Best practices to evangelize UX design?

17 Apr 2008 - 10:28pm
6 years ago
5 replies
999 reads
Suba Periyasami
2008

What are some of the strategies that you have used to evangelize UX and
usability practices in your company?

The following are some tips that I think works

Showing videos of users frustrating experience with the product

Measuring user experience of the new design and publicizing (using wall
posters or by blogging on the web site) how improved the product is for the
user.
Anything you can add ?

-Suba Periyasami

Comments

18 Apr 2008 - 2:57pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> What are some of the strategies that you have used to evangelize UX and
> usability practices in your company?
>

1. Start by going for the quick wins in every product you can touch. Results
will be noticed, and word will get out. Soon enough, you'll start seeing
people come to you because they heard you were the expert and had success on
other projects. In other words, focus on getting results instead of
evangelizing theories.

2. Every time you make a design recommendation, explain it. People will
learn from you and start making better decisions on their own.

Showing videos of users frustrating experience with the product

This can be a great way to make people hate you. You don't want to be the
person who tells a bunch of developers that their product—the one they spend
all their time and energy on—is bad. They'll resent you just for being the
person to point it out.

-r-

18 Apr 2008 - 7:14pm
dszuc
2005

Hi Suba:

Suggest the "message" will change depending on who you are are pitching to in an
organisation.

We use product examples that people understand e.g. Google, talk about why they
delight, talk about products they use that delight them, tell stories about
where we have applied UX/Usability/UCD on projects, touch on process and then
move quickly into understanding their busines.

We try and avoid jargon (where possible) and determine if the people we are
speaking to are receptive to the UX message in the first place and the ways
they are already practicing UX (without even knowing it;)

Also see:
https://www.usabilityprofessionals.org/upa_conference/program/2008/activity.php?id=9241

rgds,
--
Daniel Szuc
Principal Usability Consultant
www.apogeehk.com
T: +852 2581 2166
F: +852 2833 2961
"Usability in Asia"

Quoting Suba Periyasami <speriyas at gmail.com>:

> What are some of the strategies that you have used to evangelize UX and
> usability practices in your company?
>
> The following are some tips that I think works
>
> Showing videos of users frustrating experience with the product
>
> Measuring user experience of the new design and publicizing (using wall
> posters or by blogging on the web site) how improved the product is for the
> user.
> Anything you can add ?
>
> -Suba Periyasami
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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>

19 Apr 2008 - 9:06am
Bruno Figueiredo
2007

I would go primarily with Robert's advice. If you have the time, I
would suggest you to put up a presentation about similar companies
that improved their products with good UX design and what they gained
with it. Hard numbers usually open up the eyes of management people
and these are the ones you'll want to hit first as they're the ones
with the money and power to do something about it.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28229

19 Apr 2008 - 4:32pm
Chauncey Wilson
2007

This is a good discussion. A few additional thoughts:

1. The term "evangelist" can be a bit intimidating. It often implies
that what we do is more important than what others (developers,
product managers, writers) do. My strong belief is that we should aim
to be at the same level other important aspects of a product
(reliability, features, maintainability, etc.).
2. Provide a rationale when you work (mentioned earlier and I would
like to second that). Some evangelists make proclamations, while
others provide explanations and rationale for their requests.
3. Keep your work in the minds of those you don't work with every day
(Vice Presidents, directors, etc).
4. Point out good things about a product.
5. Develop a library and share it with others. There are now
hundreds of books on UI design, usability, visual design, etc.
6. Have brownbags that mix fun with useful stuff and make sure your
first speaker is both knowledgable AND entertaining.
7. Post examples of your work in the hallway. Use things that show
contrast like before and after pictures. For example, let's say you
simplified an interaction that took 12 steps in the last version, but
now takes 6 -- that would be an impressive display that would catch
the eye of almost anyone.
8. Raffle off a good book at a brownbag sometime (say Buxton's latest
book on Sketching).
9. Have a monthly video show where you show good videos like the one
that Jensen Harris did on the development of the Microsoft Ribbon for
Office 2007. There are many videos around.
10. Publish highlights of any studies that you do.
11. Create a idea board where you post ideas or sketches.
12. Have a "method of the month" poster where you highlight a method
that others might find useful (say a q-sort).
13. Develop a "connections" diagram that shows who you have positive
and negative connections with. Use circles of different sixes to
indicate importance. Work to establish more links with influential
people.
14. Hlightlight instances where you speak at professional societies
(IxDA, HFES, UPA, SIGCHI).
15. Conduct a metaphor brainstorming session where you brainstorm
metaphors related to selling what you do (evangelizing). You might
come up with ideas that stimulate some ideas about evangelism like:
rebates, coupons, test drives, billboards, feature lists (list all the
things that you do and post that somewhere), associate with movie
stars.
16. Develop a reading list that you can share.
17. Develop things that are tangible (for example, if you are
designing a new UI, got some of the magent paper that you can print
components on and let your colleagues do some design -- you can buy
100 credit card sized magnets at Staples for 22 USD that you could
draw menus on and stick on a whiteboard like those magnetic poetry
kits.

Chauncey

On Sat, Apr 19, 2008 at 10:06 AM, Bruno Figueiredo
<bruno.figueiredo at gmail.com> wrote:
> I would go primarily with Robert's advice. If you have the time, I
> would suggest you to put up a presentation about similar companies
> that improved their products with good UX design and what they gained
> with it. Hard numbers usually open up the eyes of management people
> and these are the ones you'll want to hit first as they're the ones
> with the money and power to do something about it.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=28229
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

27 Apr 2008 - 12:57pm
Uday Gajendar
2007

On Apr 17, 2008, at 8:28 PM, Suba Periyasami wrote:
> What are some of the strategies that you have used to evangelize UX
> and
> usability practices in your company?

FYI, I just saw this interview by Adaptive Path of our User Experience
boss at Cisco, Cordell Ratzlaff:

http://www.adaptivepath.com/ideas/essays/archives/000926.php

Relevant points for this thread is the section about "successful
tactics for cultural change", quoted below:

<snip>

CR: Ninety percent of the effort is about affecting culture change.
The design work is actually the easy part. Transformation tactics that
have worked well include:

• Inspiring people with a clear vision. A shared vision that people
are excited about will take on its own momentum

• Setting high standards and sticking to them. We’ve sought out
opportunities to point out that the old way of doing things is not
acceptable

• Persistence. Change is hard and corporate inertia can be difficult
to overcome. It’s much easier to manage the status quo than to enforce
change. Senior leadership communicates and reinforces the benefits of
making this transformation every chance we get
Delivering and celebrating successes along the way has helped everyone
see that all the hard work associated with the change is worth it.

</snip>

Hope it helps,

Uday Gajendar
Sr. Interaction Designer
Voice Technology Group
Cisco | San Jose
------------------------------
ugajenda at cisco.com
+1 408 902 2137

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