > active each month, with 1/3 of them returning daily and an equal
> > amount spending 20+ minutes on the site with each visit. So, plenty
> > of active users and deep users. Nearly all are female and over 30
> > years old.
> >
> > Currently, the site offers "free audio meditation" one can listen to
> > on the site. The new plan (and part of my assignment as a project
> > manager) is to lead a remote development team in the construction of
> > the e-commerce store to sell the audio downloads (and eventually,
> > video downloads of similar content).
> >
> > So far in the RFP, we have been using the term "Buy Now" as the button
> > to be included in the site, but the owner and I agree that such
> > terminology and any "big, red blinking button" would be in disharmony
> > with the site.
> >
> > Any suggestions or experience on another term or action oriented
> > phrase that could be used besides "BUY NOW"?
> >
> > My major concern is confusing an already accustomed audience by
> > introducing a new phrase that is unclear in its direction. So, how do
> > we tell the user she can "buy now" without using such a commercial and
> > trite phrase?
> >
> > A few I have considered:
> > "Add to Cart" - works because it is a familiar directive, but also
> > seems disharmonious with the site look and feel.
> > "Select Item" - might work, feels less purchase oriented and a bit
> bland...
> > "Own It!' - clear directive, but feels a bit too powerful for a
> > gentler, meditation oriented product...
> >
> > I will be thinking about this fantastic and clever button all day as I
> > work on the basic wire-frames for the store - I would appreciate any
> > help and/or suggestions if you have a moment to lend some brainwaves
> > to this one or if you have encountered a similar issue.
> >
> > thanks to all!
> > AL
> >
> > ps - I did search past threads and found the following -
> > http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=19036 - and it was very
> > insightful as well...
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

23 Jun 2008 - 12:57pm
andrea
2006

Thanks all, have been reading and will continue to read... All very
helpful and insightful.

I really like the idea of the BASKET that works better symbolically
for shopping than a "cart" for a site like this.... Joanne, I really
appreciate your kicking off the conversation in that direction.

As for the terminology, I will present a few terms and see what
consensus we can find internally --- luckily, we do have a loyal site
membership and a few active users who are open to "polling" before we
make major changes to the community, I will pose the question there,
with a keen eye on simplicity and conveying a sense of security in the
transaction... (thanks to both Bryan's).

Patricia and Christine - definitely think your suggestions are helpful
as it reminds me to use consistent terminology on this particular area
of the site. and, thanks to Frank and Laura for keeping the site
soulful and honest to the greater mission!

cheers,
Andrea

On Mon, Jun 23, 2008 at 1:49 PM, Rony Philip <philiprony at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Christine,
>
> Here are a few more - Purchase Item, Procure Item, or even Acquire Item
>
> Rony
>
> On 6/23/08, Christine Boese <christine.boese at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> How about "Invite the Product to Come to You"?
>>
>> Just adding a little zen to the purchasing flow... <G>
>>
>> Chris
>>
>> On Mon, Jun 23, 2008 at 5:32 AM, Andrea Lewis <helloandrea at gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > Hi -
>> >
>> > I am currently working on a website for a client in the
>> > 'spiritual/healing/meditation" space and she has a playful, whimsical
>> > yet vibrant, interactive website with "guided journeys" that unfold
>> > insight to one's personal development through a game-like interface
>> > where one choses tokens and is able to enter various rooms,
>> > environments, etc.
>> >
>> > The site has about 30k+ registered users, more than half of whom are
>> > active each month, with 1/3 of them returning daily and an equal
>> > amount spending 20+ minutes on the site with each visit. So, plenty
>> > of active users and deep users. Nearly all are female and over 30
>> > years old.
>> >
>> > Currently, the site offers "free audio meditation" one can listen to
>> > on the site. The new plan (and part of my assignment as a project
>> > manager) is to lead a remote development team in the construction of
>> > the e-commerce store to sell the audio downloads (and eventually,
>> > video downloads of similar content).
>> >
>> > So far in the RFP, we have been using the term "Buy Now" as the button
>> > to be included in the site, but the owner and I agree that such
>> > terminology and any "big, red blinking button" would be in disharmony
>> > with the site.
>> >
>> > Any suggestions or experience on another term or action oriented
>> > phrase that could be used besides "BUY NOW"?
>> >
>> > My major concern is confusing an already accustomed audience by
>> > introducing a new phrase that is unclear in its direction. So, how do
>> > we tell the user she can "buy now" without using such a commercial and
>> > trite phrase?
>> >
>> > A few I have considered:
>> > "Add to Cart" - works because it is a familiar directive, but also
>> > seems disharmonious with the site look and feel.
>> > "Select Item" - might work, feels less purchase oriented and a bit
>> > bland...
>> > "Own It!' - clear directive, but feels a bit too powerful for a
>> > gentler, meditation oriented product...
>> >
>> > I will be thinking about this fantastic and clever button all day as I
>> > work on the basic wire-frames for the store - I would appreciate any
>> > help and/or suggestions if you have a moment to lend some brainwaves
>> > to this one or if you have encountered a similar issue.
>> >
>> > thanks to all!
>> > AL
>> >
>> > ps - I did search past threads and found the following -
>> > http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=19036 - and it was very
>> > insightful as well...
>> > ________________________________________________________________
>> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>> >
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>

23 Jun 2008 - 1:12pm
Angel Marquez
2008
24 Jun 2008 - 8:05am
gabefriedman
2007

If it's not too late to chime in, :

%u2022 "basket" sounds like a good term for this add audience:
"add to basket"

%u2022 as important as the actual phrase might be some hand-holding
during the first few weeks after rolling out the buy function; t
letting your audience know that:

* you can now buy things
* the rationale (user demand? 10% to the planet? shameless greed?)
behind the change

Also, pay close attention to the aesthetics of the cart/checkoiut
process, with helpful signposts, good forms, etc...All that will end
up being more important than the wording on the actual button, which
will quickly be ignored.

There are plenty of sites - etsy, threadless, etc... - that combine
commerce with a sense of play, whimsy etc... without sacrificing good
user experience.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30567

24 Jun 2008 - 8:19am
AJ Kock
2007

How about "Get it"? - Informal and to the point.

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