Sketching as a Wireframing Tool

19 Jun 2008 - 10:21am
5 years ago
25 replies
1461 reads
Mike Rohde
2008

Hello IXDA people,

I'm new to this list but am enjoying the conversations and topics. Thanks
for sharing your expertise everyone!

I'm wondering how many, if any of you use pencil/pen and paper to work out
wireframes? I've used several different methods and prefer sketching when I
am able to do it, because it's quick and works well for me.

We've also found that with clients, the openness and loose nature of pencil
sketches helps clients feel the process is still flexible and sketches seem
to help them focus on structure rather than getting hung up on position only
text, typos and so on.

Does anyone else use sketches in their workflow, either for internal use or
sharing with clients? I'm curious.

Here's a post from a while ago on my personal blog about sketching:

http://www.rohdesign.com/weblog/archives/001852.html

P.S. I also like Fireworks for wireframes and mockups, because of my history
as a vector guy who loves Illustrator. :-)

Thanks again for this list!

Mike

--
Mike Rohde | Interactive Art Director
Northwoods Software | http://northwoodsoft.com
mike.rohde at northwoodsoft.com | (414) 434-8252

Comments

19 Jun 2008 - 10:42pm
Steve Schang
2008

I use sketches to get my ideas written down. Once I feel good about the
sketches I start working with a program on the computer. I find it easier
to explore ideas if I am not staring at a blank monitor.

-steve

Mike Rohde <mike.rohde at northwoodsoft.com>
Sent by: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
06/19/2008 11:21 AM

To
<discuss at ixda.org>
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Subject
[IxDA Discuss] Sketching as a Wireframing Tool

Hello IXDA people,

I'm new to this list but am enjoying the conversations and topics. Thanks
for sharing your expertise everyone!

I'm wondering how many, if any of you use pencil/pen and paper to work out
wireframes? I've used several different methods and prefer sketching when
I
am able to do it, because it's quick and works well for me.

We've also found that with clients, the openness and loose nature of
pencil
sketches helps clients feel the process is still flexible and sketches
seem
to help them focus on structure rather than getting hung up on position
only
text, typos and so on.

Does anyone else use sketches in their workflow, either for internal use
or
sharing with clients? I'm curious.

Here's a post from a while ago on my personal blog about sketching:

http://www.rohdesign.com/weblog/archives/001852.html

P.S. I also like Fireworks for wireframes and mockups, because of my
history
as a vector guy who loves Illustrator. :-)

Thanks again for this list!

Mike

--
Mike Rohde | Interactive Art Director
Northwoods Software | http://northwoodsoft.com
mike.rohde at northwoodsoft.com | (414) 434-8252

________________________________________________________________
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19 Jun 2008 - 11:14pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Mike,

I create pencil sketches instead of wireframes. That is, I do not
create wireframes at all, and I use sketches for all of the purposes
others use wireframes.

Jack

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 19, 2008, at 11:21 AM, Mike Rohde
<mike.rohde at northwoodsoft.com> wrote:
>
> Does anyone else use sketches in their workflow, either for internal
> use or
> sharing with clients? I'm curious.

20 Jun 2008 - 1:34am
Uday Gajendar
2007

Yep, I'd second that as well. Sketching (non-digital: pen/pencil/
whiteboard/paper) has often been my first and preferred tool of choice
for wireframing--laying out elements and exploring compositional
studies of screens/elements--both personally and collaboratively. The
speed, fluidity, dexterity, and breadth of conversation with an
engineer or product manager is magnified by sketching it out first.
It's amazing how much problem identifying and solving you can do at
that level alone! Not to mention generating the volume of layout
possibilities...

Then I use digital production tools (like Visio, Fireworks, etc.)
primarily for professional polished presentations and nice final
deliverables for clients or corporate review committees (and my
portfolio :-)

Hope that helps...

Uday Gajendar
Sr. Interaction Designer
Voice Technology Group
Cisco | San Jose

On Jun 19, 2008, at 9:14 PM, Jack Leon Moffett wrote:
>
> I create pencil sketches instead of wireframes. That is, I do not
> create wireframes at all, and I use sketches for all of the purposes
> others use wireframes.
>
> On Jun 19, 2008, at 11:21 AM, Mike Rohde
> <mike.rohde at northwoodsoft.com> wrote:
>>
>> Does anyone else use sketches in their workflow, either for
>> internal use or
>>

20 Jun 2008 - 6:38am
Adam Connor
2007

I always sketch first, and depending on the size of the project and
number of people involved, I do it collaboratively with other members
of the project team.

The sketches last for a while and go through a few iterations, but
typically, more formal, digital wireframes are created from them.
This tends to be more for documentation than design purposes though,
as the wireframes end up linked to from business requirements
documents and technical specifications over the life of the project.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30390

20 Jun 2008 - 6:42am
Dave Malouf
2005

Just posted a blog post on sketching myself just last night. In it
I'm trying to distinguish between "sketching" and "drawing" and
talk about "sketching" specifically as a design tool.

But to me the importance of "lead/ink to paper/wall" is less
important than the intentionality. Not everyone has equal craft
skills when it comes to this mode of working. What is most important
is taking the time or adding to your existing process the non-linear
multiplicity of ideas--the real separation of creation from judgment.

Here's the link (be warned, it has home work):
http://synapticburn.com/more.php?id=288_0_1_0_C

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Jun 2008 - 6:57am
Dave Malouf
2005

Speaking of sketching. A List Apart (a great Web Design Blog) has a
piece on prototypes ("Sketching in code") ... Here is the article:
http://alistapart.com/articles/sketchingincode/
Here is my response:
http://alistapart.com/comments/sketchingincode?page=2#18

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20 Jun 2008 - 7:13am
Benjamin Ho
2007

Whiteboard and marker. Then straight to Axure.

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20 Jun 2008 - 7:59am
bekee
2008

i tend toward graph paper and my sharpie first. that way, i can draw
out some screens and go over them with other people before committing
to a flow that could very well change; and the tools i'm allowed to
work with (at work) leave a lot to be desired; which could end up
costing me a lot of time.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Jun 2008 - 8:24am
John Gibbard
2008

> Does anyone else use sketches in their workflow,
> either for internal use or sharing with clients?
> I'm curious. Here's a post from a while ago on my personal
> blog about sketching:

Mike, I've admired your sketches since seeing your Flickr set of
moleskine sketches from SEED 3, an inspiring quality of notemaking
and great audit-trail of thought processes. If my wireframe sketches
were half as good as yours I'd have them included in client
presentations for sure. However, they're not, so I tend to get my
boxes, arrows and flows all resolved on a Visio document instead.

A great thread this, thanks for all the links and inspiration people.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Jun 2008 - 8:25am
jo frudd
2008

Like you Mike I am a great believer in pen and paper.

Sketching ideas out on paper is a much more creative process than
sitting in front of a screen alone. It helps you as the designer
play around with many more concepts, which you can then refine down
to an agreed approach and its simply more fun.

I have also had great success with getting developers involved in the
design process in this way as it does not rely on knowing any software
and having a license, so is much more accessible.

I have wall space for all my projects, which contains business
objectives and metrics, personas, user stories and user flows, so
once we start sketching we fill the wall, so we are surrounded by our
ideas instead of keeping them locked in files on a server.

I also take photos of the sketches, and upload to basecamp so we have
a record of our thoughts processes. Then I take the photo straight
into Photoshop to start designing, without having to begin with a
blank white screen.

We then build production quality code. I only ever use visio now,
for offshore 3rd party deliverables where unfortunately we still have
to use the functional spec waterfall method :(

Like you, my clients seem to really like this quick, cheap and
flexible approach.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Jun 2008 - 8:28am
Bryan J Busch
2006

Paper refuses to stretch for me, either horizontally or vertically, in
the way that Web browsers do. I suppose if there's a particular piece
of an interface that you're imagining, and want to show someone,
paper is okay. But not an entire page.

My practical answer is that I am much faster using a computerized
tool to mock something up. And if I'm mocking something up with
HTML, then I end up with something that can be used in future phases.

Also, pencils have an unfortunate smell about them. But that might
just be me.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Jun 2008 - 8:32am
Bryan J Busch
2006

Also, if you have the option of avoiding paper, I think it's the
environmentally responsible thing to do.

And if you're showing your sketch to someone who isn't in the
office with you, you'll probably use a scanner or fax machine, which
is more energy and paper wasted.

Bah. Paper.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Jun 2008 - 8:57am
martinpolley
2007

Hi Dave,

Does what you're designing (and its constraints) affect the number of
different ideas you sketch? I'm thinking that if you were trying to come up
with different ideas for the layout of a simple form, you would probably
sketch fewer ideas than if you were trying to come up with different ideas
for the layout (etc.) of an entire application.

Cheers,
--
Martin Polley
Technical writer, interaction designer
+972 52 3864280
<http://capcloud.com/>

On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 2:42 PM, dave malouf <dave.ixd at gmail.com> wrote:

> Just posted a blog post on sketching myself just last night. In it
> I'm trying to distinguish between "sketching" and "drawing" and
> talk about "sketching" specifically as a design tool.
>
> But to me the importance of "lead/ink to paper/wall" is less
> important than the intentionality. Not everyone has equal craft
> skills when it comes to this mode of working. What is most important
> is taking the time or adding to your existing process the non-linear
> multiplicity of ideas--the real separation of creation from judgment.
>
>
> Here's the link (be warned, it has home work):
> http://synapticburn.com/more.php?id=288_0_1_0_C
>
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30390
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

20 Jun 2008 - 10:05am
bminihan
2007

Funny enough, I draw faster on paper than I do online, and I feel that
paper really stretches tremendously more than the screen does. Maybe
my monitor is too small (22" doesn't even begin to give me the room to
expand), but I have a 24x18" sketch pad on which I draw most of my
first inklings of a design. I can fill an entire page with variations
on a theme, or use several sheets to draw (quickly) one page design
after another.

One of my biggest problems with drafting CONCEPTS on the computer is
my own tendency to need to make it look perfect. I tend to lock into
one design faster on the computer than on paper, which isn't the goal
of ideation. The reason is because although I know how to use Visio
and Fireworks pretty well, they both excel at representing one solid
idea in a file - go much further beyond that and you encounter
performance problems. For instance, I've created several "concept
slide" files in Fireworks over the years, and they quickly get into
the 30-40 page realm. You can't view them side by side (easily) or
work on them simultaneously, and the CTRL-C/CTRL-V/adjust-position-
with-mouse thing is just much more slow than re-drawing an element on
diagram 3 that you liked on diagram 5.

As others have mentioned, once I've narrowed concepts down to 1-3,
it's off to the computer to see how it really works. Even then, I
pretty much get the graphics down then move straight into DHTML
prototypes as soon as I have what I need.

Regarding the environmental front...I'm a recovering pack rat, so one
of my few remaining pack-vices is that I have never thrown out a
single wireframe or sketch. I have piles of sketch pads at home going
back 15-20 years or so. I don't do everything on paper, so it takes
me about a year to go through a 150pg pad. I tend to use both sides
of each sheet when I can.

By the way, if you have tried sketching before and didn't like it or
didn't feel it was creative enough - bigger paper is one of the best
ways to open up your creative side and really get moving. There's a
tremendous difference between sketches done using your whole arm, as
opposed to sketching with just your wrist or fingertips.

Bryan Minihan
bjminihan at nc.rr.com

On Jun 20, 2008, at 6:28 AM, Bryan J Busch wrote:

> Paper refuses to stretch for me, either horizontally or vertically, in
> the way that Web browsers do. I suppose if there's a particular piece
> of an interface that you're imagining, and want to show someone,
> paper is okay. But not an entire page.
>
> My practical answer is that I am much faster using a computerized
> tool to mock something up. And if I'm mocking something up with
> HTML, then I end up with something that can be used in future phases.
>
>
> Also, pencils have an unfortunate smell about them. But that might
> just be me.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30390
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

20 Jun 2008 - 10:22am
Mark Schraad
2006

hmmm seriously, your computer is negatively contributing to the
environment at a rate far exceeding any design team's use of paper.

paper and pen (or white boarding) are essential tools in design.
omitting them has serious consequences. if you understand design
process, there are divergent stages that MUST remain loose and open to
iteration and open to derivation. if time is your primary concern or
if you really want to close down the innovation and iteration early in
the process, then by all means step immediately to the computer and
make boxes.

Mark

On Fri, Jun 20, 2008 at 9:32 AM, Bryan J Busch <bryanjbusch at gmail.com> wrote:
> Also, if you have the option of avoiding paper, I think it's the
> environmentally responsible thing to do.
>
> And if you're showing your sketch to someone who isn't in the
> office with you, you'll probably use a scanner or fax machine, which
> is more energy and paper wasted.
>
> Bah. Paper.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30390
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

20 Jun 2008 - 10:37am
Bryan J Busch
2006

I admit I hadn't considered using paper quite so big. I also should
say that I really don't like arguing, but I feel I should clarify
some things:

Some people feel like prototyping with a computer discourages
changing your mind about a particular layout or interaction.

I don't feel that way. It's a lot easier for me to click on
something and press "Delete" than erase with a pencil, or worse,
start the whole page over on a new piece of paper. Boy, do I hate
duplicating effort.

All that being said, I do enjoy using a whiteboard when I'm _just
starting to generate ideas_ as a part of a group who is in the room
with me. Overall, I think HTML prototypes are a better use of my
time, and I feel like I'm still able to remain loose and open.

Regarding the admittedly less important argument over wasting
electricity: it's likely that your computer is going to be running
whether you're paying attention to it or not, so I figure I might as
well be paying attention to it. If you have the discipline to turn off
the electronics when focusing on paper, then that's awesome.

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20 Jun 2008 - 10:47am
Dave Malouf
2005

Martin, in practice it definitely does. But not necessarily b/c of
complexity, but b/c of where my confidence (or the groups confidence
is in regards to the element). So sometimes I do more sketches for
the smaller objects.

Ideally though I would to be as prolific in my sketching variety as
possible.

-- dave

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20 Jun 2008 - 11:29am
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> I'm wondering how many, if any of you use pencil/pen and paper to work out
> wireframes?

I use my wall-sized whiteboard when in my home office, and a Moleskine when
out and about. Sketching is fast and very effective for brainstorming.

I also take pictures of the whiteboard sketches using my iPhone and then
email or sync so I have a record.

-r-

20 Jun 2008 - 2:05pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> I find sketching out interactions on a big pad of paper to be far superior
> to working from a whiteboard

The simple act of standing up to use a giant whiteboard is
perspective-altering. Great for getting out of the usual desk-chair slump
and getting those synapses firing. It turns design into a physical
experience rather than a purely cerebral one. (My whiteboard is 7 feet tall,
and I like to use the whole dern thing.)

-r-

20 Jun 2008 - 4:14pm
j.scot
2008

I second that emotion.

On Jun 20, 2008, at 12:05 PM, Robert Hoekman Jr wrote:

>
> I find sketching out interactions on a big pad of paper to be far
> superior
> to working from a whiteboard

The simple act of standing up to use a giant whiteboard is
perspective-altering. Great for getting out of the usual desk-chair
slump
and getting those synapses firing. It turns design into a physical
experience rather than a purely cerebral one. (My whiteboard is 7
feet tall,
and I like to use the whole dern thing.)

-r-
________________________________________________________________
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20 Jun 2008 - 8:37am
Glenn Walker
2008

Pencil/pen and paper or whiteboard, then onto tool of choice
(Fireworks/Smartdraw/Visio, plus SnagIt) for more "formal"
wireframes.

I'm still trying to determine which of the 3 I like best for
wireframing. Just started trying out Fireworks CS3 but have used
Smartdraw forever and it seems to be my go to app because of
familiarity. I would love to try Axure, but the license is a little
steep.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 Jun 2008 - 1:31pm
Matthew Anderson
2008

> I'm wondering how many, if any of you use pencil/pen and paper to work out
> wireframes?

I find sketching out interactions on a big pad of paper to be far superior
to working from a whiteboard or a piece of software. It's quick, portable,
and stores the work progression -- and it helps foster stakeholder
participation doing sketches together in meetings.

Cheers,
Matt

I use my wall-sized whiteboard when in my home office, and a Moleskine when
out and about. Sketching is fast and very effective for brainstorming.

I also take pictures of the whiteboard sketches using my iPhone and then
email or sync so I have a record.

On 6/20/08 9:29 AM, "Robert Hoekman Jr" <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:

>>
>> I'm wondering how many, if any of you use pencil/pen and paper to work out
>> wireframes?
>
>
> I use my wall-sized whiteboard when in my home office, and a Moleskine when
> out and about. Sketching is fast and very effective for brainstorming.
>
> I also take pictures of the whiteboard sketches using my iPhone and then
> email or sync so I have a record.

22 Jun 2008 - 8:55am
Greg Newman
2008

I got out of practice from sketching years ago Mike. I created a bad
habit of doing quick mockups in photoshop, illustrator or
omnigraffle. I went back to doing wireframes in a moleskine about
six months ago and just switch to the behance dot-grids about a month
ago.

Now that I'm back to pencil/pen wireframes, I find I can get many
ideas down quicker. I wish I had never strayed from pencil/pen
wireframing.

BTW... y

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21 Jun 2008 - 9:00am
mark ahlenius
2008

Hi -

I'm new to this group, so pardon my intrusion. I hope this is the right
place to ask - I have a comment to toss in and and question;

Interesting thread on sketching. A book I really like about sketching UE
stuff which applies to some interaction design issues is a book by Bill
Buxton called "Sketching User Experiences" (Morgan Kaufmann). In the
book he discussed different ways of doing this, even sometimes on planes
of glass viewable from two sides then. The book got me so interested in
sketching, that I've thought about taking a sketching class at a local
community college. My old engineering drafting methods are just too
perfectionistic and slow. There are also a lot of great ideas in the
books by Edward Tufte.

My question is for a recommendation on a good book on interaction
design. I already have The Essentials of Interaction Design by
Cooper/Reimann, was looking for other recommendations. Web design
types are plentiful, but also interested in other modalities.

thanks much,

'mark

Glenn Walker wrote:
> Pencil/pen and paper or whiteboard, then onto tool of choice
> (Fireworks/Smartdraw/Visio, plus SnagIt) for more "formal"
> wireframes.
>
> I'm still trying to determine which of the 3 I like best for
> wireframing. Just started trying out Fireworks CS3 but have used
> Smartdraw forever and it seems to be my go to app because of
> familiarity. I would love to try Axure, but the license is a little
> steep.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30390
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>

22 Jun 2008 - 11:12am
Mark Schraad
2006

Hi Mark,

I think the Buxton book, even on its third reading, is probably more
important than any other design book I have read in the two years
since grad school.

Mark

On Jun 21, 2008, at 10:00 AM, Mark Ahlenius wrote:

> Hi -
>
> I'm new to this group, so pardon my intrusion. I hope this is the
> right place to ask - I have a comment to toss in and and question;
>
> Interesting thread on sketching. A book I really like about
> sketching UE stuff which applies to some interaction design issues
> is a book by Bill Buxton called "Sketching User
> Experiences" (Morgan Kaufmann). In the book he discussed
> different ways of doing this, even sometimes on planes of glass
> viewable from two sides then. The book got me so interested in
> sketching, that I've thought about taking a sketching class at a
> local community college. My old engineering drafting methods are
> just too perfectionistic and slow. There are also a lot of great
> ideas in the books by Edward Tufte.
>
> My question is for a recommendation on a good book on interaction
> design. I already have The Essentials of Interaction Design by
> Cooper/Reimann, was looking for other recommendations. Web
> design types are plentiful, but also interested in other modalities.
>
> thanks much,
>
> 'mark
>
> Glenn Walker wrote:
>> Pencil/pen and paper or whiteboard, then onto tool of choice
>> (Fireworks/Smartdraw/Visio, plus SnagIt) for more "formal"
>> wireframes.
>>
>> I'm still trying to determine which of the 3 I like best for
>> wireframing. Just started trying out Fireworks CS3 but have used
>> Smartdraw forever and it seems to be my go to app because of
>> familiarity. I would love to try Axure, but the license is a little
>> steep.
>>
>>
>> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>> Posted from the new ixda.org
>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=30390
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

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