look and feel

11 Feb 2008 - 2:25pm
6 years ago
8 replies
466 reads
Mark Schraad
2006

There is an interesting editorial and follow up discussion regarding the
term 'look and feel' - at the design observer (mostly a graph design blog).
I have used the term many times when speaking to clients. To me it is
everything about the site that is visual, except for the interactions.
http://www.designobserver.com/archives/032084.html#comments

Comments

11 Feb 2008 - 2:35pm
SemanticWill
2007

>From the post:
"Brands are about ideas not just logos, 'look and feel' refers to the
brand's supporting graphic elements, typography, colour palette, material
palette, photographic style etc, these are elements that can help
communicate the brand message or story."

Yeah - I disagree. I don't think the term "look and feel" signifies all
those complex concepts. I don't think clueless clients think about the term
"look and feel," and think about all the various intertwingled elements of a
complete brand/identity strategy. Voice, palette, logotype, style guide,
story, emotives, comprehensive experiences from call centers to physical
spaces is much much bigger than just look and feel. Also - people never user
the term to refer to the "look and feel" of packaging, print, tradeshow
booths - it seems to be a website/web application -only term.

On Feb 11, 2008 2:25 PM, mark schraad <mschraad at gmail.com> wrote:

> There is an interesting editorial and follow up discussion regarding the
> term 'look and feel' - at the design observer (mostly a graph design
> blog).
> I have used the term many times when speaking to clients. To me it is
> everything about the site that is visual, except for the interactions.
> http://www.designobserver.com/archives/032084.html#comments
>
> --------

11 Feb 2008 - 2:47pm
Mark Canlas
2003

Look and feel is shallow. In the context of software, look and feel refers
to what skin widgets have. Programmers use it when they talk about Java vs
native widgets. You can have one app and skin it different ways, changing
its "look and feel". To some extent, you could say the various themes of
Windows XP and Winamp change the product's "look and feel", but you don't
hear people say that often. Again, only Java people.

If you look at a content-heavy site like Major League Baseball, you can
see that the information on each team's site is largely the same, and they
differ only in "look and feel", which is the colors, highlighting, and
team logo.

> There is an interesting editorial and follow up discussion regarding the
> term 'look and feel' - at the design observer (mostly a graph design
> blog).
> I have used the term many times when speaking to clients. To me it is
> everything about the site that is visual, except for the interactions.
> http://www.designobserver.com/archives/032084.html#comments

-Mark

11 Feb 2008 - 3:16pm
Angel Marquez
2008

There is some good book refs on that site.

Thanks

11 Feb 2008 - 4:13pm
Anonymous

I highly recommend this presentation by Stephen P Anderson.
http://www.slideshare.net/stephenpa/eye-candy-is-a-critical-business-requirement

On Feb 11, 2008, at 8:25 PM, mark schraad wrote:

> There is an interesting editorial and follow up discussion regarding
> the
> term 'look and feel' - at the design observer (mostly a graph design
> blog).
> I have used the term many times when speaking to clients. To me it is
> everything about the site that is visual, except for the interactions.
> http://www.designobserver.com/archives/032084.html#comments
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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>

11 Feb 2008 - 4:27pm
Zachary Sam Zaiss
2008

I actually like "JL's" comment that you quote... I'm not entirely sure
where the disagreement is. The author isn't saying that look and feel is
equivalent to brand; rather, "these are elements that can help
communicate the brand message or story" (I put the emphasis on help).

I would suggest that look-and-feel is a necessary consideration (but far
from the only one) for promoting brand within an application or website.
Also, by grounding look-and-feel in a branding discussion, you get the
added benefit of adding some objectivity to something that is typically
a flashpoint for everyone's opinions to run amuck.

But hey, my style is always to make the design decisions as objective as
possible... I'm curious how others deal with look-and-feel in client
negotiations, and how they tie it in with branding, if at all.

-Sam

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of W
Evans
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2008 2:36 PM
To: mark schraad
Cc: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] look and feel

>From the post:
"Brands are about ideas not just logos, 'look and feel' refers to the
brand's supporting graphic elements, typography, colour palette,
material
palette, photographic style etc, these are elements that can help
communicate the brand message or story."

Yeah - I disagree. I don't think the term "look and feel" signifies all
those complex concepts. I don't think clueless clients think about the
term
"look and feel," and think about all the various intertwingled elements
of a
complete brand/identity strategy. Voice, palette, logotype, style guide,
story, emotives, comprehensive experiences from call centers to physical
spaces is much much bigger than just look and feel. Also - people never
user
the term to refer to the "look and feel" of packaging, print, tradeshow
booths - it seems to be a website/web application -only term.

On Feb 11, 2008 2:25 PM, mark schraad <mschraad at gmail.com> wrote:

> There is an interesting editorial and follow up discussion regarding
the
> term 'look and feel' - at the design observer (mostly a graph design
> blog).
> I have used the term many times when speaking to clients. To me it is
> everything about the site that is visual, except for the interactions.
> http://www.designobserver.com/archives/032084.html#comments
>
> --------
________________________________________________________________
*Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

11 Feb 2008 - 3:11pm
SemanticWill
2007

Yep - "about the site" - it just seemed that the author wanted it to
refer to the global brand identity instead of simply as Mark just put
it - the "skin" of the application/website.

> To me it is everything about the site that is visual,
> except for the interactions

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=25727

11 Feb 2008 - 3:35pm
Lukeisha Carr
2007

Mark, I must disagree with your comment regarding "... only Java
people".

I learned of the term well before I became a "Java person". In
fact it wasn't even an OOP language, but TCL, HTML, CSS. In fact,
the development team didn't make it up at all. We learned it from
the Business Analyst who also did the interface/interaction designs
for the client facing sites. They often said they were trying to
achieve a certain "look & feel".

I have always interpreted the "look & feel" term to mean that the
"look" refers to aesthetics, such as color, graphics, typography,
and the "feel" to refer to things such as, the user "getting" the
message, ease of use of the site, basically the "feeling" of the
experience.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=25727

12 Feb 2008 - 6:43am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 11 Feb 2008, at 19:47, Mark Canlas wrote:

> Look and feel is shallow. In the context of software, look and feel
> refers
> to what skin widgets have. Programmers use it when they talk about
> Java vs
> native widgets. You can have one app and skin it different ways,
> changing
> its "look and feel". To some extent, you could say the various
> themes of
> Windows XP and Winamp change the product's "look and feel", but you
> don't
> hear people say that often. Again, only Java people.
[snip]

Dunno about other people, but folk I used to work with in the pre-
web, pre-Java days used the term in a more general way (look ==
appearance, feel == intractions) - not just of individual widgets,
but of the whole application. So I guess it depends who you talk to.

Adrian

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