Means to an IxDA message? WAS: Where are all the designers?

21 Feb 2008 - 7:15pm
6 years ago
4 replies
746 reads
Elizabeth Bacon
2003

There are simply more jobs than IxDs right now. We're all engaged in
solving interesting problems, and the world is exploding with yet
more possibilities.

The fear I share with others is that we all face a serious
professional issue if unqualified folks fill IxD shoes and cause
industry to sour on our discipline. I'm thinking that facing outward
and being more direct with industry is crucial for IxDA. Leaving
aside the somehow too-touchy definitional question...which I believe
is not as out of whack as some contend... I do believe that IxDA has
to help us maintain standards and build out the fields of our shared
expertise. As a member of the board, I want to make this happen.

So, what are some of the best means we (IxDA) could employ to
communicate the IxD message & self-definition with recruiters, HR
departments, education, business leaders, etc.?

Cheers,
Liz

On Feb 21, 2008, at 2:43 PM, Brett Ingram wrote:

> Which brings me to the original question in this discussion thread.
> What I haven't really seen anyone write is that the reason it is hard
> to find designers might be because we are happily employed and not in
> the market for a job.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Director, IxDA / www.ixda.org
CDO, Devise / www.devise.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments

21 Feb 2008 - 7:33pm
Mark Schraad
2006

The only profession I see in a more unbalanced demand/supply position
is the SEO specialist.

On Feb 21, 2008, at 8:15 PM, Elizabeth Bacon wrote:

> There are simply more jobs than IxDs right now. We're all engaged in
> solving interesting problems, and the world is exploding with yet
> more possibilities.
>
>

21 Feb 2008 - 7:43pm
Gary Barber
2008

Have people considered that the current lack of good developers in the
market place has meant that graduates upwards have been focusing on the
development end of the process and not the design end.

I'm often coming across fellow freelance IxDs that basically are
retraining as developers as they can't find work in the design field but
are seeing developers in great demand and often earning up to twice the
pay packet.

This also comes to the issue of availability of good professional
training for for IxDs. In many places its just not available at all.

IxD is also often seen as the "anyone" can do that end of the
developmental cycle.

--
Gary Barber
Freelance User Interaction Designer / Information Architect

web: radharc.com.au
blog: manwithnoblog.com

Elizabeth Bacon wrote:
> There are simply more jobs than IxDs right now. We're all engaged in
> solving interesting problems, and the world is exploding with yet
> more possibilities.
>
> The fear I share with others is that we all face a serious
> professional issue if unqualified folks fill IxD shoes and cause
> industry to sour on our discipline. I'm thinking that facing outward
> and being more direct with industry is crucial for IxDA. Leaving
> aside the somehow too-touchy definitional question...which I believe
> is not as out of whack as some contend... I do believe that IxDA has
> to help us maintain standards and build out the fields of our shared
> expertise. As a member of the board, I want to make this happen.
>
> So, what are some of the best means we (IxDA) could employ to
> communicate the IxD message & self-definition with recruiters, HR
> departments, education, business leaders, etc.?
>
> Cheers,
> Liz
>
>
> On Feb 21, 2008, at 2:43 PM, Brett Ingram wrote:
>
>
>> Which brings me to the original question in this discussion thread.
>> What I haven't really seen anyone write is that the reason it is hard
>> to find designers might be because we are happily employed and not in
>> the market for a job.
>>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Director, IxDA / www.ixda.org
> CDO, Devise / www.devise.com
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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>

21 Feb 2008 - 8:45pm
Scott McDaniel
2007

Totally.
I've been asked, pressured and made to take courses in development
because it's not
quite as easy to make a direct Microsoft Project statement on how some design
matters in the end. A more usable or beautiful end result is harder
to prove in a countdown
of hours and money for a client project.

Damnit :-|

Scott

On Thu, Feb 21, 2008 at 8:43 PM, Gary Barber <gary.barber.au at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Have people considered that the current lack of good developers in the
> market place has meant that graduates upwards have been focusing on the
> development end of the process and not the design end.
>
> I'm often coming across fellow freelance IxDs that basically are
> retraining as developers as they can't find work in the design field but
> are seeing developers in great demand and often earning up to twice the
> pay packet.
>
> This also comes to the issue of availability of good professional
> training for for IxDs. In many places its just not available at all.
>
> IxD is also often seen as the "anyone" can do that end of the
> developmental cycle.

'Life' plus 'significance' = magic. ~ Grant Morrison

22 Feb 2008 - 6:40am
Anonymous

You don't have to change your focus from design to development. Find an
industry where design matters or a corporation that values design as a
differentiator. There is no lack of these industries or corporations, and
the list is growing.

If I was building web sites for small clients who have few $$ and a no
inhouse dev staff, and they wanted everything yesterday and the value to
their business was having a web site at all, not in it leading the market
place....then of course, I would hire that extra developer versus a
designer. This is a "well duh" situation as a designer, and you shoud move
on.
Lastly, there are product areas where design doesn't enable "make it
better" attributes (useable/beautiful). Design is the product, it is the
thing itself you are buying, it enables the creation. I think the iphone is
a good example. It is not a phone. It is a new product category...most
similar to the PDA, but through design I think it breaks through into
something other than that...which is mainstream.

On Thu, Feb 21, 2008 at 9:45 PM, Scott McDaniel <scott at scottopic.com> wrote:

> matters in the end. A more usable or beautiful end result is harder
> to prove in a countdown
> of hours and money for a client project.
>
> Damnit :-|
>
> Scott
>
>

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