what helped most in your career?

16 Mar 2008 - 2:21pm
6 years ago
23 replies
1853 reads
stauciuc
2006

Hi all,

If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly improved
your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set of
values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
So.. what is it?

Sebi

--
Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/

Comments

16 Mar 2008 - 2:44pm
Mark Schraad
2006

failure

On Mar 16, 2008, at 4:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly
> improved
> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
> Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set of
> values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
> So.. what is it?
>
> Sebi
>
> --
> Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
> http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

16 Mar 2008 - 2:59pm
SemanticWill
2007

Harsh criticism. Failure. Rejection. Unemployment really forces you to
be a better designer.

will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
617.281.1281

On Mar 16, 2008, at 4:44 PM, mark schraad <mschraad at gmail.com> wrote:

> failure
>
>
> On Mar 16, 2008, at 4:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to
>> your
>> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly
>> improved
>> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
>> Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set
>> of
>> values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
>> So.. what is it?
>>
>> Sebi
>>
>> --
>> Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
>> http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

16 Mar 2008 - 3:07pm
Mark Schraad
2006

ok - besides a failure... a first rate mentor

On Mar 16, 2008, at 4:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly
> improved
> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
> Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set of
> values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
> So.. what is it?
>
> Sebi
>
> --
> Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
> http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

16 Mar 2008 - 3:30pm
Nancy Broden
2005

Besides failure and unemployment (which really forces you to decide
whether this is something you *really* want to pursue):

Experience: design becomes more intuitive the more you mileage you
have on you. Go figure.

Belief in oneself: coming from Canada to the US in 2000, I was under
the impression that everyone here knew something I didn't and were
better than I was. I was wrong. Finally realizing that a few years
later helped me turn the corner.

I would have loved a mentor, but there was no one there for me.

Nancy
--------------------------------
Nancy Broden
nancy.broden at gmail.com

16 Mar 2008 - 3:59pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Unbounded curiosity.

// jeff

Sebi wrote:
> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed
> most to your success, that brought a lot of value to
> your work, that greatly improved your design skills
> (you get the idea), what would it be?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160

16 Mar 2008 - 4:00pm
Dave Malouf
2005

my career has skyrocketted in the last 5 years (out of 15). I
attribute that to these things:

IxDA - being active here has put me in close contact with
"experience". You can't accelerate experience, but you can give
yourself more access to it, and try to be open to other people's
experience.

Mentors - lots of them and really good ones. Of course, IxDA has been
the main way that I got in touch with mentors. There are also
different types. There are the mentors at yoru day-to-day job and the
mentors away from your job. Both types are invaluable.

Failure -- it speaks for itself.

Confidence -- Being wrong confidently is a powerful tool. It really
is. Take Stevie J. and Apple Tv. ;)

Passion -- Ya gotta love it.

Argue -- Don't be afraid to argue with your superiors (well out f
the work place). I've learned more from arguing with Jared, Andrei,
and Robert R. than any course I could imagine. :) Maybe it is a style
thing, but it works for me anyway.

OH! Explore w/o boundaries ...
Travel ... Learn another language besides your native language, and
read/watch lots of Sci-Fi. (I'm not kidding).

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160

16 Mar 2008 - 4:09pm
aschechterman
2004

Like Mark, two first rate mentors for very brief periods of time, one
"within" the field (Herb Simon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Simon) and
one "outside" of the field (Milton Erickson:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_H._Erickson). Both helped me understand
and deeply respect the "user experience." - Andrew Schechterman
On Sun, Mar 16, 2008 at 3:07 PM, mark schraad <mschraad at gmail.com> wrote:

> ok - besides a failure... a first rate mentor
>
>
> On Mar 16, 2008, at 4:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc wrote:
>
> > Hi all,
> >
> > If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> > success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly
> > improved
> > your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
> > Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set of
> > values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
> > So.. what is it?
> >
> > Sebi
> >
> > --
> > Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
> > http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/
>

16 Mar 2008 - 4:47pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly improved
> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?

Extreme passion and curiosity, and ... something that hasn't been mentioned
yet ... teaching it to others.

One of the best ways to learn something is to teach it to others. It forces
you to articulate ideas and concepts you may not have articulated before,
and it really helps you focus your opinions and perspective, unify your
message (if you have one), figure out how to argue your points when you need
to, and much more.

Blogs, presentations, articles, conversations with friends ... you name it.
It can all help you glue things together.

-r-

16 Mar 2008 - 7:12pm
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

Trying to do a PhD, at two different universities. It made me known as
something of an expert (I'd managed to impress sveral faculty members)
in user interface issues even after I had to leave the program at the
first university (for lack of money) and got kicked out of the program
at the second. Also, both in preparing the PhD application (it took
nearly two years of work) and in the readings I did during the program,
I learnt a lot.

--- Sebi Tauciuc <stauciuc at gmail.com> a écrit :

> Hi all,
>
> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to
> your
> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly
> improved
> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
> Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set
> of
> values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
> So.. what is it?
>
> Sebi
>
> --
> Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
> http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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http://www.flickr.com/gift/

17 Mar 2008 - 9:14am
Michael Micheletti
2006

On Sun, Mar 16, 2008 at 1:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc <stauciuc at gmail.com> wrote:

> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly improved
> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
>

I'd say that practice, practice, practice has made the most difference to
me. In design and music both. A steady stream of design projects of all
stripes over years, with some succeeding, some flopping. Some as solo
efforts, some as a tiny cog in a great machine.

Education, professional associations, reading, and many kind helpful people
have all been valuable, irreplaceable even, but nothing can supplant
practice. From practice grows competence, confidence, and what I hope may be
the early beginnings of wisdom.

Michael Micheletti

17 Mar 2008 - 10:46am
Chauncey Wilson
2007

Things that have helped me along the way are:

1. Good mentors early in my career who pushed some of the boundaries
(specifically, John Whiteside and my team at DEC in the sixties.

2. Self-reflection (objective self-awareness)

3. Attribution theory (critical for relationships) and it's various
principles like the actor-observer difference and the fundamental
attribution error (FAE --- REALLY IMPORTANT FOR COLLABORATION!)

4. Reading in depth and keeping up with research. Blogs are nice,
but actually diigging into the research and serious books and articles
refreshes one's perspective.

5. A solid grounding in statistics, research methods, and
experimental design (to help understand the role of randomness, the
importance of outliers, and the many biases that can creep into our
analysis and interpretation.

6. Testing assumptions of generally accepted design and evaluation
methods and processes. For example, there is a widescale belief that
contextual inquiry leads to better designs, but the only study that
actually tested that assumption was a weak study reported at CHI with
relatively weak positive results.

Chauncey

On Mon, Mar 17, 2008 at 11:14 AM, Michael Micheletti
<michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sun, Mar 16, 2008 at 1:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc <stauciuc at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> > success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly improved
> > your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
> >
>
> I'd say that practice, practice, practice has made the most difference to
> me. In design and music both. A steady stream of design projects of all
> stripes over years, with some succeeding, some flopping. Some as solo
> efforts, some as a tiny cog in a great machine.
>
> Education, professional associations, reading, and many kind helpful people
> have all been valuable, irreplaceable even, but nothing can supplant
> practice. From practice grows competence, confidence, and what I hope may be
> the early beginnings of wisdom.
>
> Michael Micheletti
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

17 Mar 2008 - 2:19pm
Benjamin Ho
2007

In no particular order:

1. Not caring in what others think of me.
2. Not caring in the outcome of projects.
3. Being comfortable with uncertainty.
4. Having a personal code of honor to abide by.
5. Learning about Servant Leadership and other professional
development topics to apply to everyday life.
6. Staying current with everything related to IxD and Usability,
from blogs, articles, videos, courses, meetings.
7. HFI Certification.
8. Letting the evidence speak for itself.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160

17 Mar 2008 - 3:30pm
Roeland
2008

Experience. My first boss 25 years ago said that he was leery about
hiring a guy with 20 years in one job. He did not see that as 20
years experience, but rather 2 years experience and 18 years
repetition. I've taken this, perhaps too much to heart, by
frequently changing not only jobs, but careers and countries.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160

17 Mar 2008 - 4:39pm
Ari
2006

two things:

1) finally getting a job opportunity that matched my interests and unlocked
my potential
2) getting thrown into the fire (napalm) and having no choice but to do what
i needed to know

On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 14:59:53, Jeff Howard <id at howardesign.com> wrote:
>
> Unbounded curiosity.
>
> // jeff
>
> Sebi wrote:
> > If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed
> > most to your success, that brought a lot of value to
> > your work, that greatly improved your design skills
> > (you get the idea), what would it be?
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

17 Mar 2008 - 4:44pm
Johansen, Kristen
2006

I've always tried to make sure that whatever job I've
had, there should be something challenging enough about
it that I'm a little scared to do it.

If that feeling isn't there about some aspect of my job,
it means I'm not learning or growing anymore and it's
time to find something else to do!

k

17 Mar 2008 - 4:48pm
SemanticWill
2007

Higher and listen to people that are darn good at something -
for instance - a long time ago, I hired a friend with a degree in graphic
design. We were doing Shockwave for CD interact(ive) work for Toyota.

He taught me more about typography than any book ever could - and I listened
everytime he spoke about Why he choose to use What he choose. I have learned
an amazing amount from people who worked for me.

On Mon, Mar 17, 2008 at 6:39 PM, Ari Feldman <ari1970 at gmail.com> wrote:

> two things:
>
> 1) finally getting a job opportunity that matched my interests and
> unlocked
> my potential
> 2) getting thrown into the fire (napalm) and having no choice but to do
> what
> i needed to know
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 14:59:53, Jeff Howard <id at howardesign.com> wrote:
> >
> > Unbounded curiosity.
> >
> > // jeff
> >
> > Sebi wrote:
> > > If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed
> > > most to your success, that brought a lot of value to
> > > your work, that greatly improved your design skills
> > > (you get the idea), what would it be?
> >
> >
> > . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> > Posted from the new ixda.org
> > http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160
> >
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
>
>
>
> --
> --------------------------------------------------
> www.flyingyogi.com
> --------------------------------------------------
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | CrowdSprout
tel +1.617.281.1281 | fax +1.617.507.6016 | will at crowdsprout.com

17 Mar 2008 - 4:49pm
SemanticWill
2007

Hire - that is - my spelling has gone to the birds this afternoon.

On Mon, Mar 17, 2008 at 6:48 PM, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:

> Higher and listen to people that are darn good at something -
> for instance - a long time ago, I hired a friend with a degree in graphic
> design. We were doing Shockwave for CD interact(ive) work for Toyota.
>
> He taught me more about typography than any book ever could - and I
> listened everytime he spoke about Why he choose to use What he choose. I
> have learned an amazing amount from people who worked for me.
>
>

17 Mar 2008 - 4:53pm
Ari
2006

self actualization with one's work is something not everyone can attain.

early in my career, i got pigeon-holed as being technical or there weren't
positions that met my interest or background.

later, i realized there were things i was good at and enjoyed doing and was
able to do it and make a living to.

i get bored often as well, which is why i've had more jobs in my career then
most people have socks.

On 3/17/08, Kristen Johansen <Kristen.Johansen at citrix.com> wrote:
>
>
> I've always tried to make sure that whatever job I've
> had, there should be something challenging enough about
> it that I'm a little scared to do it.
>
> If that feeling isn't there about some aspect of my job,
> it means I'm not learning or growing anymore and it's
> time to find something else to do!
>
>
> k
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

17 Mar 2008 - 5:03pm
Uday Gajendar
2007

Not much more to add than what's already been said but I would say:

1. Drive, ambition, passion: You've got to want to create the best.

2. The "social": the friends, mentors, conversations, conferences,
events, networking
(and yes, location has played a valuable role for me in this regard;
being in silicon valley has been just extraordinary with the rich
population (ha!) of designers, techies, biz folks...and all the
different places to "do design" in this area, and thus learn from the
diverse process/culture/strategy approaches)

3. I realize it's not popular to say this, but I'll just say it:
talent. (and intellect) I'm incredibly grateful for the talent I have
(and evolved over the years via all the projects and mentors) which
has helped me greatly in my career. I would not be honest if I didn't
acknowledge that.

And of course, my design career will evolve continuously...It's a
journey :-) Enjoy it!

Uday Gajendar
Sr. Interaction Designer
Voice Technology Group
Cisco | San Jose
------------------------------
ugajenda at cisco.com
+1 408 902 2137

On Mar 16, 2008, at 1:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly
> improved
> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
> Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set of
> values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
> So.. what is it?

18 Mar 2008 - 6:28am
Kevin Doyle
2007

What attributed to my success? Not being afraid to bite off more than
I could chew. You have to risk and accept the possibility of failure
in order to succeed.

What brought a lot of value to my work? Learning how to take
criticism gracefully.

What has greatly improved my design skills? Practice, accepting
criticism and experience.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160

18 Mar 2008 - 6:12am
David Talbot
2008

I would say curiosity and open mind.
It also helps me to have a strong technological background in order
to find solutions to design needs. This also help me to communicate
with developers : to understand their concerns. Even if I won't
agree to diminish usability level for ease of programming ; I think
it's good for teamwork to understand each other and take others
point in consideration.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=27160

18 Mar 2008 - 1:27pm
Michael Quibuyen
2003

Experiences + Curiosity: Having many of them. Giving each experience
context by exploring its gamut. Consciously experiencing things I
naturally wouldn't. Questioning everything. Challenging beliefs. Being
wary of product/service idolatry.

Risk: (What I might call) strategically-executed risk and deviance can
be fun and rewarding, and equally deflating. Very necessary in making
advances.

Alliances: Finding and creating strategic alliances--necessary to get
things done in certain climates. The process is fun--it's like social
treasure-hunting.

Self-reflection + feedback: Continually evaluating and improving
myself until I croak. Being open to feedback from quality sources.

and most importantly...

Quality of life: Focusing on my own and advocating it for my peers and
colleagues has been the most helpful, most rewarding attitude thus
far.

22 Mar 2008 - 2:15am
stauciuc
2006

Great answers, everyone, thanks for the inspiration!

Here is a short summary I put together (my apologies if I left something
out):

Things that helped in (design) people's career:

- *failure!*
- unemployment
- criticism; knowing how to take criticism
- *mentors!*
- faith, confidence
- *curiosity; exploration;* reading SF, learning another language
- *passion!*
- teaching to others
- volunteering
- education; formal certification; trying to do a PhD
- *practice, experience*
- self-reflection
- collaboration skills; attribution theory
- being up to date - books, articles, blogs, conversations
- challenging assumptions
- being comfortable with uncertainty
- getting the right job
- taking risks; big challenges
- talent
- technical background
- quality of life

I emphasized those that seemed to be mentioned repeatedly.

On Sun, Mar 16, 2008 at 10:21 PM, Sebi Tauciuc <stauciuc at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> If you were to name one thing (or a few) that contributed most to your
> success, that brought a lot of value to your work, that greatly improved
> your design skills (you get the idea), what would it be?
> Maybe it's a decision you made, maybe it's an attitude, maybe a set of
> values. Whatever it is, it helped you in a major way.
> So.. what is it?
>
> Sebi
>
> --
> Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
> http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/

--
Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/

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