Interaction Design and Theatre

19 Feb 2008 - 11:24am
6 years ago
26 replies
2105 reads
Maria De Monte
2008

Hello,

just wondering... does anyone of you has information about interaction design studies applied to theatre?
I've tried to put up a show using human-machine interaction principles a couple years ago, and the results were astonishing.
I'd like to keep on working in this sense of direction. Anything in Dublin, Ireland?

Thanks,

Maria :-)

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Comments

19 Feb 2008 - 2:03pm
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

Hello!

What do you mean when you say that you put on a show using HCI?

You incorporated HCI in the script of the play that you wrote, and
perhaps also in the stage instructions to the set designers and the
director?

Or:

You were yourself the director and/or the set designer and you
incorporated HCI in your work, using an existing play?

Or is it all of the above all together?

Alain Vaillancourt

--- Maria De Monte <mtdemonte at yahoo.it> a écrit :

> Hello,
>
> just wondering... does anyone of you has information about
> interaction design studies applied to theatre?
> I've tried to put up a show using human-machine interaction
> principles a couple years ago, and the results were astonishing.
> I'd like to keep on working in this sense of direction. Anything in
> Dublin, Ireland?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Maria :-)
>
>
>
>
> ___________________________________
> L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo!
> Mail: http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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>

Alain Vaillancourt

ndgmtlcd at yahoo.com

Découvrez les styles qui font sensation sur Yahoo! Québec Avatars.
http://cf.avatars.yahoo.com/

19 Feb 2008 - 4:32pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Hi Maria,

I'm more familiar with this working the other way around; applying
theatrical principles to interface design. Brenda Laurel's
_Computers as Theater_ comes to mind:

http://www.amazon.com/Computers-as-Theatre-Brenda-Laurel/dp/0201550601

Many human-machine interaction principles are derived from older
social interaction principles, so you could work back up the chain
and consider how to apply something like Erving Goffman's
interaction framework of 1) Initiation, 2) Maintenance and 3)
Leavetaking to a theatrical performance, though theater is a more
mature field and the principles wouldn't exactly come as a shock.

I'd be interested in hearing about how you incorporated the
principles in your previous show.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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19 Feb 2008 - 5:23pm
Patrick G
2006

Not sure if this is the kind of thing you are thinking of, but Troika
Ranch is a dance/theater company that focuses on interactive
performances. I believe they have even developed their own software
for such purposes:

http://www.troikaranch.org/

There's also a Yahoo! Group run by students in the Performance and
Interactive Media Arts program at Brooklyn College:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pimatalk/

On Feb 19, 2008, at 11:24 AM, Maria De Monte wrote:

> Hello,
>
> just wondering... does anyone of you has information about
> interaction design studies applied to theatre?
> I've tried to put up a show using human-machine interaction
> principles a couple years ago, and the results were astonishing.
> I'd like to keep on working in this sense of direction. Anything in
> Dublin, Ireland?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Maria :-)
>
>
>
>
> ___________________________________
> L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo!
> Mail: http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

19 Feb 2008 - 1:46pm
Anthony Hempell
2007

You might want to get really old school and check out Brenda Laurel's
"Computers As Theatre". It's a blast from the past, but at its time
way ahead of everything else.

http://www.amazon.com/Computers-as-Theatre-Brenda-Laurel/dp/0201550601

There's quite a bit of crossover from the theatre --> interaction
design direction (Aristotle's Poetics are a staple of a lot of
introductory interaction studies) but I'm not as familiar with the
other way around.

On 19-Feb-08, at 8:24 AM, Maria De Monte wrote:

>
> Hello,
>
> just wondering... does anyone of you has information about
> interaction design studies applied to theatre?
> I've tried to put up a show using human-machine interaction
> principles a couple years ago, and the results were astonishing.
> I'd like to keep on working in this sense of direction. Anything in
> Dublin, Ireland?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Maria :-)
>

19 Feb 2008 - 2:49pm
Andrew Milmoe
2007

These organizations are in New York, but they are very open and friendly. great champions of interaction design in theater.

http://www.troikaranch.org/

http://www.gertstein.org/

Feel free to contact both of them (and tell them I sent you!) they should be able to point you towards conferences or organizations in your area.

-Andrew

_ __ ___ ____ _____
Andrew G. Milmoe
www.milmoe.com
www.makesf.org
Sr. Information Architect
AA|Razorfish - San Francisco

----------------------------------------

From: Maria De Monte <mtdemonte at yahoo.it>
Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2008 10:40 AM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre

Hello,

just wondering... does anyone of you has information about interaction design studies applied to theatre?
I've tried to put up a show using human-machine interaction principles a couple years ago, and the results were astonishing.
I'd like to keep on working in this sense of direction. Anything in Dublin, Ireland?

Thanks,

Maria :-)

___________________________________
L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo! Mail: http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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19 Feb 2008 - 2:49pm
Séamus T. Byrne
2010

Hi Maria,

I have no knowledge of information pertaining directly to interaction
design and theatre, but if you haven't already done so, I recommend
reading:

"Computers as Theatre" by Brenda Laurel
http://www.amazon.com/Computers-as-Theatre-Brenda-Laurel/dp/0201550601

Personally, I find that some principles from stage direction to be very
relevant and applicable to interface visual design. Concepts such as
"selection" and "emphasis" and "levels" help me understand designing
within space and therefore lend themselves very well to the informed
placement of UI elements. After all, a screen has similar
characteristics to the traditional proscenium stage.

--
All the Best,

Seamus Byrne
Senior User Experience Designer

WestGlobal Ltd
Dublin, Ireland

Mobl: 087 618 5655

Maria De Monte wrote:
> Hello,
>
> just wondering... does anyone of you has information about interaction design studies applied to theatre?
> I've tried to put up a show using human-machine interaction principles a couple years ago, and the results were astonishing.
> I'd like to keep on working in this sense of direction. Anything in Dublin, Ireland?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Maria :-)
>
>
>
>
> ___________________________________
> L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo! Mail: http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>
>

19 Feb 2008 - 8:55pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Triple jinx!

Anthony Hempell wrote:
> You might want to get really old school and check out
> Brenda Laurel's "Computers As Theatre".

Seamus Byrne wrote:
> I recommend reading: "Computers as Theatre" by Brenda
> Laurel.

Jeff Howard wrote:
> Brenda Laurel's _Computers as Theater_ comes to mind.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=26112

20 Feb 2008 - 5:17am
Chauncey Wilson
2007

There are many articles on applying concepts from theatre to the
design of products. There are several approaches. The Brenda Laurel
approach was to consider the metaphor of "theater" as a guiding
metaphor for the design of software products. That is quite a good
metaphor (stage, backstage, audience, supporting cast, cue cards,
narrative....)

The other approach is to integrate aspects of theater into the our
methods and design process. There are many articles in the ACM
Digital Library, example, on methods that are based in acting,
role-playing, and other theater techniques. Some of the terms used in
the literature include: role-playing, informance, interface theater,
bodystorming, dramaturgy,

A lot of the early work on participatory design involved role playing
to understand task flows and the needs of users and also to envision
how a future design might affect the overall work practices.

I think that training in improv is quite useful since in our work we
often have to think quickly on our feet, ask good question, and show
concern and interest while not biasing the person. I've never quite
gotten to an improv course, but have read on the topic and think that
some practice would be good for interaction designers and usability
practitioners (and all the other related job titles that we argue
about a lot).

Here are some references related to "theater methods and approaches".

Boess, S., Saakes, D., and Hummels, C. 2007. When is role playing
really experiential?: case studies. In Proceedings of the 1st
international Conference on Tangible and Embedded interaction (Baton
Rouge, Louisiana, February 15 - 17, 2007). TEI '07. ACM Press, New
York, NY, 279-282.

Buchenau, M. and Suri, J. F. 2000. Experience prototyping. In
Proceedings of the Conference on Designing interactive Systems:
Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques (New York City, New
York, United States, August 17 - 19, 2000). D. Boyarski and W. A.
Kellogg, Eds. DIS '00. ACM Press, New York, NY, 424-433. DOI=
http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/347642.347802

Eden, H., Scharff, E., and Hornecker, E. 2002. Multilevel design and
role play: experiences in assessing support for neighborhood
participation in design. In Proceedings of the Conference on Designing
interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques
(London, England, June 25 - 28, 2002). DIS '02. ACM Press, New York,
NY, 387-392.

Kankainen, T., Kantola, V., Mehto, K., and Tiitta, S. 2005.
Interactive drama and user centered product concept design. In
Proceedings of the 2005 Conference on Designing For User Experience
(San Francisco, California, November 03 - 05, 2005). ACM International
Conference Proceeding Series, vol. 135. AIGA: American Institute of
Graphic Arts, New York, NY, 48.

Kantola, V., Tiitta, S., Mehto, K., and Kankainen, T. 2007. Using
dramaturgical methods to gain more dynamic user understanding in
user-centered design. In Proceedings of the 6th ACM SIGCHI Conference
on Creativity &Amp; Cognition (Washington, DC, USA, June 13 - 15,
2007). C&C '07. ACM Press, New York, NY, 173-182. DOI=
http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1254960.1254985

Seland, G. 2006. System designer assessments of role play as a design
method: a qualitative study. In Proceedings of the 4th Nordic
Conference on Human-Computer interaction: Changing Roles (Oslo,
Norway, October 14 - 18, 2006). A. Mørch, K. Morgan, T. Bratteteig, G.
Ghosh, and D. Svanaes, Eds. NordiCHI '06, vol. 189. ACM Press, New
York, NY, 222-231.

Simsarian, K. T. 2003. Take it to the next stage: the roles of role
playing in the design process. In CHI '03 Extended Abstracts on Human
Factors in Computing Systems (Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA, April 05 -
10, 2003). CHI '03. ACM Press, New York, NY, 1012-1013. DOI=
http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/765891.766123

Svanaes, D. and Seland, G. 2004. Putting the users center stage: role
playing and low-fi prototyping enable end users to design mobile
systems. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in
Computing Systems (Vienna, Austria, April 24 -
29, 2004). CHI '04. ACM Press, New York, NY, 479-486.

Wakkary, R., Poon, M., Maestri, L., Kirton, T., Julihn, C., and Betts,
R. 2007. How informances can be used in design ethnography. In CHI '07
Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (San Jose,
CA, USA, April 28 - May 03, 2007). CHI '07. ACM Press, New York, NY,
1875-1880. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1240866.1240914

Woltjer, R., Trnka, J., Lundberg, J., and Johansson, B. 2006.
Role-playing exercises to strengthen the resilience of command and
control systems. In Proceedings of the 13th Eurpoean Conference on
Cognitive Ergonomics: Trust and Control in Complex Socio-Technical
Systems (Zurich, Switzerland, September 20 - 22, 2006). ECCE '06, vol.
250. ACM Press, New York, NY, 71-78.

Chauncey

On Feb 19, 2008 11:24 AM, Maria De Monte <mtdemonte at yahoo.it> wrote:
> Hello,
>
> just wondering... does anyone of you has information about interaction design studies applied to theatre?
> I've tried to put up a show using human-machine interaction principles a couple years ago, and the results were astonishing.
> I'd like to keep on working in this sense of direction. Anything in Dublin, Ireland?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Maria :-)
>
>
>
>
> ___________________________________
> L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo! Mail: http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

20 Feb 2008 - 6:36pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Here's another example that connects Interaction Design and Theatre.
The London premiere of Peter Pan in 1904. Captain Hook has poisoned
Tinkerbell and she's near death. Peter Pan turns to the audience and
implores them to clap if they believe in fairies in order to save her
life.

Today that sort of interaction isn't uncommon (American Idol) but it
took a lot of guts to pull it off in 1904.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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21 Feb 2008 - 9:08am
ariel comstock
2008

Might also see if Design Research, edited by Brenda Laurel might be useful for you...

http://www.tauzero.com/Brenda_Laurel/DesignResearch/DesignResearch.html

ariel ~

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Howard
Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2008 9:36 AM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre

Here's another example that connects Interaction Design and Theatre.
The London premiere of Peter Pan in 1904. Captian Hook has poisoned Tinkerbell and she's near death. Peter Pan turns to the audience and implores them to clap if they believe in fairies in order to save her life.

Today that sort of interaction isn't uncommon (American Idol) but it took a lot of guts to pull it off in 1904.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=26112

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

22 Feb 2008 - 10:31am
Maria De Monte
2008

Sorry for being a little late in replying, but I was kinda busy
keeping track of your replies and direction... so first of all,
thank you all for your suggestions. I will surely go straight on
reading Brenda Laurel's books and Chauncey Wilson's detailed list
of articles.

Jeff Howard exactly got my point citing the Peter Pan premiere in
1904, a little less with American Idol ( as I understood, a TV
programme). Just, I wouldn't put them on the same level, as TV comes
to you, while theatre is something you should go after.

In a theatrical interaction, there is the stage, normally sitting in
front of you, and an audience, sitting in front of the actors.
This kind of division is necessary to the existence of theatre (as
any kind of interaction), as two parts must communicate to each other
without loosing their identity.

Now, what often comes in theatrical interaction, is that the message
of the show does not really arrive to the audience. They could be hit
by the appearance of the show, the quality of the actors, the lights,
the screens or whatever, but the content could remain unexpressed.

This kind of challenge is what I think makes theatre and interaction
design communicate. The latest research in theatrical field ( at
least those from which I come from) goes in the direction of
manipulating the acting space and merge it with the audience.
Audience would be "on stage", or at least very close to the actors,
so close that they could even touch them.

This doesn't normally comes true. Audience stays in their place and
I would be curious to know if they really did clap their hand to save
Tinkerbell, however, I believe the use of technology on stage could
help in the direction of putting the audience in a non-conscious
active situation ( like that of their shadow on a wall projection)
and let the actor play with this to "touch" their audience without
being touched.

This poses another question about the results of this tryadic
interaction between actors, audience and machine.

Did I lost flew away from the focus???

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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22 Feb 2008 - 10:36am
Maria De Monte
2008

Alain, I mean keeping in mind HCI while writing the script, using
videos, recorder music, mic, projections as actors in the play, and
well...

So I would say probably the best anwer to
'You incorporated HCI in the script of the play that you wrote, and
perhaps also in the stage instructions to the set designers and the
director?

Or:

You were yourself the director and/or the set designer and you
incorporated HCI in your work, using an existing play?

Or is it all of the above all together?'

Would be much of the last one.... ;-)

Cheers

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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22 Feb 2008 - 10:45am
Maria De Monte
2008

Andrew, Patrick... I am contacting thos who you signaled... I'll post
what comes up next...

Thanks once more...

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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29 Feb 2008 - 8:12am
Maria De Monte
2008

Hello N...

yes, your hint was very interesting... Actually I'm still exploring the domains of application of my ideas about theatre and Interaction Design.
As I can see so far, they still obey to apparently different laws, for what they have many points in common and would have a lot to exchange.

Still searching....

Thank you again

___________________________________
L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo! Mail: http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html

29 Feb 2008 - 3:21pm
Traci Lepore
2008

Hi,

Yes, as already stated Brenda Laurel's Computer's as Theater is a great resource. This is an area of interest to me as well, studying theater education with a desire to work translating the theory and techniques of theater to design processess. There are some great CHI papers around using theater, and participatory design using role playing and games. Something I've been looking at and thinking about too is looking at material like Peter Brook's The Empty Space because the theory would translate to any creative form. Also look at people doing organizational development using Improv

Some resources:
http://www.personneltoday.com/articles/2006/05/17/35703/using-the-actor-factor-drama-based-training.html

Boal, A. (1992). Introduction. Games for Actors and Nonactors. Routledge.

http://www.impactfactory.com/p/forum_theatre_skills_training/issues_1230-2105-79677.html

http://www.actorsmeanbusiness.co.uk/

http://www.impro.org.uk/rehe.html

Saner, R. (1999). Organizational Consulting What a Gestalt Approach Can Learn from Off Off Broadway Theater. Published in Gestalt Review 3(1):6-21

Traci Lepore
Graphic Designer
traci106 at hotmail.com
617-821-2156

> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 13:12:50 +0000
> From: mtdemonte at yahoo.it
> To: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre
>
> Hello N...
>
> yes, your hint was very interesting... Actually I'm still exploring the domains of application of my ideas about theatre and Interaction Design.
> As I can see so far, they still obey to apparently different laws, for what they have many points in common and would have a lot to exchange.
>
> Still searching....
>
> Thank you again
>
>
> ___________________________________
> L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo! Mail: http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

1 Mar 2008 - 12:13pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

"IxD as Choreography" - Perhaps a related vector?

At one point - about 25 years ago - looked into something called
"labanotation" as a potential tool for the unique needs of the emerging
discipline of IxD. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labanotation (movement
notation / dance notation)

The metaphor of "the dance of interaction" resonated. Spatial dynamism,
etc. Just a thought.

John Vaughan
The Communication Studio LLC
website: http://www.jcvtcs.com

In the vein of "participatory design" using collaborative gaming technique,
there's always Buckminster Fuller's Worldgame
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Game

----- Original Message -----
From: "traci lepore" <traci106 at hotmail.com>
To: "Maria De Monte" <mtdemonte at yahoo.it>; <discuss at ixda.org>
Sent: Friday, February 29, 2008 3:21 PM
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre

> Hi,
>
> Yes, as already stated Brenda Laurel's Computer's as Theater is a great
> resource. This is an area of interest to me as well, studying theater
> education with a desire to work translating the theory and techniques of
> theater to design processess. There are some great CHI papers around
> using theater, and participatory design using role playing and games.
> Something I've been looking at and thinking about too is looking at
> material like Peter Brook's The Empty Space because the theory would
> translate to any creative form. Also look at people doing organizational
> development using Improv
>
> Some resources:
> http://www.personneltoday.com/articles/2006/05/17/35703/using-the-actor-factor-drama-based-training.html
>
> Boal, A. (1992). Introduction. Games for Actors and Nonactors. Routledge.
>
> http://www.impactfactory.com/p/forum_theatre_skills_training/issues_1230-2105-79677.html
>
> http://www.actorsmeanbusiness.co.uk/
>
> http://www.impro.org.uk/rehe.html
>
> Saner, R. (1999). Organizational Consulting What a Gestalt Approach Can
> Learn from Off Off Broadway Theater. Published in Gestalt Review 3(1):6-21
>
>
> Traci Lepore
> Graphic Designer
> traci106 at hotmail.com
> 617-821-2156
>
>> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 13:12:50 +0000
>> From: mtdemonte at yahoo.it
>> To: discuss at ixda.org
>> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre
>>
>> Hello N...
>>
>> yes, your hint was very interesting... Actually I'm still exploring the
>> domains of application of my ideas about theatre and Interaction Design.
>> As I can see so far, they still obey to apparently different laws, for
>> what they have many points in common and would have a lot to exchange.
>>
>> Still searching....
>>
>> Thank you again
>>
>>
>> ___________________________________
>> L'email della prossima generazione? Puoi averla con la nuova Yahoo! Mail:
>> http://it.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

3 Mar 2008 - 7:50am
whitneyq
2010

I've written a couple of articles on the relationship between my work
in UX and my work as a theatrical lighting designer (from a 30 foot
stage to a 17 inch screen....)

http://www.wqusability.com/articles/theatre-interactions.html
http://www.boxesandarrows.com/archives/002325.php

Labanotation is an interesting notation system for dance, as it
documents not just movement in space, but also the "shape" of the
effort. It's incredibly detailed. Here's an example from the Dance
Notation Bureau -http://www.dancenotation.org/lnbasics/frame0.html

The Peter Brook Empty Space work is a very rich metaphor to work with.
Although this classification of theatre into Deadly, Holy, Rough,
Immediate... is interesting, his work on the dynamics of a production
is more relevant. He talks about different types of directors, and
points out that (counterintuitively), the Deadly Director can
sometimes produce great work because s/he unites the actors in
salvaging the production.

You might also be interested in a book on collaboration, "Artful
Making: What Managers Need to Know About How Artists Work" written by
Lee Devin (a theatre director) and Harvard Business School professor
Robert Austin

On Sat, Mar 1, 2008 at 12:13 PM, John Vaughan <vaughan1 at optonline.net> wrote:
> "IxD as Choreography" - Perhaps a related vector?
>
> At one point - about 25 years ago - looked into something called
> "labanotation" as a potential tool for the unique needs of the emerging
> discipline of IxD. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labanotation (movement
> notation / dance notation)
>
> The metaphor of "the dance of interaction" resonated. Spatial dynamism,
> etc. Just a thought.
>
> John Vaughan
> The Communication Studio LLC
> website: http://www.jcvtcs.com
>
> In the vein of "participatory design" using collaborative gaming technique,
> there's always Buckminster Fuller's Worldgame
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Game
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "traci lepore" <traci106 at hotmail.com>
> To: "Maria De Monte" <mtdemonte at yahoo.it>; <discuss at ixda.org>
> Sent: Friday, February 29, 2008 3:21 PM
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre
>
>
> > Hi,
> >
> > Yes, as already stated Brenda Laurel's Computer's as Theater is a great
> > resource. This is an area of interest to me as well, studying theater
> > education with a desire to work translating the theory and techniques of
> > theater to design processess. There are some great CHI papers around
> > using theater, and participatory design using role playing and games.
> > Something I've been looking at and thinking about too is looking at
> > material like Peter Brook's The Empty Space because the theory would
> > translate to any creative form. Also look at people doing organizational
> > development using Improv
> >
> > Some resources:
> > http://www.personneltoday.com/articles/2006/05/17/35703/using-the-actor-factor-drama-based-training.html
> >
> > Boal, A. (1992). Introduction. Games for Actors and Nonactors. Routledge.
> >
> > http://www.impactfactory.com/p/forum_theatre_skills_training/issues_1230-2105-79677.html
> >
> > http://www.actorsmeanbusiness.co.uk/
> >
> > http://www.impro.org.uk/rehe.html
> >
> > Saner, R. (1999). Organizational Consulting What a Gestalt Approach Can
> > Learn from Off Off Broadway Theater. Published in Gestalt Review 3(1):6-21
> >
> >
> > Traci Lepore
> > Graphic Designer
> > traci106 at hotmail.com
> > 617-821-2156
> >
> >> Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 13:12:50 +0000
> >> From: mtdemonte at yahoo.it
> >> To: discuss at ixda.org
> >> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre
> >>
> >> Hello N...
> >>
> >> yes, your hint was very interesting... Actually I'm still exploring the
> >> domains of application of my ideas about theatre and Interaction Design.
> >> As I can see so far, they still obey to apparently different laws, for
> >> what they have many points in common and would have a lot to exchange.
> >>
> >> Still searching....
> >>
> >> Thank you again
> >>
> >>
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>
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--
Whitney Quesenbery
www.wqusability.com

3 Mar 2008 - 8:30am
Dave Malouf
2005

I've written two articles that takes the analogy of choreography to
interaction design. One was in "interactions" about 2 years and the
other is in my Boxes & Arrows article on foundations of interaction
design that came out a couple of months ago.

The premise is that whether it is movies, theatre, dance, etc. The
direction of many craft specialties towards the sole purpose of
generating a single narrative is what interaction design at its core
is all about.

Recently, I've upped my exposure to dance believe it or not on TV.
Yup! there is this amazing summertime reality TV show/context called,
"So you think you can dance" brought to you by none-other-than the
folks that make American Idol. It is a gazillion times better, IMHO.
But the real point is that you REALLY get to see how the dancer is
often at the mercy of the choreographer, and the choreographer is
often at the mercy of the dancer, musicians, lighting design, etc. It
is a great introduction to dance, and a well its been some of the best
entertainment I've seen on TV in a long time. Just put it on the DVR
and fast forward through the Reality TV bullshit. ;)

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=26112

3 Mar 2008 - 11:38am
Michael Micheletti
2006

On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 4:50 AM, Whitney Quesenbery <whitneyq at gmail.com>
wrote:

> Labanotation is an interesting notation system for dance, as it
> documents not just movement in space, but also the "shape" of the
> effort. It's incredibly detailed. Here's an example from the Dance
> Notation Bureau -http://www.dancenotation.org/lnbasics/frame0.html
>
>

Old ghost time: in an earlier career as a dance accompanist I worked with
several teachers and choreographers who were trained and certified in
Labanotation and the related effort-shape exercises. My observation was that
the notation was excruciating, both to create and even more so to interpret.
One resuscitation from notation of an early modern dance piece took weeks of
trial and error. The notation didn't seem to catch on much with the dance
students - I don't remember that any of them went on to Laban certification
school.

The related effort-shape exercises were absorbed by everyone though. They
were designed to get the body moving in 3D space, along diagonals, in
specific ways. I still do some at the gym to cool down and stretch.

The exercises related well to everyone in the class (even the musician!), so
we learned them. The notation was interesting in a remote sort of way, but a
bit too peripheral to the exhausting experience of training to be a dancer
to really catch fire. I later created several scores for pieces in
collaboration with choreographers certified in Labanotation and didn't see
it get used much in the real-world chaos of setting a piece on dancers.

I dread the day something as intellectually rigorous and challenging as
Labanotation is head-nodded all around for documenting system interactions.
That evolutionary branch of IxD will dead-end as an academic backwater, much
as Labanotation has in the dance community. The rest of us will move along
and design stuff.

Michael Micheletti

4 Mar 2008 - 3:34am
Diego Moya
2005

On 03/03/2008, Michael Micheletti <michael.micheletti en gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 4:50 AM, Whitney Quesenbery <whitneyq en gmail.com>
> wrote:
> I dread the day something as intellectually rigorous and challenging as
> Labanotation is head-nodded all around for documenting system
> interactions.
> That evolutionary branch of IxD will dead-end as an academic backwater,
> much
> as Labanotation has in the dance community. The rest of us will move along
> and design stuff.

I wonder if this notation could be reworked through the "Cognitive
dimensions" design space ( see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dimensions ), in order to produce
more user-friendly alternate notations adapted to different contexts.

I don't know much about dance nor movement notations, but I recall seeing in
Tufte's books some old dancing diagrams based on footsteps and mannequins
that had a much lower abstraction level. Surely an expert designer with
dancing knowledge could produce a more usable formalism to represent body
movement?

7 Mar 2008 - 1:37pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

As the guy who initiated the "labanotation" reference:

A) Agreed - It's really complex & cumbersome.
B) Anything can be done badly.
but
C) It's interesting & relevant because it's an attempt to capture the
dynamics of interaction - in a ll its relativity and complexity.

That said; Visio diagrams - limited as they are - remain as the convention
du jour for our discipline. We can do better. Glad to see the discussion
here...

----- Original Message -----
From: "Diego Moya" <turingt at gmail.com>
To: "Michael Micheletti" <michael.micheletti at gmail.com>
Cc: <discuss at ixda.org>
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2008 3:34 AM
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Interaction Design and Theatre

> On 03/03/2008, Michael Micheletti <michael.micheletti at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 4:50 AM, Whitney Quesenbery <whitneyq at gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>> I dread the day something as intellectually rigorous and challenging as
>> Labanotation is head-nodded all around for documenting system
>> interactions.
>> That evolutionary branch of IxD will dead-end as an academic backwater,
>> much
>> as Labanotation has in the dance community. The rest of us will move
>> along
>> and design stuff.
>
>
> I wonder if this notation could be reworked through the "Cognitive
> dimensions" design space ( see
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dimensions ), in order to produce
> more user-friendly alternate notations adapted to different contexts.
>
> I don't know much about dance nor movement notations, but I recall seeing
> in
> Tufte's books some old dancing diagrams based on footsteps and mannequins
> that had a much lower abstraction level. Surely an expert designer with
> dancing knowledge could produce a more usable formalism to represent body
> movement?
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

7 Mar 2008 - 2:31pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Regarding notations.
I have been doing some work in gestures and find notation as a great
cataloging tool, with minimal success in communicating. it is more of
a "me" tool, that I use to help me know what I've covered already
in trying to create a language of motion and it also helps me develop
the actual semantics and syntax themselves.

See some public (open source stuff; I had nothing to do with) here:
http://nuigroup.com/forums/viewthread/95/

As for other forms of notation more relevant to GUI, what do people
think of Jesse James Garrett's Visual Vocabulary for Information
Architecture: http://www.jjg.net/ia/visvocab/
Can this be expanded upon for better use with interaction design?
I've used it back when I was doing mostly content sites, but
haven't dragged it along with me into my current role.

Thoughts?

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=26112

7 Mar 2008 - 4:05pm
Jeff Howard
2004

I've been doing some research into notation for a related discipline
and came across a great presentation by Ralf Koster on a grammar of
notation for game design.

http://www.theoryoffun.com/grammar/gdc2005.htm

He hasn't succeeded in creating an orthagraphy yet so it's not
terribly useful as a creation tool but "then again, most people in
other art forms do not use straight notation to initially create
things either. They rely heavily on iteration and experience.
Notation is a capture tool primarily."

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=26112

8 Mar 2008 - 12:11am
martinpolley
2007

Hi Dave,

> As for other forms of notation more relevant to GUI, what do people
>
think of Jesse James Garrett's Visual Vocabulary for Information
> Architecture: http://www.jjg.net/ia/visvocab/
> Can this be expanded upon for better use with interaction design?
> I've used it back when I was doing mostly content sites, but
> haven't dragged it along with me into my current role.
>

In Anthony Colfelt's presentation at UX Week 2007, he talked about expanding the Visual Vocabulary for RIAs.

http://uxweek2007.adaptivepath.com/sessions/visual-vocabulary-for-rich-i...

Hope this is useful,

--
Martin Polley
Technical Communicator
+972 52 3864280
<http://capcloud.com/>

9 Mar 2008 - 9:20am
whitneyq
2010

On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 9:24 AM, John Vaughan <vaughan1 at optonline.net> wrote:
> Unfortunately, your "boxes & arrows" link is broken.

Thanks, John. The correct link is
http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/when_the_show_must_go_on_its_time_to_collaborate_or_die

I won't even comment on the irony of an IA publication breaking all
its links. (Is that the ghost of Xanadu turning over?)

> Which begs the classic IA/UxP/IxD question: "So, are you a Technician or an
> Artist?"

I prefer "craft" vs. "art". The difference is in the goal: Artists
create to please themselves, with accurate or authentic
self-expression one of the important "tests" of the finished work.
Craftspersons create things that others will use. Their work is judged
on both utility and all the subtle and ineffable qualities that raise
the work out of the mundane.

Randy Pausch posited a similar relationship between Design/Engineering
and Art/Science.

A quote from British playwright Alan Ayckbourn goes something like
this: "When I give a bloke a tea tray to carry across the stage, I try
to give him enough lines to get there."

--
Whitney Quesenbery
www.wqusability.com

9 Mar 2008 - 5:05pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

"Jeff Howard" wrote
> I've been doing some research into notation for a related discipline
> and came across a great presentation by Ralf Koster on a grammar of
> notation for game design.
>
> http://www.theoryoffun.com/grammar/gdc2005.htm
>
> He hasn't succeeded in creating an orthagraphy yet so it's not
> terribly useful as a creation tool but "then again, most people in
> other art forms do not use straight notation to initially create
> things either. They rely heavily on iteration and experience.
> Notation is a capture tool primarily."

Interesting link + a valuable insight about the practical role of notation
systems.

...and I've often found myself thinking that the public's expectation of
"game-quality interaction" is the primary justification for our craft.
Dancin' & playin'. (I feel better already)

John

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