comments to the "Doro's ridiculously simple phones in the wild"

25 Nov 2007 - 9:17pm
6 years ago
2 replies
470 reads
Jarod Tang
2007

The original link<http://www.engadgetmobile.com/2007/11/22/doros-ridiculously-simple-handleeasy-phones-in-the-wild/>
.

And the interesting thing comes from the reader's comments to this news (
why humble mine comments below).

- "Those "A B C D" buttons are confusing me."
- one of the possible reason is that the design is not follow
the convention (mental model of mobile phones); and this is why
it's simple
but still confusing
- "The completely numeric one is insanely stupid. These are geared
toward old folks. If modern phones are too complicated for the elderly, how
are they going to be able to memorize which number calls who? I'm in my 20s
and I wouldn't even remember them."
- there's no absolutely simple, first of all , it should be
usable for HUMAN
- "MAN! The price for these phones are ridiculous..."

Cheers
-- Jarod

--
IxD for better life style.

http://jarodtang.blogspot.com

Comments

26 Nov 2007 - 9:21am
ELISABETH HUBERT
2007

Is it just me or is the market for these types of phones starting to
disappear. I know that older people are looking to use these types of
phones now, but I'm assuming that the number of elderly that don't
know how to use other features (address book for example) is
decreasing over time. Any idea how long we'll need these types of
solutions around?? I'm thinking no more than say 3 - 5 years, but
that is a shot in the dark. The need for bigger buttons may always be
around.

~Lis

http://www.elisabethhuber.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22900

26 Nov 2007 - 11:57am
Katie Albers
2005

I'm far from elderly but there are two fundamental issues here that
you appear to be conflating:

1) It's just the "elderly" who want these phones
2) They want them because they "don't know how to use other features"
3) Big buttons is a desirable design only for "older people"

First, these phones (which we're going to define here as cell phones
which have only a telephone set of features and which have large
buttons) are useful to a number of different user groups. There are
small children -- who you want to have a phone for safety, but you
don't want them to be able to call a small village in China just for
fun. There are people who find it difficult to use the insanely small
buttons on most cell phones: people with long nails, people with
neural diseases or tremors, people with fat fingers...

Second, sticking with your belief that these phones are for the
elderly: You aren't getting younger, you know. The day will come when
you will find it hard to press the correct, tiny button and to read
the miniscule labels.

Thirdly, most of the actual "elderly" I know love phones with address
books and so forth. They're quite adroit with them. It makes it
easier for them to call the right person without the mental review of
phone numbers necessitated otherwise.

However, in general, the number of people who really, really want
their phone to contain the kitchen sink is probably much smaller than
cell companies would iike. I, for example, do not want my phone to
have video capabilities, I don't want to use it as a camera or for
video creation or display. I don't want a web browser. Not because I
don't want to figure out how to do those things but because the damn
screen is so small I can't imagine why I'd bother.

Actually, the phone hardware companies keep trying to design these
phones and the end-users keep asking for these phones (that is to
say: larger buttons, fewer bells and whistles) but the cell provider
companies love being able to sell the add-ons that go with the fancy
ones.

Katie

P.S. Are you sure that's your URL? I keep getting a Could Not Locate error

At 6:21 AM -0800 11/26/07, ELISABETH HUBERT wrote:
>Is it just me or is the market for these types of phones starting to
>disappear. I know that older people are looking to use these types of
>phones now, but I'm assuming that the number of elderly that don't
>know how to use other features (address book for example) is
>decreasing over time. Any idea how long we'll need these types of
>solutions around?? I'm thinking no more than say 3 - 5 years, but
>that is a shot in the dark. The need for bigger buttons may always be
>around.
>
>~Lis
>
>http://www.elisabethhuber.com
>
>
>. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>Posted from the new ixda.org
>http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22900
>
>
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--

----------------
Katie Albers
katie at firstthought.com

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