Layered/Faceted Navigation Techniques

29 Apr 2008 - 3:01pm
6 years ago
6 replies
2544 reads
Thomas Marks
2008

I am looking for information on Layered (Faceted) Navigation
techniques, especially in regards to e-commerce.

I see this similar type of navigation working very differently between
most sites out there.

I was wondering if there were any favorites out there, or any research/
user studies that might assist in developing a best practice for this.

Thanks!

Thomas Marks

Comments

30 Apr 2008 - 7:09am
Anonymous

I asked about this a while ago:
<http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=23190&search=facet>

Best
Johan

Apr 29, 2008 kl. 10:01 PM skrev Thomas Marks:

> I am looking for information on Layered (Faceted) Navigation
> techniques, especially in regards to e-commerce.
>
> I see this similar type of navigation working very differently between
> most sites out there.
>
> I was wondering if there were any favorites out there, or any
> research/
> user studies that might assist in developing a best practice for this.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Thomas Marks
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

30 Apr 2008 - 7:48am
Daniel Williams
2005

This is a great article about faceted navigation and may help....

http://www.digital-web.com/articles/user_interface_implementations_of_faceted_browsing/

On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 1:09 PM, Johan Sjöstrand <
johan.sjostrand at hyperisland.se> wrote:

> I asked about this a while ago:
> <http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=23190&search=facet>
>
> Best
> Johan
>
>
>
>
> Apr 29, 2008 kl. 10:01 PM skrev Thomas Marks:
>
> > I am looking for information on Layered (Faceted) Navigation
> > techniques, especially in regards to e-commerce.
> >
> > I see this similar type of navigation working very differently between
> > most sites out there.
> >
> > I was wondering if there were any favorites out there, or any
> > research/
> > user studies that might assist in developing a best practice for this.
> >
> > Thanks!
> >
> > Thomas Marks
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

30 Apr 2008 - 8:08am
SemanticWill
2007

Thomas – first, faceted search/navigation is one possible techinique to use
– but it is not a panacea. There are many types of techniques available
(federated, for instance), which is why you must really start from the
problem space definition (area of concern), and do the user research to find
out the predominate information seeking behavior your users are going to be
employing to achieve their goals. That said – I'll start by giving you some
research papers you really should read, proceed to some ideas about why
facets can work, what you should thing about, and follow by some examples.

Some research:

Semantic Search

*http://tinyurl.com/5ovz4u*

Dynamic Taxonomies and guided navigation

*http://tinyurl.com/6ah9kz*

The Design of Browsing and berrypicking techiques for the online search
interface.

*http://tinyurl.com/2lyafa*

------

Why do facets work?

Increased findability leads to increased business results

• More people find what they're looking for – faster –
thus improving conversion rate

• Increased customer satisfaction and loyalty

• Decreased customer service cost

Opportunities for targeted merchandising

• Up-selling based on selected facets (similar atributes might mean
affinities in the customers mind)

• Cross-selling based on selected facets

• Each facet selected is valuable customer data (these are
attributes customers are saying they are interested in!)

The faceted interface is only as good as what lies behind it – this means
implemenation of a faceted navigation for e-commerce or anything else WILL
FAIL unless the IA work is done up front – this can be daunting….

• Good metadata

• Useful

• Accurate

• Clear

• User-centered taxonomy and labeling (test, test, test!)

• Good search

• Relevancy

• Thesaurus (synonyms, acronyms, abbreviations, stemming, spelling
variants, stop words)

Your goal should be: Ensure users will notice the facets in the first place

• Placement

• Prominence

• Connection to results

Some Examples:

PCs: PCConnection

Books: Barnes and Noble

Music: Tower Records

Jobs: CareerBuilder

Resaurants: Citysearch

Recipes: Epicurious

Tools: HomeDepot

Travel: Kayak.com

Things things to think about:

• What facets should appear?

• What order should the facets appear in?

• Make sure there is normalization across categories for attributes
– this can be time consuming

• Looking at your logs (past user behavior can tell a lot about
user information seeking behavior)

• Click paths and feature usage

• Search terms

• Talk with your users, then talk to them again – and try to get
some that can come back and review prototypes

• Interviews

• Survey

• Minimize information overload

• Never allow

----------

This is just a start to some things to consider and review. Go to Peter
Morville's site on Search Design Patters to review alternatives, as well as
examples of faceted search/navaition:

http://www.findability.org/archives/000194.php

Hope this helps,
--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

30 Apr 2008 - 8:13am
SemanticWill
2007

More resources:

*Information scent as a driver of Web behavior graphs. *
*Proceedings of the Conference on Human factors in computing systems CHI '01
Association for Computing **Machinery. *
By Card, Stuart K., Peter Pirolli

*Sorting out searching: a user-interface framework for text searches*
*Communications of the ACM *
Ben Shneiderman, Donald Byrd, W. Bruce Croft

*A User-interface framework for text searches *
*http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january97/retrieval/01shneiderman.html *
*D-Lib Magazine *
Ben Shneiderman, Donald Byrd, W. Bruce Croft

On Wed, Apr 30, 2008 at 9:08 AM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>
wrote:

> Thomas – first, faceted search/navigation is one possible techinique to
> use – but it is not a panacea. There are many types of techniques available
> (federated, for instance), which is why you must really start from the
> problem space definition (area of concern), and do the user research to find
> out the predominate information seeking behavior your users are going to be
> employing to achieve their goals. That said – I'll start by giving you some
> research papers you really should read, proceed to some ideas about why
> facets can work, what you should thing about, and follow by some examples.
>
>
> Some research:
>
> Semantic Search
>
> *http://tinyurl.com/5ovz4u*
>
> Dynamic Taxonomies and guided navigation
>
> *http://tinyurl.com/6ah9kz*
>
> The Design of Browsing and berrypicking techiques for the online search
> interface.
>
> *http://tinyurl.com/2lyafa*
>
> ------
>
> Why do facets work?
>
> Increased findability leads to increased business results
>
> • More people find what they're looking for – faster –
> thus improving conversion rate
>
> • Increased customer satisfaction and loyalty
>
> • Decreased customer service cost
>
>
> Opportunities for targeted merchandising
>
> • Up-selling based on selected facets (similar atributes might
> mean affinities in the customers mind)
>
> • Cross-selling based on selected facets
>
> • Each facet selected is valuable customer data (these are
> attributes customers are saying they are interested in!)
>
>
> The faceted interface is only as good as what lies behind it – this means
> implemenation of a faceted navigation for e-commerce or anything else WILL
> FAIL unless the IA work is done up front – this can be daunting….
>
> • Good metadata
>
> • Useful
>
> • Accurate
>
> • Clear
>
> • User-centered taxonomy and labeling (test, test, test!)
>
> • Good search
>
> • Relevancy
>
> • Thesaurus (synonyms, acronyms, abbreviations, stemming,
> spelling variants, stop words)
>
>
>
> Your goal should be: Ensure users will notice the facets in the first
> place
>
> • Placement
>
> • Prominence
>
> • Connection to results
>
>
>
> Some Examples:
>
> PCs: PCConnection
>
> Books: Barnes and Noble
>
> Music: Tower Records
>
> Jobs: CareerBuilder
>
> Resaurants: Citysearch
>
> Recipes: Epicurious
>
> Tools: HomeDepot
>
> Travel: Kayak.com
>
>
> Things things to think about:
>
> • What facets should appear?
>
> • What order should the facets appear in?
>
> • Make sure there is normalization across categories for
> attributes – this can be time consuming
>
> • Looking at your logs (past user behavior can tell a lot about
> user information seeking behavior)
>
> • Click paths and feature usage
>
> • Search terms
>
> • Talk with your users, then talk to them again – and try to get
> some that can come back and review prototypes
>
> • Interviews
>
> • Survey
>
> • Minimize information overload
>
> • Never allow
>
> ----------
>
> This is just a start to some things to consider and review. Go to Peter
> Morville's site on Search Design Patters to review alternatives, as well as
> examples of faceted search/navaition:
>
> http://www.findability.org/archives/000194.php
>
>
> Hope this helps,
> --
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
> tel +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

30 Apr 2008 - 10:26am
SemanticWill
2007

Thomas – first,

faceted search/navigation is one possible technique to use – but it is not a
panacea. There are many types of techniques available (federated, for
instance), which is why you must really start from the problem space
definition (area of concern), and do the user research to find out the
predominate information seeking behavior your users are going to be
employing to achieve their goals. That said – I'll start by giving you some
research papers you really should read, proceed to some ideas about why
facets can work, what you should thing about, and follow by some examples.

*Some research:*

Semantic Search
*http://tinyurl.com/5ovz4u*

Dynamic Taxonomies and guided navigation
*http://tinyurl.com/6ah9kz*

The Design of Browsing and berrypicking techiques for the online search
interface.
*http://tinyurl.com/2lyafa*

*More:*

Information scent as a driver of Web behavior graphs.

Proceedings of the Conference on Human factors in computing systems CHI '01
Association for Computing Machinery.
By Card, Stuart K., Peter Pirolli

Sorting out searching: a user-interface framework for text searches
Communications of the ACM
Ben Shneiderman, Donald Byrd, W. Bruce Croft

A User-interface framework for text searches
http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january97/retrieval/01shneiderman.html
D-Lib Magazine
Ben Shneiderman, Donald Byrd, W. Bruce Croft

------

Why do facets work for e-commerce:

- Increased findability leads to increased business results
- More people find what they're looking for – faster – thus improving
conversion rates
- Increased customer satisfaction and loyalty
- Decreased customer service costs
- Opportunities for targeted merchandising
- Up-selling based on selected facets (similar attributes might mean
affinities in the customer's minds)
- Cross Selling based on selected facets

The faceted interface is only as good as what lies behind it – this means
implementation of a faceted navigation for e-commerce or anything else WILL
FAIL unless the IA work is done up front – this can be daunting…you need:

· Good metadata

· Useful

· Accurate

· Clear

· User-centered taxonomy and labeling (test, test, test!)

· Good search engine

· Relevancy

· Recency

· Thesaurus (synonyms, acronyms, abbreviations, stemming, multiple
spellings variants, stop words)

And this will do you no good if your facets aren't even noticed – so from a
UI perspective you need to think about:

· Placement

· Prominence

· Connection to results

· Typography

· Use of whitespace

*Some Examples:
*
PCs: PCConnection
Books: Barnes and Noble
Music: Tower Records
Jobs: CareerBuilder
Resaurants: Citysearch
Recipes: Epicurious
Tools: HomeDepot
Travel: Kayak.com**

Things to think about:

· What facets should you surface to the UI?

· What order should the facets appear in

· Make sure there is normalization across categories and facets –
this can be time consuming

· Look at your log files (past user behavior can tell a lot about
user information seeking behavior

· Click-path and feature usage

· Search Terms

· Talk with your users, then talk with them again – and try to get
some that can come back and review prototypes

· Use Interviews

· User Surveys

· Use contextual observation

This is just a start to some things to consider and review. Go to Peter
Morville's site on Search Design Patters to review alternatives, as well as
examples of faceted search/navigation:

http://www.findability.org/archives/000194.php

Hope this helps,

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

>
> >
> >
> > Apr 29, 2008 kl. 10:01 PM skrev Thomas Marks:
> >
> > > I am looking for information on Layered (Faceted) Navigation
> > > techniques, especially in regards to e-commerce.
> > >
> > > I see this similar type of navigation working very differently between
> > > most sites out there.
> > >
> > > I was wondering if there were any favorites out there, or any
> > > research/
> > > user studies that might assist in developing a best practice for this.
> > >
> > > Thanks!
> > >
> > > Thomas Marks
>
>

8 May 2008 - 10:06am
Andrea Richeson
2008

For a start, take a look at:
http://www.boxesandarrows.com/person/51-mikesteckel

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28562

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