encourage the use of real name

30 Jan 2008 - 3:20pm
6 years ago
5 replies
507 reads
Alvin Woon
2007

As with any social networking applications, the quality of a given social
graph heavily depends on whether your users are using their real name in
their profile. Certain features such as 'people search' won't even be usable
if users don't use real name when signing up.

So the question is how do you encourage user to use their real name instead
of their nickname. We can't really prevent a user from signing up using a
fake/nickname and there's really no way to tell anyway. What kind of
incentive or encouragement we can give user to nudge them towards this area
other than the common privacy reassurances like 'we won't share your contact
info....'?

Please advise.

Kind regards,
Alvin

Comments

30 Jan 2008 - 4:08pm
SemanticWill
2007

You wrote:
"As with any social networking applications, the quality of a given social
graph heavily depends on whether your users are using their real name in
their profile."

*I disagree*. I know some very very vibrant, highly sticky social networking
applications and the quality of the social graph is orthogonal to the %
distribution of real name vs. screen names on the site.

And people search does work - if you search for people based on their screen
name. My mom - a very heavy blogger on a social networking site that I
designed - has deep, rich connections with MANY people - many she only knows
their screen names. I can share more theoretical work with you about
concepts of identity on social networking sites if you are interested.

Peace,

Will

On Jan 30, 2008 3:20 PM, Alvin Woon <alvinwoon at gmail.com> wrote:

> As with any social networking applications, the quality of a given social
> graph heavily depends on whether your users are using their real name in
> their profile. Certain features such as 'people search' won't even be
> usable
> if users don't use real name when signing up.
>
> So the question is how do you encourage user to use their real name
> instead
> of their nickname. We can't really prevent a user from signing up using a
> fake/nickname and there's really no way to tell anyway. What kind of
> incentive or encouragement we can give user to nudge them towards this
> area
> other than the common privacy reassurances like 'we won't share your
> contact
> info....'?
>
> Please advise.
>
> Kind regards,
> Alvin
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"No matter how beautiful,
no matter how cool your interface,
it would be better if there were less of it."
Alan Cooper
-
"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"
-------------------------------------------------------
will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
-------------------------------------------------------

30 Jan 2008 - 4:13pm
Anonymous

To be a member of the Yelp Elite on yelp.com, they require you to use your
real first name and last initial.

Then you can attend Elite only events (the benefit) which almost always
include free cocktails.

On Jan 30, 2008 2:20 PM, Alvin Woon <alvinwoon at gmail.com> wrote:

> As with any social networking applications, the quality of a given social
> graph heavily depends on whether your users are using their real name in
> their profile. Certain features such as 'people search' won't even be
> usable
> if users don't use real name when signing up.
>
> So the question is how do you encourage user to use their real name
> instead
> of their nickname. We can't really prevent a user from signing up using a
> fake/nickname and there's really no way to tell anyway. What kind of
> incentive or encouragement we can give user to nudge them towards this
> area
> other than the common privacy reassurances like 'we won't share your
> contact
> info....'?
>
> Please advise.
>
> Kind regards,
> Alvin
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

30 Jan 2008 - 4:56pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Amazon's product reviews encourage real names by making a big deal
about it with a badge when people use their real name and leveraging
that badge as an indication of credibility. It's a way to show that
the glowing review isn't just a sock-puppet account created by the
author. They link your name with your credit card to determine "real
name" status.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=25347

30 Jan 2008 - 5:18pm
SemanticWill
2007

If - from a business perspective you really need real names - then Jeff's
recommendation is right on - and you need to offer some value - such as
increased reputation (a highly regarded form of currency on SN).

I only disagreed with the base assumption that social networks derive
greater value for other users, and the graph in general - through the use of
real names.
-W

On Wed, 30 Jan 2008 13:56:48, Jeff Howard <id at howardesign.com> wrote:

> Amazon's product reviews encourage real names by making a big deal
> about it with a badge when people use their real name and leveraging
> that badge as an indication of credibility. It's a way to show that
> the glowing review isn't just a sock-puppet account created by the
> author. They link your name with your credit card to determine "real
> name" status.
>
> // jeff
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=25347
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"No matter how beautiful,
no matter how cool your interface,
it would be better if there were less of it."
Alan Cooper
-
"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"
-------------------------------------------------------
will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
-------------------------------------------------------

30 Jan 2008 - 4:24pm
Alvin Woon
2007

>
> And people search does work - if you search for people based on their
> screen name. My mom - a very heavy blogger on a social networking site that
> I designed - has deep, rich connections with MANY people - many she only
> knows their screen names. I can share more theoretical work with you about
> concepts of identity on social networking sites if you are interested.

point taken. But what if the emphasis is on real life relationship? Not the
virtual bloggers, IMs friends or online cooking classmates kind of
relationship, but connecting people like your cousins, high school
classmates or work colleagues, who IMHO, might not know your online
identity.

Syndicate content Get the feed