Hourly rates?

2 Nov 2007 - 11:22am
6 years ago
14 replies
5449 reads
maya gorton
2006

Hi there,

How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help you
extrapolate from a yearly salary?

I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3 months, working
remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would for a short-term project
but more than I would for a full-time gig.

What do you think?

Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York for a Senior
IA and/or Creative Director?

I'd be happy to hear anyone's experiences with this.

Thanks for your help!
--
m a y a

Comments

2 Nov 2007 - 11:51am
Spina, Andrew
2006

A quick way to figure the hourly rate is to shift the decimal 3 places
in your yearly and cut it in half. 100k is roughly $50/hr.

For senior level work I'd expect from $75 to $200/hr.

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
maya gorton
Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 12:22 PM
To:
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Hourly rates?

Hi there,

How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help you
extrapolate from a yearly salary?

I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3 months,
working remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would for a
short-term project but more than I would for a full-time gig.

What do you think?

Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York for a
Senior IA and/or Creative Director?

I'd be happy to hear anyone's experiences with this.

Thanks for your help!
--
m a y a
________________________________________________________________
*Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
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2 Nov 2007 - 12:09pm
Dan Harrelson
2007

The advice given to me by a consultant focused on small (under 30
employees) professional services businesses is that your hourly rate
always have three digits. This means that a firm should never ever
charge less than $100 per hour. Since a freelancer has less overhead
than a company, the rate would drop accordingly.

If you are doing side work that's in addition to your "real job" then
you need to take into account what that time is worth to you. I
personally haven't tackled any side projects in over a year, but when
I did, I charged a high rate because I knew that I'd be dedicating
nights and weekends to the project. I value this time a lot and
didn't want to short change myself, especially since it was "extra
money".

If you are a full-time freelancer, then you would charge differently
in order to keep your primary income stream coming in.

...Dan

On Nov 2, 2007, at 9:51 AM, Spina, Andrew wrote:

> A quick way to figure the hourly rate is to shift the decimal 3 places
> in your yearly and cut it in half. 100k is roughly $50/hr.
>
> For senior level work I'd expect from $75 to $200/hr.
>

2 Nov 2007 - 2:27pm
Barbara Ballard
2005

The formula I've used since 1994 or so is:

annual salary / 100 = daily rate

(divide by 8 to get hourly)

I've gone through two other more sophisticated techniques that
involved a lot more data. I've also looked at market-based pricing.
The answers were all within 5% of the answer from above.

On 11/2/07, maya gorton <mayagorton at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi there,
>
> How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help you
> extrapolate from a yearly salary?
>

--
Barbara Ballard
barbara at littlespringsdesign.com 1-785-838-3003

2 Nov 2007 - 2:42pm
Raminder Oberoi
2007

This is a very valuable information. Thanks for the question and answers.

On Nov 2, 2007 12:22 PM, maya gorton <mayagorton at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi there,
>
> How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help you
> extrapolate from a yearly salary?
>
> I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3 months, working
> remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would for a short-term project
> but more than I would for a full-time gig.
>
> What do you think?
>
> Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York for a Senior
> IA and/or Creative Director?
>
> I'd be happy to hear anyone's experiences with this.
>
> Thanks for your help!
> --
> m a y a
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>

--
Raminder Oberoi
sinioberoi at gmail.com

2 Nov 2007 - 4:16pm
bminihan
2007

I quoted my annual salary divided by 2000 for the number of full time hours
in a salary year (not my year, some fictitious guy who works 40 hrs a week),
then add 10-20% for health insurance, since that's how much more (minimum)
it costs for health working on your own vs for a company.

As Dan mentioned, if it's after hours I charge more since I work quickly and
that time is more valuable. If it were my full-time gig for awhile I would
vary the rate depending on the anticipated add'l work or recommendations I
might get from it.

Then again, I built my mom's web site for free, so the calculation is to get
a ballpark, not something you have to stick to.

Bryan

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of maya
gorton
Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 12:22 PM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Hourly rates?

Hi there,

How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help you
extrapolate from a yearly salary?

I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3 months, working
remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would for a short-term project
but more than I would for a full-time gig.

What do you think?

Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York for a Senior
IA and/or Creative Director?

I'd be happy to hear anyone's experiences with this.

Thanks for your help!
--
m a y a
________________________________________________________________
*Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help

2 Nov 2007 - 4:52pm
Wendy Fischer
2004

This is reasonable, but you also need to account for social security taxes, medicare, health insurance, liability insurance (if you need it) if you are freelancing and working off of a 1099 and legitimately paying taxes on income that you earn.

I think 30%-50% markup on top of an hourly rate based on your past salary is reasonable in order to cover expenses, particularly if you are providing your own computer and software.

Wendy

----- Original Message ----
From: Bryan Minihan <bjminihan at nc.rr.com>
To: maya gorton <mayagorton at gmail.com>; discuss at ixda.org
Sent: Friday, November 2, 2007 2:16:18 PM
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Hourly rates?

I quoted my annual salary divided by 2000 for the number of full time
hours
in a salary year (not my year, some fictitious guy who works 40 hrs a
week),
then add 10-20% for health insurance, since that's how much more
(minimum)
it costs for health working on your own vs for a company.

As Dan mentioned, if it's after hours I charge more since I work
quickly and
that time is more valuable. If it were my full-time gig for awhile I
would
vary the rate depending on the anticipated add'l work or
recommendations I
might get from it.

Then again, I built my mom's web site for free, so the calculation is
to get
a ballpark, not something you have to stick to.

Bryan

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
maya
gorton
Sent: Friday, November 02, 2007 12:22 PM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Hourly rates?

Hi there,

How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help you
extrapolate from a yearly salary?

I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3 months,
working
remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would for a short-term
project
but more than I would for a full-time gig.

What do you think?

Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York for a
Senior
IA and/or Creative Director?

I'd be happy to hear anyone's experiences with this.

Thanks for your help!
--
m a y a
________________________________________________________________
*Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help

________________________________________________________________
*Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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3 Nov 2007 - 5:55am
Kel Smith
2007

Agree with Bryan's formula and erpdesigner's markup tactic. I
upscale my rate by 30% to cover tax obligations. If it's a long term
project (more than 2-3 months), I'll request monthly invoicing so I
can cover the estimated quarterlies.

I would only add that assets purchased specifically for the project
(such as stock imagery, etc) should be itemized and billed along with
the effort hours. Some folks build these items into the overall cost;
I prefer to list them separately. The exception would be
software/hardware products, unless there is an expectation that the
client will own these items upon delivery.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22107

3 Nov 2007 - 8:32am
Mark Schraad
2006

maya: How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can
help you extrapolate from a yearly salary?

Yes, but remember if you are a contractor - you should add in (30%,
but your milage will most certainly vary) for taxes and benefits. If
you maintain an office (if you don't at least think about what the
overhead costs would be) calculate cost of doing business. This
includes rent, supplies and the cost of your computer equipment. You,
as a contractor, are baring the financial responsability for a lot of
stuff. Salary is for skill levels is often a third to two thirds of
billable rate (usually on a sliding scale). Most design firms and
agencies work with salary + fixed cost, and fro freelancers rate x
mark up percentage.

maya: I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3
months, working remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would
for a short-term project but more than I would for a full-time gig.

I have had half time positions and they never, never end up being
half time unless you have regular office hour, and even then...

maya: Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York
for a Senior IA and/or Creative Director?

If you have a trusted client or two, ask what they would expect to
pay for your skill level and the types of projects you are working
on. Try checking in with folks at an AIGA meeting where this sort of
contracting is very common. In short, charge as much as you can while
still getting some work. Your worth and perceived skill level is very
often based upon your hourly rate. I find that freelancers are often
embarassed or afraid to throw out what they see as a large number.
Stand in front of a mirror and practice saying the number
(seriously!). Don't be so reasonable. You want to be charging a rate
high enough so that you loose some projects on price.

Mark

On Nov 2, 2007, at 12:22 PM, maya gorton wrote:

> Hi there,
>
> How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help
> you
> extrapolate from a yearly salary?
>
> I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3
> months, working
> remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would for a short-term
> project
> but more than I would for a full-time gig.
>
> What do you think?
>
> Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York for
> a Senior
> IA and/or Creative Director?
>
> I'd be happy to hear anyone's experiences with this.
>
> Thanks for your help!
> --
> m a y a

3 Nov 2007 - 3:06pm
susandoran
2010

Hi,

Not sure how useful an essentially "me too" response might be, but here goes
;-)

I've been doing contract work on and off for 15 years, and have found it's
prudent to gauge rate at 50% over a FT hourly rate. Federal taxes alone are
likely to be at *least* 30% (and sometimes more, based on the fact you must
make quarterly estimated payments), not to mention state & local taxes.
Other costs to you include health ins and other "benefits." Other benefits
may include things like % of salary of a typical 401K FT employer
contribution---it may seem indulgent to factor this in, but as you pile on
the years you'll be glad you did so--as well as however many weeks of
vacation a FT job you'd take would cover.

I also do consider length of project. For short-term, and/or last-minute
projects I'll charge more. Also complexity of project and skillsets drawn
on. If there's project management involved, leading project, regular
interfacing with clients/representing the company, the rate would be more
than if most of the gig involved were toiling away in obscurity on more
focused finite tasks. ;-)

If the project were a solid and consistent 20 hours, over 6 months, my rate
might be appreciably lower than if it were 6 weeks. But a PT 20-hour job for
3 month...that's on a borderline for me. My rate would be lower if there
were a good possibility that my relationship with the client, or the
project, would extend beyond 3 months.

And as it being a PT 20-hour job, I tend to disagree with the notion that it
necessarily expand beyond those hours. One of the beauties of contract
work--for the company and contractor--is that you're on the clock, and every
minute is counted. It is to the benefit of both parties to have fairly
strict parameters around hours. That said, I found it's more challenging to
set boundaries around hours when working in the capacity of *consultant* vs.
"contractor" (the differences between the two being fodder for another
discussion).

- Susan

On 11/3/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> maya: How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can
> help you extrapolate from a yearly salary?
>
> Yes, but remember if you are a contractor - you should add in (30%,
> but your milage will most certainly vary) for taxes and benefits. If
> you maintain an office (if you don't at least think about what the
> overhead costs would be) calculate cost of doing business. This
> includes rent, supplies and the cost of your computer equipment. You,
> as a contractor, are baring the financial responsability for a lot of
> stuff. Salary is for skill levels is often a third to two thirds of
> billable rate (usually on a sliding scale). Most design firms and
> agencies work with salary + fixed cost, and fro freelancers rate x
> mark up percentage.
>
> maya: I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3
> months, working remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would
> for a short-term project but more than I would for a full-time gig.
>
> I have had half time positions and they never, never end up being
> half time unless you have regular office hour, and even then...
>
> maya: Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York
> for a Senior IA and/or Creative Director?
>
> If you have a trusted client or two, ask what they would expect to
> pay for your skill level and the types of projects you are working
> on. Try checking in with folks at an AIGA meeting where this sort of
> contracting is very common. In short, charge as much as you can while
> still getting some work. Your worth and perceived skill level is very
> often based upon your hourly rate. I find that freelancers are often
> embarassed or afraid to throw out what they see as a large number.
> Stand in front of a mirror and practice saying the number
> (seriously!). Don't be so reasonable. You want to be charging a rate
> high enough so that you loose some projects on price.
>
> Mark
>
>
> On Nov 2, 2007, at 12:22 PM, maya gorton wrote:
>
> > Hi there,
> >
> > How do you calculate hourly rates? Is there a formula that can help
> > you
> > extrapolate from a yearly salary?
> >
> > I have a freelance job that's 20 hours a week for the next 3
> > months, working
> > remotely--I feel I should charge less than I would for a short-term
> > project
> > but more than I would for a full-time gig.
> >
> > What do you think?
> >
> > Can anyone give me a clue about industry standards in New York for
> > a Senior
> > IA and/or Creative Director?
> >
> > I'd be happy to hear anyone's experiences with this.
> >
> > Thanks for your help!
> > --
> > m a y a
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>

3 Nov 2007 - 5:11pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> I've been doing contract work on and off for 15 years, and have found it's
> prudent to gauge rate at 50% over a FT hourly rate.

If I'm following this correctly, I think this means you've been
undercharging for the past 15 years.

Let's say you make $70k at a full-time position (this number was picked
arbitrarily). Your hourly rate is, like, $33 and change (ish). Following
your equation, your hourly rate for contract work would be $50/hour (ish).
If you make more at your in-house position, then you're used to a higher
rate, and your contract rate is still way too low.

This is not only a low rate for an experienced designer, but it also means
that your nights and weekends are barely valuable to you.

This is your *personal* time you're giving up. It's gotta be far more
valuable than that. If it's not, well, then maybe the last thing you need is
more work.

-r-

3 Nov 2007 - 5:27pm
susandoran
2010

Robert,

Ha! you're completely right--not that I undercharge, but my math was wrong!

What I meant was, as a simple rule of thumb, to double (2x) the hourly rate
you'd get as a FT person.

So an arbitrarily picked $100K salary "inside"--which is approx
$50/hr--would be doubled to $100/hr.

Yikes--thanks for calling me on that!

- Susan

On 11/3/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>
> I've been doing contract work on and off for 15 years, and have found it's
> > prudent to gauge rate at 50% over a FT hourly rate.
>
>
>
> If I'm following this correctly, I think this means you've been
> undercharging for the past 15 years.
>
>
> Let's say you make $70k at a full-time position (this number was picked
> arbitrarily). Your hourly rate is, like, $33 and change (ish). Following
> your equation, your hourly rate for contract work would be $50/hour (ish).
> If you make more at your in-house position, then you're used to a higher
> rate, and your contract rate is still way too low.
>
> This is not only a low rate for an experienced designer, but it also means
> that your nights and weekends are barely valuable to you.
>
> This is your *personal* time you're giving up. It's gotta be far more
> valuable than that. If it's not, well, then maybe the last thing you need is
> more work.
>
> -r-
>

3 Nov 2007 - 9:15pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

Oh good! I'm really glad it was just a math error! I was a little
concerned you were undervaluing your work. :)

-r-

Sent from my iPhone.

On Nov 3, 2007, at 3:27 PM, "Susan Doran" <susandoran at gmail.com> wrote:

> Robert,
>
> Ha! you're completely right--not that I undercharge, but my math was
> wrong!
>
>
> What I meant was, as a simple rule of thumb, to double (2x) the
> hourly rate
> you'd get as a FT person.
>
> So an arbitrarily picked $100K salary "inside"--which is approx
> $50/hr--would be doubled to $100/hr.
>
> Yikes--thanks for calling me on that!
>
> - Susan
>
> On 11/3/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>>
>> I've been doing contract work on and off for 15 years, and have
>> found it's
>>> prudent to gauge rate at 50% over a FT hourly rate.
>>
>>
>>
>> If I'm following this correctly, I think this means you've been
>> undercharging for the past 15 years.
>>
>>
>> Let's say you make $70k at a full-time position (this number was
>> picked
>> arbitrarily). Your hourly rate is, like, $33 and change (ish).
>> Following
>> your equation, your hourly rate for contract work would be $50/hour
>> (ish).
>> If you make more at your in-house position, then you're used to a
>> higher
>> rate, and your contract rate is still way too low.
>>
>> This is not only a low rate for an experienced designer, but it
>> also means
>> that your nights and weekends are barely valuable to you.
>>
>> This is your *personal* time you're giving up. It's gotta be far more
>> valuable than that. If it's not, well, then maybe the last thing
>> you need is
>> more work.
>>
>> -r-
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help

4 Nov 2007 - 6:51am
Pradyot Rai
2004

Another pointer which I thought wasn't discussed, regarding W2 vs.
1099 terms -- You should charge atlease 12% extra for 1099 compared to
W2 term to take care of expenses/benefits.

Prady

On 11/3/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
> Oh good! I'm really glad it was just a math error! I was a little
> concerned you were undervaluing your work. :)
>
> -r-
>
> Sent from my iPhone.
>
> On Nov 3, 2007, at 3:27 PM, "Susan Doran" <susandoran at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Robert,
> >
> > Ha! you're completely right--not that I undercharge, but my math was
> > wrong!
> >
> >
> > What I meant was, as a simple rule of thumb, to double (2x) the
> > hourly rate
> > you'd get as a FT person.
> >
> > So an arbitrarily picked $100K salary "inside"--which is approx
> > $50/hr--would be doubled to $100/hr.
> >
> > Yikes--thanks for calling me on that!
> >
> > - Susan
> >
> > On 11/3/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
> >>
> >> I've been doing contract work on and off for 15 years, and have
> >> found it's
> >>> prudent to gauge rate at 50% over a FT hourly rate.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> If I'm following this correctly, I think this means you've been
> >> undercharging for the past 15 years.
> >>
> >>
> >> Let's say you make $70k at a full-time position (this number was
> >> picked
> >> arbitrarily). Your hourly rate is, like, $33 and change (ish).
> >> Following
> >> your equation, your hourly rate for contract work would be $50/hour
> >> (ish).
> >> If you make more at your in-house position, then you're used to a
> >> higher
> >> rate, and your contract rate is still way too low.
> >>
> >> This is not only a low rate for an experienced designer, but it
> >> also means
> >> that your nights and weekends are barely valuable to you.
> >>
> >> This is your *personal* time you're giving up. It's gotta be far more
> >> valuable than that. If it's not, well, then maybe the last thing
> >> you need is
> >> more work.
> >>
> >> -r-
> >>
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> > February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> > Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>

5 Nov 2007 - 11:57am
maya gorton
2006

Thanks everybody for your good advice. It was much appreciated.

cheers,
maya

On 11/4/07, prady <pradyotrai at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Another pointer which I thought wasn't discussed, regarding W2 vs.
> 1099 terms -- You should charge atlease 12% extra for 1099 compared to
> W2 term to take care of expenses/benefits.
>
> Prady
>
> On 11/3/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
> > Oh good! I'm really glad it was just a math error! I was a little
> > concerned you were undervaluing your work. :)
> >
> > -r-
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone.
> >
> > On Nov 3, 2007, at 3:27 PM, "Susan Doran" <susandoran at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Robert,
> > >
> > > Ha! you're completely right--not that I undercharge, but my math was
> > > wrong!
> > >
> > >
> > > What I meant was, as a simple rule of thumb, to double (2x) the
> > > hourly rate
> > > you'd get as a FT person.
> > >
> > > So an arbitrarily picked $100K salary "inside"--which is approx
> > > $50/hr--would be doubled to $100/hr.
> > >
> > > Yikes--thanks for calling me on that!
> > >
> > > - Susan
> > >
> > > On 11/3/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
> > >>
> > >> I've been doing contract work on and off for 15 years, and have
> > >> found it's
> > >>> prudent to gauge rate at 50% over a FT hourly rate.
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> If I'm following this correctly, I think this means you've been
> > >> undercharging for the past 15 years.
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> Let's say you make $70k at a full-time position (this number was
> > >> picked
> > >> arbitrarily). Your hourly rate is, like, $33 and change (ish).
> > >> Following
> > >> your equation, your hourly rate for contract work would be $50/hour
> > >> (ish).
> > >> If you make more at your in-house position, then you're used to a
> > >> higher
> > >> rate, and your contract rate is still way too low.
> > >>
> > >> This is not only a low rate for an experienced designer, but it
> > >> also means
> > >> that your nights and weekends are barely valuable to you.
> > >>
> > >> This is your *personal* time you're giving up. It's gotta be far more
> > >> valuable than that. If it's not, well, then maybe the last thing
> > >> you need is
> > >> more work.
> > >>
> > >> -r-
> > >>
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> > > February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> > > Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
> > >
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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> > ________________________________________________________________
> > *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> > February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> > Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
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> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>

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