White boards for tiny fingers

21 Nov 2003 - 3:53pm
10 years ago
12 replies
921 reads
chaxxx at mac.com
2003

hello!

Is anyone aware of whiteboard-like material that comes in a form
(sheets, pages) that can be easily cut-up? For instance, we are
creating buttons, widgets, components to be used for rapid prototyping
with users as well as rapid concept concept generation with internal
teams. Thus, a more durable alternative to the clear transparency
sheets used in paper prototyping.

Thanks,
Chad

---------------------------------------------------------------
Chad Jennings
chaxxx at mac.com
chad at method.com
www.method.com

Comments

21 Nov 2003 - 4:16pm
Challis Hodge
2003

Is anyone aware of whiteboard-like material that comes in a form
(sheets, pages) that can be easily cut-up? For instance, we are
creating buttons, widgets, components to be used for rapid prototyping
with users as well as rapid concept concept generation with internal
teams. Thus, a more durable alternative to the clear transparency
sheets used in paper prototyping.

There are hook and loop or sticky foam type products that can be had from
craft stores or children's learning/science centers. These work well if I
understand your objective correctly. You can build colorcod3ed interface
components, etc.

-challis
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21 Nov 2003 - 4:25pm
Coryndon Luxmoore
2004

We uses these a lot.

http://www.staples.com/Catalog/Browse/Sku.asp?PageType=1&Sku=AVE24391

Not for prototyping per say but for situations where we need to sketch
iteratively and there are not enough whiteboards. They come on a pad and
cling to the wall after you rip them off. They also have the added
benefit of being portable after a design session. Though a good digital
camera has mostly eliminated that need these days.

They could be easily cut if you wanted.

--Coryndon
__________________________________________________________
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Dakasa
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f: 617.292.7704
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21 Nov 2003 - 4:18pm
Pete Gordon - U...
2004

Interesting. I wonder if vinyl would work.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/
eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2573528775&category=46741

> Is anyone aware of whiteboard-like material that comes in a form
> (sheets, pages) that can be easily cut-up?

Hope that helps!

Pete Gordon
Users First
http://www.usersfirst.com
pete at usersfirst.com
p. 614-340-1447
f. 614-340-1449
3492 Wheatfield Dr.
Pickerington, Ohio 43147-8833
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21 Nov 2003 - 4:39pm
vutpakdi
2003

--- chaxxx at mac.com wrote:
> Is anyone aware of whiteboard-like material that comes in a form
> (sheets, pages) that can be easily cut-up? For instance, we are
> creating buttons, widgets, components to be used for rapid prototyping
> with users as well as rapid concept concept generation with internal
> teams. Thus, a more durable alternative to the clear transparency
> sheets used in paper prototyping.

One of my ex-girlfriends once bought some plasticky material that came in
rolls from Home Depot to use as a cheap whiteboard in her classroom. For
the life of me, I can't remember exactly what she bought, but I do remember
that it came in a roll that was fairly easy to cut with the proper shears
and worked well as a whiteboard for the year that she was at that school.

I want to say that it was some sort of light rolled tile, heavy plasticky
wallpaper, or possibly some sort of plastic sheet tile/wallcovering used to
line tub areas. Basically, you want something that has a non-porous
surface.

An alternative would be to take a sheet of posterboard, laminate it, cut it
up into smaller pieces, and then use wet transparency markers on it.

Ron

=====
============================================================================
Ron Vutpakdi
vutpakdi at acm.org

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21 Nov 2003 - 5:18pm
FelcanSmith, Mark
2004

Have used these also for brainstorming sessions...great for
multiple sketchers! That and you can easily move them, like
giganto sticky notes.

---- On Fri, 21 Nov 2003, Coryndon Luxmoore
(cluxmoore at dakasa.com) wrote:

> We uses these a lot.
>
>
http://www.staples.com/Catalog/Browse/Sku.asp?PageType=1&Sku=AVE24391
>
> Not for prototyping per say but for situations where we need
to sketch
> iteratively and there are not enough whiteboards. They come on
a pad and
> cling to the wall after you rip them off. They also have the
added
> benefit of being portable after a design session. Though a
good digital
> camera has mostly eliminated that need these days.
>
> They could be easily cut if you wanted.
>
> --Coryndon
> __________________________________________________________

21 Nov 2003 - 5:57pm
Beth Mazur
2003

I don't know what size folks are talking about, but it occurs to me that,
since whiteboards are typically magnetic, you could probably do cool
prototypes by making widgets out of those magnetic business cards
you can get at Staples or Office Depot. That material is thin enough to
cut, so unless you needed a shape larger than your average biz
card (though I guess you could do something up to the size of a
sheet of them), you'd have a lot of flexibility. And you could print
whatever you want on the front side.

Beth Mazur
IDblog: http://idblog.org

21 Nov 2003 - 8:13pm
chaxxx at mac.com
2003

Yes! This is exactly the type of toolkit we were envisioning. The goal
is to build a reusable, durable, flexible prototyping kit that can be
whipped out for some quick concepting with client and/or design team
and have something to test with users the next day.

There are many options suggested I was not aware of. Thanks for all the
great suggestions.

On Friday, November 21, 2003, at 02:57 PM, Beth Mazur wrote:

> I don't know what size folks are talking about, but it occurs to me
> that,
> since whiteboards are typically magnetic, you could probably do cool
> prototypes by making widgets out of those magnetic business cards
> you can get at Staples or Office Depot. That material is thin enough to
> cut, so unless you needed a shape larger than your average biz
> card (though I guess you could do something up to the size of a
> sheet of them), you'd have a lot of flexibility. And you could print
> whatever you want on the front side.

.

22 Nov 2003 - 3:23am
Mitja Kostomaj
2004

More of a question than a suggestion.

Does anyone ever tried to do such "tiny fingers" paper prototyping
with pop-up mechanisms that one can find in pop-up and movable
books)???

Regards
Mitja Koštomaj

cmc> Yes! This is exactly the type of toolkit we were envisioning. The goal
cmc> is to build a reusable, durable, flexible prototyping kit that can be
cmc> whipped out for some quick concepting with client and/or design team
cmc> and have something to test with users the next day.

cmc> There are many options suggested I was not aware of. Thanks for all the
cmc> great suggestions.

22 Nov 2003 - 5:37pm
Beth Mazur
2003

At 9:23 AM +0100 11/22/03, Mitja Kostomaj wrote:
>Does anyone ever tried to do such "tiny fingers" paper prototyping
>with pop-up mechanisms that one can find in pop-up and movable
>books)???

No, but I was at a usability and e-govt workshop a couple weeks ago,
and a bunch of us liked the simple tool that one presenter had built to
simulate scrolling...just a piece of dark cardstock with a proportionally
sized window cut out of it. This would seem to be a great tool for
doing handheld prototypes. But perhaps this is old hat for those who
do this more frequently than we do!

Beth Mazur
IDblog: http://idblog.org

24 Nov 2003 - 11:10pm
whitneyq
2010

Try:

http://www.magments.com/

They say:
"The kit is a user interface design tool that utilizes predefined magnetic
pieces to represent GUI objects on a magnetic backboard. The magnetic
elements and provided backboard are dry marker friendly (focus group users
have really enjoyed the flexibility) and allow for a lot of different
design possibilities."

At 05:13 PM 11/21/2003 -0800, chaxxx at mac.com wrote:
>Yes! This is exactly the type of toolkit we were envisioning. The goal is
>to build a reusable, durable, flexible prototyping kit that can be whipped
>out for some quick concepting with client and/or design team and have
>something to test with users the next day.

Whitney Quesenbery
Whitney Interactive Design, LLC
w. www.WQusability.com
e. whitneyq at wqusability.com
p. 908-638-5467

UPA - www.usabilityprofessionals.org
STC Usability SIG: www.stcsig.org/usability

25 Nov 2003 - 12:13am
ian swinson
2005

How about felt? It works really well with my
daughter's Madeline toy, it's easy to cut and you can
tape or glue paper onto the movable segments.

And it won't hurt if you drop it on your foot - FWIW
:)

ian

--- Challis Hodge <challis at challishodge.com> wrote:
> Is anyone aware of whiteboard-like material that
> comes in a form
> (sheets, pages) that can be easily cut-up? For
> instance, we are
> creating buttons, widgets, components to be used for
> rapid prototyping
> with users as well as rapid concept concept
> generation with internal
> teams. Thus, a more durable alternative to the clear
> transparency
> sheets used in paper prototyping.
>
>
> There are hook and loop or sticky foam type products
> that can be had from
> craft stores or children's learning/science centers.
> These work well if I
> understand your objective correctly. You can build
> colorcod3ed interface
> components, etc.
>
> -challis
> > _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at interactiondesigners.com
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26 Nov 2003 - 10:23am
Are Halland
2003

> There are many options suggested I was not aware of.

And here's another one: The flannelgraph!

Available from the Norwegian Sunday School netshop:
http://www.nssf.no/butikk/results.lasso?kat2ID=78

Yes, it's kind of heavily tied to the domain of christian pedagogics and
sunday schools. But - hey - the material is general-purpose, durable,
reusable, inexpensive, and well worth a try I should think.

Has anyone else ever considered or tried using a flannelgraph for
prototyping?

Regards,
Are Gjertin Urkegjerde Halland
http://www.brukaropplevingar.com
(blog in norwegian only, sorry!)

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