What tools do you use for prototyping?

1 Nov 2007 - 1:58pm
3 years ago
92 replies
7708 reads
Todd Warfel
2003

What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

Comments

1 Nov 2007 - 2:21pm
Beck Tench
2007

I generally go from whiteboard --> camera --> 11x17 graph paper -->
client --> photoshop --> code/developer. Depending on the project
and developer, I may skip the photoshop step.

Beck

On 11/1/07, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com> wrote:
> What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> President, Design Researcher
> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
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>

--
becktench.com

1 Nov 2007 - 3:15pm
Chad Hutchinson
2007

Photoshop, HTML, CSS, ASP, XML, Access... Hopefully moving to Blend
soon.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

1 Nov 2007 - 3:37pm
Dante Murphy
2006

Most recently used FLASH; have also used HTML, clickable PDF, and paper.

FLASH along with annotated wireframes was really successful.

Dante Murphy | Director of Information Architecture | D I G I T A S H E
A L T H
229 South 18th Street, 2nd Floor | Rittenhouse Square | Philadelphia, PA
19103
Email: dmurphy at digitashealth.com | www.digitashealth.com

1 Nov 2007 - 3:50pm
Breinier
2007

Whiteboard, paper, colored pencils, Dreamweaver, Axure, photoshop,
Flash...

What about yourself Todd?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

1 Nov 2007 - 4:00pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?
>

I use OmniGraffle > PDF for simple prototypes, and occasionally Flash. Then
I often screencast the interactions with narration using Snapz Pro X. I call
it a "protocast".

Clients love it, and it gets the point across extremely well.

-r-

1 Nov 2007 - 4:09pm
Ari
2006

i use mostly Axure now. i also occasionally use Visio. i've tried other
solutions such as GUI Design Studio and LucidSpec - both use a 'simulator'
mode and lack the degree of interactivity or fidelity i often need.
if i'm prototyping a desktop app (windows only), i find that Multimedia
Fusion can be useful.

On 11/1/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>
> >
> > What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?
> >
>
> I use OmniGraffle > PDF for simple prototypes, and occasionally Flash.
> Then
> I often screencast the interactions with narration using Snapz Pro X. I
> call
> it a "protocast".
>
> Clients love it, and it gets the point across extremely well.
>
> -r-
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

1 Nov 2007 - 4:14pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Paper/Pencil
Photoshop
Director
HTML (Dreamweaver, CSSEdit)

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

In our society,
the scarce factor is not information,
it is time to attend to information.

- Herb Simon

1 Nov 2007 - 3:58pm
Ethan Estes
2007

Use sketchbook/fireworks a ton and then into flash/flex. They have a
new Flex extension for FW that has made my life easier. Also use the
various Flex explorers out there to get rough code built.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

1 Nov 2007 - 5:06pm
Raminder Oberoi
2007

Visio and Flash - love using flash for its components.

•Sini

On Nov 1, 2007, at 2:58 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com>
wrote:

> What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> President, Design Researcher
> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help

1 Nov 2007 - 5:36pm
Karthik Vijayakumar
2007

I have been using Axure and recently discovered two other tools - Intuitect and Jumpchart. They sound like they make the prototyping process easier but haven't got my hands on them yet.

Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com> wrote:
What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

________________________________________________________________
*Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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1 Nov 2007 - 6:15pm
.pauric
2006

Robert: "I use OmniGraffle PDF for simple prototypes, and
occasionally Flash. Then I often screencast the interactions with
narration using Snapz Pro X. I call it a "protocast"."

Thats interesting. Do make a distinction between iterative
designing, and deliverables? I would describe your Protocast as a
Mockup. My thinking is that its important to understand the audience
for anything I'm working on. Be that an audience of myself as I'm
sketching on paper, or a larger group.

Robert, is your output all 'prototype' or do you switch over from
throw-away designs to deliverable work at some point?

thanks - pauric

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

1 Nov 2007 - 6:26pm
Chauncey Wilson
2007

Here are a few that I use:

Adobe Acrobat
Microsoft Word
SmartDraw
Inspiration
InDesign
MockupScreens
GUI Design Studio
Visio
PowerPoint
Excel
Magnets with UI objects and a magnetic whiteboard

Chauncey

On 11/1/07, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com> wrote:
> What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> President, Design Researcher
> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>

1 Nov 2007 - 6:35pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

Due to a few key typos, I'm not entirely sure what you're asking, but I'll
give it a shot ...

> Do make a distinction between iterative
> designing, and deliverables?

I do protocasts iteratively, just like wireframes and prototypes. I just use
these "protocasts" to further illustrate how something is meant to work. I
don't create prototypes for entire apps all that often - usually, I just
protoype individual interactions and send that along with the protocast.

I would describe your Protocast as a
> Mockup.

Um ... ok. I don't understand your point.

My thinking is that its important to understand the audience
> for anything I'm working on. Be that an audience of myself as I'm
> sketching on paper, or a larger group.

I'm not sure what this has to do with the subject at hand.

Robert, is your output all 'prototype' or do you switch over from
> throw-away designs to deliverable work at some point?

Not really sure what you're after here, but I'll attempt to answer.

I use wireframes and storyboards extremely often, prototypes less often, and
protocasts on occasion. Depending on the project, either the work ends here,
or we stick around and do usability reviews and such as a site is developed
by a client's in-house team, or we build it out to completion and deliver
the final site to the client.

I don't consider wireframes to be "throw-away designs". I archive these and
continue using them with every new project/iteration for the same app/site.

-r-

1 Nov 2007 - 6:37pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> Magnets with UI objects and a magnetic whiteboard
>

Pray tell, where did you find such a cool gadget?

-r-

1 Nov 2007 - 6:55pm
Chauncey Wilson
2007

You can purchase the magnet paper at Staples and other large office
supply stores and then print out GUI objects using an ink jet (don't
use a laser printer - you might destroy it). The office supply places
also small whiteboards that are magnetic so you can use the magnetic
GUI pieces and also draw around them. I got the idea from a study
done by Tom Tullis at Fidelity in Boston. We are using this method to
get feedback on new menu and toolbar designs.

Chauncey

On 11/1/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>
> > Magnets with UI objects and a magnetic whiteboard
> >
>
> Pray tell, where did you find such a cool gadget?
>
> -r-

1 Nov 2007 - 6:58pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

Sweet - I'm gonna have to try that out. Thanks for the tip!

-r-

Sent from my iPhone.

On Nov 1, 2007, at 4:55 PM, "Chauncey Wilson"
<chauncey.wilson at gmail.com> wrote:

> You can purchase the magnet paper at Staples and other large office
> supply stores and then print out GUI objects using an ink jet (don't
> use a laser printer - you might destroy it). The office supply places
> also small whiteboards that are magnetic so you can use the magnetic
> GUI pieces and also draw around them. I got the idea from a study
> done by Tom Tullis at Fidelity in Boston. We are using this method to
> get feedback on new menu and toolbar designs.
>
> Chauncey
>
> On 11/1/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Magnets with UI objects and a magnetic whiteboard
>>>
>>
>> Pray tell, where did you find such a cool gadget?
>>
>> -r-

1 Nov 2007 - 7:02pm
SemanticWill
2007

Chauncey - that is great. Now I want to run out to staples.

will evans
user experience architect
wkevans4 at gmail.com
617.281.1281

On Nov 1, 2007, at 7:55 PM, "Chauncey Wilson"
<chauncey.wilson at gmail.com> wrote:

> You can purchase the magnet paper at Staples and other large office
> supply stores and then print out GUI objects using an ink jet (don't
> use a laser printer - you might destroy it). The office supply places
> also small whiteboards that are magnetic so you can use the magnetic
> GUI pieces and also draw around them. I got the idea from a study
> done by Tom Tullis at Fidelity in Boston. We are using this method to
> get feedback on new menu and toolbar designs.
>
> Chauncey
>
> On 11/1/07, Robert Hoekman, Jr. <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Magnets with UI objects and a magnetic whiteboard
>>>
>>
>> Pray tell, where did you find such a cool gadget?
>>
>> -r-
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help

1 Nov 2007 - 7:16pm
.pauric
2006

apologies for the typos, long day.

I'm not entirely sure what I'm asking either, I was interested in your
process more than anything. Maybe I should turn it around and explain
where I'm coming from.

It helps me to make a distinction between creating a design and then
communicating that design. For me, prototyping is the sketching and
testing of possible layouts & flows. Once one or more designs become
candidates for a particular problem I then render them in to something
that is then used to explain them to a wider audience. But, at this
point, the kernel of the interaction is captured, defined. I then
move on to explaining that definition. Thus the end of the
prototyping stage. That not to say I dont take input on a given
design... but essentially.. its not really 'prototyping' anymore is
it? Just ironing out the wrinkles as well as selling the design to
stakeholders.

Maybe 'throw-away' was a bad choice of words on my part. I was
thinking in project specific terms. But it does underline the
distinction for me. The paperwork, wireframes and library elements
all fall under prototyping for me. They are in a 'language' that only
I need to interpret. Anything thats handed over, presented.. anything
that could possibly be called a Specification, well its a mockup.

Understanding the audience for a particular doc aids me in determining
the level & type of detail needed for that doc.

Put it another way. If a design, in omni.pdf for example, isnt really
going to change a whole lot from draft... bar some fixes & input from
the stakeholders. Is is -really- a prototype anymore? Or just a
specification in need of a few tweaks.

Let me also say, as if the typos dont give it away, I'm a little
dyslexic.. so maybe my wrangling with documentation requires me to go
through this 'understand your audience' thing.

This smells awfully like a semantics debate, so I'll be quite now (o;

thanks for your time - pauric

2 Nov 2007 - 9:53am
Michael Micheletti
2006

Paper prototypes, photoshop mockups, flash, html, more or less in that
order. Almost everything I work on ends up with a paper prototype at some
point. Photoshop is often to build confidence in my clients that those
blurry shapes on the wireframe will really look like something they want, as
well as to help me really see the design. Flash is just so handy to mimic
the behavior of a mobile app or tricky component. For web sites and
applications, I'll often build a simple html prototype; this often becomes a
staging point for CSS and graphic design work.

Michael Micheletti

On 11/1/07, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com> wrote:
>
> What prototyping tools are in your toolbox?
>

2 Nov 2007 - 4:53pm
Darren Ellis
2007

Whiteboard, paper, Visio (wires, flows, and quick HTML prototypes), occasionally Illustrator, sometimes Flash, often Photoshop, always Dreamweaver (working prototypes).

I'm really liking the idea of the magnetic paper on whiteboards.

3 Nov 2007 - 5:31am
Kel Smith
2007

Depends on the request. Always start whiteboard to blackberry camera,
then to graph paper with tissue overlays. Visio forever. Quick
HTML/CSS, with some simple AJAX to demonstrate progressive
disclosure. Flash if necessary, particularly if a higher-fidelity is
required for rich media interfaces. ImageReady, Photoshop,
Illustrator as needed.

I handcode all my HTML/CSS/JS to standards with Homesite. Oh how I
would love a magnetic whiteboard, with stacks of different Visio-type
shapes on erasable magnets.

Side note: one thing I've noticed over the years is clients becoming
more comfortable with the idea of wireframing for reviewing
functionality. It's a good trend.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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3 Nov 2007 - 4:05pm
Jim Kauffman
2004

> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On
> Behalf Of Chauncey Wilson
> Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2007 7:27 PM
> To: Todd Zaki Warfel
> Cc: Interaction Designers Designers; iai-members at lists.iainstitute.org
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] What tools do you use for prototyping?
>
> Here are a few that I use:
>
<snip>
> PowerPoint

I'm glad to see PowerPoint mentioned. I use a variety of tools, but lately
I've been having great success with PP, I think for a couple of reasons.
One, my audiences (including a very wide variety of internal and external
clients) are familiar with PowerPoint, and can see that I'm showing them a
prototype done in PP rather than working code. Two, most of my audiences
aren't aware of the interactive capabilities of modern versions of PP and so
can suspend disbelief long enough to really get a feel for how the
application will work.

I do wireframes and screen grabs, then import them into PP and create the
interactivity. Of course, this only works for a scripted demonstration--if I
were going to let people get their hands on it, I'd use HTML and CSS with a
bit of Flash.

Jim K.

3 Nov 2007 - 9:28pm
Matt Nish-Lapidus
2007

I also use HTML/CSS/Javascript to prototype, and a lot of the time I
use HTML/CSS for wireframes too. I just find it easier to manipulate
than Visio/Omnigraffle/etc ... maybe it's because I do interface
development as well as design....

As for wireframing functionality, I totally agree. It's a great idea
and HTML/CSS/Javascript is a great way to do it.

On Sat, 3 Nov 2007 03:31:30, ksmith <ksmith at lerningkerv.com> wrote:
> Depends on the request. Always start whiteboard to blackberry camera,
> then to graph paper with tissue overlays. Visio forever. Quick
> HTML/CSS, with some simple AJAX to demonstrate progressive
> disclosure. Flash if necessary, particularly if a higher-fidelity is
> required for rich media interfaces. ImageReady, Photoshop,
> Illustrator as needed.
>
> I handcode all my HTML/CSS/JS to standards with Homesite. Oh how I
> would love a magnetic whiteboard, with stacks of different Visio-type
> shapes on erasable magnets.
>
> Side note: one thing I've noticed over the years is clients becoming
> more comfortable with the idea of wireframing for reviewing
> functionality. It's a good trend.

--
Matt Nish-Lapidus
email/gtalk: mattnl at gmail.com
++
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mattnl
Home: http://www.nishlapidus.com

4 Nov 2007 - 7:21pm
vutpakdi
2003

Sketchbook Pro
Canvas (output as clickable PDFs)
Eclipse or JBuilder on the rare occasions that I'm doing a high fidelity
prototype.

Ron

4 Nov 2007 - 9:39pm
KS Wang
2007

Paper!

Good for drafting out, materialising and visualising the ideas I have
in mind, before moving on the the standards like Visio, Omni Graffe

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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5 Nov 2007 - 9:56am
Scott McDaniel
2007

On 11/3/07, Jim Kauffman <jkauff at verizon.net> wrote:
> One, my audiences (including a very wide variety of internal and external
> clients) are familiar with PowerPoint, and can see that I'm showing them a
> prototype done in PP rather than working code. Two, most of my audiences
> aren't aware of the interactive capabilities of modern versions of PP and so
> can suspend disbelief long enough to really get a feel for how the
> application will work.

This is an unfortunate point which I thought I'd highlight. I once
had a client who asked me why the first code push we sent out didn't
look like the Visio wireframes I'd shown him.

So yeah...while I can produce things very quickly in HTMLetc, the
more-obvious-than-obvious separation can be extremely helpful in
surprising ways.

Scott
--
"Don't just survive while waiting for someone's revolution to clear your head -
act as if you were already free - but take the risk, dance before you
calcify." - Hakim Bey

6 Nov 2007 - 12:16am
Rony Philip
2007

Has anyone tried Axure RP as prototyping tool?.

Couple of things that can help is developing a prototype:
1. Calculate in terms of budget and timeline. If the time and budget is
less, why would anyone want to create and deliver a high fidelity prototype
by spending a lot of time in visualizing the designs and coding?. A simple
and neat paper or a PP file is good enough.
2. Depends on the stage or lifecycle the project is. I.e. During the initial
data gathering process, one can use paper protototypes to think aloud the
initial ideas. As the site structure gets finalized one can get into the
page level architecture design by using PP, Visio, etc. After the page level
architecture is iterated and signed off, the final graphic design can be
created using Photoshop to create the definite page templates. The final
prototype can be generated using HTML just before going off to the
programers, so that they will have the fundamental design guidelines.

Cheers
Rony

On 11/6/07, Mike Scarpiello <mscarpiello at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Hmm, this is all very strange. So someone wrote and entire book on it, we
> did it many times in grad school, buts it's not a prototyping tool?
>
> *Paper Prototyping: The Fast and Easy Way to Design and Refine User
> Interfaces (Interactive Technologies) *
> by Carolyn Snyder<
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/104-4239408-2128720?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Carolyn%20Snyder
> >
>
>
> http://www.amazon.com/Paper-Prototyping-Interfaces-Interactive-Technologies/dp/1558608702/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-4239408-2128720?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1194318540&sr=8-1
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>

6 Nov 2007 - 7:05am
Ari
2006

Yes, I use it a lot. It can generate elaborate prototypes but you need
to invest a bit of time to do so, thus, I tend to use it for small
tools or modules vs. large projects since time is something in short
supply.

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 6, 2007, at 12:16 AM, "Rony Philip" <philiprony at gmail.com> wrote:

> Has anyone tried Axure RP as prototyping tool?.
>

> Couple of things that can help is developing a prototype:
> 1. Calculate in terms of budget and timeline. If the time and budget
> is
> less, why would anyone want to create and deliver a high fidelity
> prototype
> by spending a lot of time in visualizing the designs and coding?. A
> simple
> and neat paper or a PP file is good enough.
> 2. Depends on the stage or lifecycle the project is. I.e. During the
> initial
> data gathering process, one can use paper protototypes to think
> aloud the
> initial ideas. As the site structure gets finalized one can get into
> the
> page level architecture design by using PP, Visio, etc. After the
> page level
> architecture is iterated and signed off, the final graphic design
> can be
> created using Photoshop to create the definite page templates. The
> final
> prototype can be generated using HTML just before going off to the
> programers, so that they will have the fundamental design guidelines.
>
> Cheers
> Rony
>
>
> On 11/6/07, Mike Scarpiello <mscarpiello at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Hmm, this is all very strange. So someone wrote and entire book on
>> it, we
>> did it many times in grad school, buts it's not a prototyping tool?
>>
>> *Paper Prototyping: The Fast and Easy Way to Design and Refine User
>> Interfaces (Interactive Technologies) *
>> by Carolyn Snyder<
>> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/104-4239408-2128720?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Carolyn%20Snyder
>>>
>>
>>
>> http://www.amazon.com/Paper-Prototyping-Interfaces-Interactive-Technologies/dp/1558608702/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-4239408-2128720?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1194318540&sr=8-1
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
>> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
>> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help

6 Nov 2007 - 2:20pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Hi everyone,

I shifted the "Paper is not a prototyping tool" discussion to its
own thread to avoid derailing Todd's thread.
http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=22174

To get back on track, Todd is asking "what prototyping tools are in
your toolbox?"

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

6 Nov 2007 - 3:01pm
.pauric
2006

I used a 10" bandsaw, Orbital & belt sander and sometimes a drill
press, e.g. http://tinyurl.com/2w86gp
for some things http://tinyurl.com/2ula9h

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

6 Nov 2007 - 3:03pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Love it! - very nice Pauric.

On Tuesday, November 06, 2007, at 03:01PM, "pauric" <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>I used a 10" bandsaw, Orbital & belt sander and sometimes a drill
>press, e.g. http://tinyurl.com/2w86gp
>for some things http://tinyurl.com/2ula9h
>
>
>. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
>Posted from the new ixda.org
>http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050
>
>
>________________________________________________________________
>*Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
>February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
>Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
>________________________________________________________________
>Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>Unsubscribe ................ http://gamma.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>List Guidelines ............ http://gamma.ixda.org/guidelines
>List Help .................. http://gamma.ixda.org/help
>
>

6 Nov 2007 - 8:15pm
Todd Warfel
2003

On Nov 5, 2007, at 3:52 PM, Andrei Herasimchuk wrote:

> The fact that Visio seems to be a "legitimate" tool in the field
> just makes me want to cry. I mean, would you create a scale model if
> you were building the original iPod out of PlayDough to show to the
> guy who signs the checks what the design will be? Or Legos for that
> matter?

I don't personally consider Visio a legitimate tool for design or
prototyping, except that since it has such deep penetration in the
field it cannot, IMHO, be ignored. I for one am looking forward to the
day when it falls by the wayside.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

6 Nov 2007 - 8:23pm
Todd Warfel
2003

On Nov 6, 2007, at 2:09 PM, Matthew Nish-Lapidus wrote:

> That being said, paper is a valuable design tool and can be used to
> great advantage. But if what you need is a true interaction
> prototype then you need an interactive medium.

That's an interesting concept. Using an interactive medium to
prototype or simulate interactivity. I've taught a number of paper
prototyping workshops, teaching another next year at the IxDA
conference, and can assure you that you can create interactive paper
prototypes. In fact, we have a great audio player that is interactive,
albeit w/some assistance from a moderator. But the scrubber moves
along when someone pushes the play button and we can even rewind and
fast forward.

Ask anyone who's taken the workshop, or come and find out for
yourself. Paper prototypes can be interactive, if you know what you're
doing and know how.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

6 Nov 2007 - 7:52pm
Eugene Kim
2005

Hi, I build out prototypes using Homesite/Photoshop with varying
degrees of complexity depending on the usability tasks. If something
is required for which I don't possess the skills (or time) then it's
farmed out to one of our web dev guys.

Here's an example of a prototype for a call center tool using simple
image maps:

http://stang99.w1.com/eprov_temp/usability/eprov_search.html

(Note: Many links are inactive. Click on Taylor Smith when you're
on the search results page to get to the main page.)

I need to check out tools like Axure RP Pro.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

6 Nov 2007 - 8:45pm
Katie Albers
2005

At 8:15 PM -0500 11/6/07, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>On Nov 5, 2007, at 3:52 PM, Andrei Herasimchuk wrote:
>
>> The fact that Visio seems to be a "legitimate" tool in the field
>> just makes me want to cry. I mean, would you create a scale model if
>> you were building the original iPod out of PlayDough to show to the
>> guy who signs the checks what the design will be? Or Legos for that
>> matter?
>
>I don't personally consider Visio a legitimate tool for design or
>prototyping, except that since it has such deep penetration in the
>field it cannot, IMHO, be ignored. I for one am looking forward to the
>day when it falls by the wayside.
>

I think Visio is an excellent tool for creating boxes in different
shapes...but the sooner it disappears the happier I'll be. Everyone
seems to want people who are expert in its use...and in every case
I've seen the design or prototyping it's being used for would be
better served by any number of other tools.

Katie
--

----------------
Katie Albers
katie at firstthought.com

6 Nov 2007 - 8:42pm
Miguel Peres
2007

In the company I work for we prototype most of the interfaces in Flash.
However, we are trying to switch from Flash to a combination of Evas and
Edje. Besides being open source, these tools allows us to develop prototypes
that can be easily modified and used in the final product because the code
generated for the interface layout and basic interactions (button, slides
and etc) are already compatible with our final product development tools.

Btw: I'm also new to the list and I want say it has been a very productive
and enjoyable lecture. And before I forget, you can find more information
about Evas and Edje on http://enlightenment.org.au/Libraries/Edje/ .

Miguel Peres
Nokia Institute of Technology

6 Nov 2007 - 9:17pm
Raminder Oberoi
2007

Just for my information, what is that most people dislike Visio so much?

• Raminder Oberoi
www.retheory.com

On Nov 6, 2007, at 8:45 PM, Katie Albers <katie at firstthought.com> wrote:

> At 8:15 PM -0500 11/6/07, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>> On Nov 5, 2007, at 3:52 PM, Andrei Herasimchuk wrote:
>>
>>> The fact that Visio seems to be a "legitimate" tool in the field
>>> just makes me want to cry. I mean, would you create a scale model if
>>> you were building the original iPod out of PlayDough to show to the
>>> guy who signs the checks what the design will be? Or Legos for that
>>> matter?
>>
>> I don't personally consider Visio a legitimate tool for design or
>> prototyping, except that since it has such deep penetration in the
>> field it cannot, IMHO, be ignored. I for one am looking forward to
>> the
>> day when it falls by the wayside.
>>
>
> I think Visio is an excellent tool for creating boxes in different
> shapes...but the sooner it disappears the happier I'll be. Everyone
> seems to want people who are expert in its use...and in every case
> I've seen the design or prototyping it's being used for would be
> better served by any number of other tools.
>
> Katie
> --
>
> ----------------
> Katie Albers
> katie at firstthought.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 Nov 2007 - 9:45pm
Nicholas Iozzo
2007

Most people miss what Visio can do. Do not think of Visio as a drawing
tool. Think of it as a drawing language. You can do a lot of great
stuff with automation. You do not have to use the shapes it gives
you. You can make your own.

All of that being said. Visio out of the box is a generic tool. Us
using it with the the basic shapes is like a developer writing code
using VI editor (or emacs if we want to start the debate).

_____________

On an unrelated note... how do we edit the email account on the ixda
website? I am unable to reply to any of the messages. I subscribed
using my personal account but need to reply using my work account
(firewall issues).

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

6 Nov 2007 - 10:18pm
Anonymous

Quote from DUX2007 today.

"Always paper first. Always. Paper before Pixel."

Mark Baskinger
Faculty, Quality of Life Technology,
Carnegie Mellon Robotics, University of Pittsburgh
Presentation: Experientializing Home Appliances to Empower the Aging
Population for Autonomous Living

6 Nov 2007 - 10:38pm
Christopher Fahey
2005

> I AM prototyping the touchscreen buttons along with 'click'
> behavior to get
> some user feedback. The actual touchscreen arrives today...fun
> fun. :)

Hi Billy, welcome!

We recently developed a touch screen kiosk here at Behavior, and it
was great fun. One of the interesting things we learned is that since
the iPhone came out, people are starting to expect far more rich
interactions from touch screens than they used to.

Read for more:
http://tinyurl.com/2n93em
http://www.graphpaper.com/2007/10-31_georges-seurat-dot-com

Cheers,
-Cf

Christopher Fahey
____________________________
Behavior
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com
me: http://www.graphpaper.com

7 Nov 2007 - 2:18pm
Marcus Pierce
2007

With clients, I use words. Then, whatever happens to be around. The
complexity/slickness of the medium used to design (or present)
dilutes the integrity (and thus, in our field, usability) of the end
product. If your ideas are valid and based on experience and science,
then napkins, slides, origami, charades, whatever, will do. Save the
elaborate presentation for the developers who need to be told in
detail exactly what to build.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

7 Nov 2007 - 6:57pm
Andrei Herasimchuk
2004

I'm going to try and answer a bunch of questions in one message
versus spamming multiple answers.

On Nov 6, 2007, at 6:16 PM, Eric Scheid wrote:
> Just for my information, what is that most people dislike Visio so
> much?

Too many people in our field use Visio as a replacement for
production level drawing tools, like FreeHand, Fireworks r
Illustrator. In doing so, they stop themselves from learning the
skills they need to actually do more design at the production level,
which in turn are skills that help in dealing with richer prototypes.

On Nov 6, 2007, at 4:25 PM, Mark Schraad wrote:
> Well unless you think I am either a moron or a hypocrite, then it
> would stand to reason that I believe this to be point of view, not
> of fact. So effectively what you have stated here is something
> along the lines of, "no I'm not, you are". I guess I expect more
> from someone as experienced and seasoned as you.

I don't think you are either. I was attempting to state that your
position about my phrasing of "paper is not prototyping" leaves me
with either basically saying nothing about the topic or having to
water down my stance to the degree it doesn't contribute anything to
the discussion. Obviously, I phrased that opinion as equally useful
as what I was commenting on.

On Nov 6, 2007, at 6:17 PM, Raminder Oberoi wrote:

> Most people miss what Visio can do. Do not think of Visio as a drawing
> tool. Think of it as a drawing language. You can do a lot of great
> stuff with automation. You do not have to use the shapes it gives
> you. You can make your own.

If people used Visio in that manner, it wouldn't bother nearly as
much. But people do use it a "drawing tool" and that drives me nuts.

Another reason I hate Visio is that it has quickly become the
PowerPoint of the digital design field. It's methods and approach to
drawing has corned a lot of people into thinking inappropriately
about what constitutes good software design. The same sort of
argument Tufte makes about PowerPoint, in relation to how it changes
the way people think about how to create and give a presentation.
Visio is doing the same thing to our field.

On Nov 7, 2007, at 12:14 PM, Christopher Fahey wrote:
> One of the "prototyping" methods used for the original Palm Pilot
> was balsa wood, the equivalent of PlayDough or lego bricks.

Having built many a scale model using materials like Balsa wood, I
would have to disagree. Balsa wood is on an order much higher than
PlayDough or Legos.

On Nov 7, 2007, at 12:14 PM, Christopher Fahey wrote:
> The purpose was to test one critical aspect of the product: The
> aspect they were prototyping was "how does it feel in the hand" and
> "how does it fit into a person's various pockets and bags". They
> built lots of different blocks and tried them all before settling
> on the deck-of-cards size we all know today as the de-facto PDA
> standard form factor. The universal consensus today is that Palm
> completely nailed that form factor question, and I don't doubt that
> the balsa prototyping made that success happen.

Agreed. However, using wood of any kind and shaping it and getting it
to be correct to be a scale model of a real product is an order of
fidelity significantly higher than PlayDough.

On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
> uh .. waitaminit .. since when would a *drawing* of a Volkswagen
> Beetle be
> thought of as representative of the category of things we call "paper
> prototypes"?

They both tend to represent "sketches" of the design of the product.
And in my view, sketching is a great design tool and design process,
but it's not the same as prototyping.

On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
> If that "real live concept car fully built" was built out of
> modelers foam,
> wood, and other not-real-car materials, could you not still sit
> inside it
> and provide all sorts of feedback (sans actually driving across
> europe, that
> is)? It would even be sufficient to present the instrument panel in
> the form
> of a colour printout instead of real live electronics - sightlines
> could be
> tested, comprehension could be tested etc.

Agreed.

On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
> The medium of paper is great for prototyping things which appear on
> a flat
> surface (eg. websites), just as foam core and wood and such do a
> pretty good
> job of prototyping human-interface interaction possibilities of 3D
> objects.

This is where we disagree, unless you mean that the "paper" prototype
is also a pixel perfect representation of the product in various
stages of the workflow but just printed on paper. But my experience
has been that people treat paper prototypes as lesser than that, as
nothing more than crude sketch diagrams. (Which I also use but as a
design tool, not a prototyping tool.)

Further, if you've done the work of getting pixel precise mockups to
use for your paper prototypes, you are not very far off from any
number of means to make that work interactive for the purposes of
getting feedback in context. In this case, on the computer screen
itself.

On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:14 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> How would you define a prototype? Would you see prototyping as a
> design tool, or something else? How does iterative design relate to
> prototyping?

I define a prototype in the software world as anything up to the
point it becomes engineering. This means as much actual design work
that will reflect the real product up to the point it has to be
engineered at a functional level, like hooking it up to a live
database or something.

Sorry that sounds so coy, but my experience has been that the
technology changes so fast, there's no other to define without
changing my definition every three years.

--
Andrei Herasimchuk

Principal, Involution Studios
innovating the digital world

e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
c. +1 408 306 6422

7 Nov 2007 - 7:25pm
Ari
2006

On 11/7/07, Andrei Herasimchuk <andrei at involutionstudios.com> wrote:
>
> I'm going to try and answer a bunch of questions in one message
> versus spamming multiple answers.
>
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 6:16 PM, Eric Scheid wrote:
> > Just for my information, what is that most people dislike Visio so
> > much?
>
> Too many people in our field use Visio as a replacement for
> production level drawing tools, like FreeHand, Fireworks r
> Illustrator. In doing so, they stop themselves from learning the
> skills they need to actually do more design at the production level,
> which in turn are skills that help in dealing with richer prototypes.

I would agree with this but let's be clear that Visio is not a prototyping
tool on its face. Yes, it can be made to be one via add-ons such as those
provided by Intuitect but by itself, it is just very fancy, object-based
diagramming software.

It's real value to anyone in the IxD field is in being able to produce rich
2D diagrams, flowcharts and conceptual mockups.

This is definitely very useful, particularly, if you are responsible for
generating various types of specifications, technical documentation or even
doing basic UI explorations.

However, for strict prototyping where interactivity needs to be explained
and well as experienced - Visio is generally not the tool to use.

It simply evolved as a de-facto tool for IA specialists because it was one
of the few robust packages available on the Windows side of the house. For
many years, site maps and other IA tasks were done on Macs, which had
several such tools available (remember Inspiration?).

> --
> Andrei Herasimchuk
>
> Principal, Involution Studios
> innovating the digital world
>
> e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
> c. +1 408 306 6422
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

7 Nov 2007 - 7:34pm
Raminder Oberoi
2007

Ok... Regarding Visio... I can and have always been able to create
wireframes, flows, interaction states, pretty much any relationship
diagrams. If I didn't have access to a computer/software I would have
to do all that on paper. Nothing wrong with paper, but a tool like
visio is far more efficient when it comes to reusing, editing and
being able to represent concepts nearly. For a guy like me who likes
to use pen and paper but only for personal ideation (cause only I can
understand my hand drawings) visio is a blessing!

Now regarding Visio 'prototyping' I have in many projects been able to
create clickthrus that have got clients buy in quickly and
effectively, without investing more than a few hours of time and money
(why? Because I already had the wireframe which only needed to be
stringed together)

For paper vs. Visio/any tool, in practical everyday use, almost all
the time we use printouts, don't we? Regardless of what tool we use
chances are that we do print it on paper. It seems like the sequence
is - mind >> paper/pixel >> paper >> mind >> pixel ..... Repeat
process. Finally we are free to use any medium/tool for creating the
prototype as determined by project goals.

• Raminder Oberoi
www.retheory.com

On Nov 7, 2007, at 6:57 PM, Andrei Herasimchuk <andrei at involutionstudios.com
> wrote:

> I'm going to try and answer a bunch of questions in one message
> versus spamming multiple answers.
>
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 6:16 PM, Eric Scheid wrote:
>> Just for my information, what is that most people dislike Visio so
>> much?
>
> Too many people in our field use Visio as a replacement for
> production level drawing tools, like FreeHand, Fireworks r
> Illustrator. In doing so, they stop themselves from learning the
> skills they need to actually do more design at the production level,
> which in turn are skills that help in dealing with richer prototypes.
>
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 4:25 PM, Mark Schraad wrote:
>> Well unless you think I am either a moron or a hypocrite, then it
>> would stand to reason that I believe this to be point of view, not
>> of fact. So effectively what you have stated here is something
>> along the lines of, "no I'm not, you are". I guess I expect more
>> from someone as experienced and seasoned as you.
>
> I don't think you are either. I was attempting to state that your
> position about my phrasing of "paper is not prototyping" leaves me
> with either basically saying nothing about the topic or having to
> water down my stance to the degree it doesn't contribute anything to
> the discussion. Obviously, I phrased that opinion as equally useful
> as what I was commenting on.
>
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 6:17 PM, Raminder Oberoi wrote:
>
>> Most people miss what Visio can do. Do not think of Visio as a
>> drawing
>> tool. Think of it as a drawing language. You can do a lot of great
>> stuff with automation. You do not have to use the shapes it gives
>> you. You can make your own.
>
> If people used Visio in that manner, it wouldn't bother nearly as
> much. But people do use it a "drawing tool" and that drives me nuts.
>
> Another reason I hate Visio is that it has quickly become the
> PowerPoint of the digital design field. It's methods and approach to
> drawing has corned a lot of people into thinking inappropriately
> about what constitutes good software design. The same sort of
> argument Tufte makes about PowerPoint, in relation to how it changes
> the way people think about how to create and give a presentation.
> Visio is doing the same thing to our field.
>
>
> On Nov 7, 2007, at 12:14 PM, Christopher Fahey wrote:
>> One of the "prototyping" methods used for the original Palm Pilot
>> was balsa wood, the equivalent of PlayDough or lego bricks.
>
> Having built many a scale model using materials like Balsa wood, I
> would have to disagree. Balsa wood is on an order much higher than
> PlayDough or Legos.
>
>
> On Nov 7, 2007, at 12:14 PM, Christopher Fahey wrote:
>> The purpose was to test one critical aspect of the product: The
>> aspect they were prototyping was "how does it feel in the hand" and
>> "how does it fit into a person's various pockets and bags". They
>> built lots of different blocks and tried them all before settling
>> on the deck-of-cards size we all know today as the de-facto PDA
>> standard form factor. The universal consensus today is that Palm
>> completely nailed that form factor question, and I don't doubt that
>> the balsa prototyping made that success happen.
>
> Agreed. However, using wood of any kind and shaping it and getting it
> to be correct to be a scale model of a real product is an order of
> fidelity significantly higher than PlayDough.
>
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
>> uh .. waitaminit .. since when would a *drawing* of a Volkswagen
>> Beetle be
>> thought of as representative of the category of things we call "paper
>> prototypes"?
>
> They both tend to represent "sketches" of the design of the product.
> And in my view, sketching is a great design tool and design process,
> but it's not the same as prototyping.
>
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
>> If that "real live concept car fully built" was built out of
>> modelers foam,
>> wood, and other not-real-car materials, could you not still sit
>> inside it
>> and provide all sorts of feedback (sans actually driving across
>> europe, that
>> is)? It would even be sufficient to present the instrument panel in
>> the form
>> of a colour printout instead of real live electronics - sightlines
>> could be
>> tested, comprehension could be tested etc.
>
> Agreed.
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
>> The medium of paper is great for prototyping things which appear on
>> a flat
>> surface (eg. websites), just as foam core and wood and such do a
>> pretty good
>> job of prototyping human-interface interaction possibilities of 3D
>> objects.
>
> This is where we disagree, unless you mean that the "paper" prototype
> is also a pixel perfect representation of the product in various
> stages of the workflow but just printed on paper. But my experience
> has been that people treat paper prototypes as lesser than that, as
> nothing more than crude sketch diagrams. (Which I also use but as a
> design tool, not a prototyping tool.)
>
> Further, if you've done the work of getting pixel precise mockups to
> use for your paper prototypes, you are not very far off from any
> number of means to make that work interactive for the purposes of
> getting feedback in context. In this case, on the computer screen
> itself.
>
>
> On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:14 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>
>> How would you define a prototype? Would you see prototyping as a
>> design tool, or something else? How does iterative design relate to
>> prototyping?
>
> I define a prototype in the software world as anything up to the
> point it becomes engineering. This means as much actual design work
> that will reflect the real product up to the point it has to be
> engineered at a functional level, like hooking it up to a live
> database or something.
>
> Sorry that sounds so coy, but my experience has been that the
> technology changes so fast, there's no other to define without
> changing my definition every three years.
>
> --
> Andrei Herasimchuk
>
> Principal, Involution Studios
> innovating the digital world
>
> e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
> c. +1 408 306 6422
>
>
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7 Nov 2007 - 7:39pm
Ari
2006

i never said you couldn't use Visio to do what you described. i've used it
that way too. i've also used it to develop enter specifications. however, i
eventually ran into limitations as Visio wasn't designed specifically for
what i needed it to do.
i still use it but not nearly as much as i used and for very specific tasks
for which it is well suited to do.

On 11/7/07, Raminder Oberoi <sinioberoi at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Ok... Regarding Visio... I can and have always been able to create
> wireframes, flows, interaction states, pretty much any relationship
> diagrams. If I didn't have access to a computer/software I would have
> to do all that on paper. Nothing wrong with paper, but a tool like
> visio is far more efficient when it comes to reusing, editing and
> being able to represent concepts nearly. For a guy like me who likes
> to use pen and paper but only for personal ideation (cause only I can
> understand my hand drawings) visio is a blessing!
>
> Now regarding Visio 'prototyping' I have in many projects been able to
> create clickthrus that have got clients buy in quickly and
> effectively, without investing more than a few hours of time and money
> (why? Because I already had the wireframe which only needed to be
> stringed together)
>
> For paper vs. Visio/any tool, in practical everyday use, almost all
> the time we use printouts, don't we? Regardless of what tool we use
> chances are that we do print it on paper. It seems like the sequence
> is - mind >> paper/pixel >> paper >> mind >> pixel ..... Repeat
> process. Finally we are free to use any medium/tool for creating the
> prototype as determined by project goals.
>
>
> • Raminder Oberoi
> www.retheory.com
>
> On Nov 7, 2007, at 6:57 PM, Andrei Herasimchuk <
> andrei at involutionstudios.com
> > wrote:
>
> > I'm going to try and answer a bunch of questions in one message
> > versus spamming multiple answers.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 6, 2007, at 6:16 PM, Eric Scheid wrote:
> >> Just for my information, what is that most people dislike Visio so
> >> much?
> >
> > Too many people in our field use Visio as a replacement for
> > production level drawing tools, like FreeHand, Fireworks r
> > Illustrator. In doing so, they stop themselves from learning the
> > skills they need to actually do more design at the production level,
> > which in turn are skills that help in dealing with richer prototypes.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 6, 2007, at 4:25 PM, Mark Schraad wrote:
> >> Well unless you think I am either a moron or a hypocrite, then it
> >> would stand to reason that I believe this to be point of view, not
> >> of fact. So effectively what you have stated here is something
> >> along the lines of, "no I'm not, you are". I guess I expect more
> >> from someone as experienced and seasoned as you.
> >
> > I don't think you are either. I was attempting to state that your
> > position about my phrasing of "paper is not prototyping" leaves me
> > with either basically saying nothing about the topic or having to
> > water down my stance to the degree it doesn't contribute anything to
> > the discussion. Obviously, I phrased that opinion as equally useful
> > as what I was commenting on.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 6, 2007, at 6:17 PM, Raminder Oberoi wrote:
> >
> >> Most people miss what Visio can do. Do not think of Visio as a
> >> drawing
> >> tool. Think of it as a drawing language. You can do a lot of great
> >> stuff with automation. You do not have to use the shapes it gives
> >> you. You can make your own.
> >
> > If people used Visio in that manner, it wouldn't bother nearly as
> > much. But people do use it a "drawing tool" and that drives me nuts.
> >
> > Another reason I hate Visio is that it has quickly become the
> > PowerPoint of the digital design field. It's methods and approach to
> > drawing has corned a lot of people into thinking inappropriately
> > about what constitutes good software design. The same sort of
> > argument Tufte makes about PowerPoint, in relation to how it changes
> > the way people think about how to create and give a presentation.
> > Visio is doing the same thing to our field.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 7, 2007, at 12:14 PM, Christopher Fahey wrote:
> >> One of the "prototyping" methods used for the original Palm Pilot
> >> was balsa wood, the equivalent of PlayDough or lego bricks.
> >
> > Having built many a scale model using materials like Balsa wood, I
> > would have to disagree. Balsa wood is on an order much higher than
> > PlayDough or Legos.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 7, 2007, at 12:14 PM, Christopher Fahey wrote:
> >> The purpose was to test one critical aspect of the product: The
> >> aspect they were prototyping was "how does it feel in the hand" and
> >> "how does it fit into a person's various pockets and bags". They
> >> built lots of different blocks and tried them all before settling
> >> on the deck-of-cards size we all know today as the de-facto PDA
> >> standard form factor. The universal consensus today is that Palm
> >> completely nailed that form factor question, and I don't doubt that
> >> the balsa prototyping made that success happen.
> >
> > Agreed. However, using wood of any kind and shaping it and getting it
> > to be correct to be a scale model of a real product is an order of
> > fidelity significantly higher than PlayDough.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
> >> uh .. waitaminit .. since when would a *drawing* of a Volkswagen
> >> Beetle be
> >> thought of as representative of the category of things we call "paper
> >> prototypes"?
> >
> > They both tend to represent "sketches" of the design of the product.
> > And in my view, sketching is a great design tool and design process,
> > but it's not the same as prototyping.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
> >> If that "real live concept car fully built" was built out of
> >> modelers foam,
> >> wood, and other not-real-car materials, could you not still sit
> >> inside it
> >> and provide all sorts of feedback (sans actually driving across
> >> europe, that
> >> is)? It would even be sufficient to present the instrument panel in
> >> the form
> >> of a colour printout instead of real live electronics - sightlines
> >> could be
> >> tested, comprehension could be tested etc.
> >
> > Agreed.
> >
> > On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:42 PM, Miguel Peres wrote:
> >> The medium of paper is great for prototyping things which appear on
> >> a flat
> >> surface (eg. websites), just as foam core and wood and such do a
> >> pretty good
> >> job of prototyping human-interface interaction possibilities of 3D
> >> objects.
> >
> > This is where we disagree, unless you mean that the "paper" prototype
> > is also a pixel perfect representation of the product in various
> > stages of the workflow but just printed on paper. But my experience
> > has been that people treat paper prototypes as lesser than that, as
> > nothing more than crude sketch diagrams. (Which I also use but as a
> > design tool, not a prototyping tool.)
> >
> > Further, if you've done the work of getting pixel precise mockups to
> > use for your paper prototypes, you are not very far off from any
> > number of means to make that work interactive for the purposes of
> > getting feedback in context. In this case, on the computer screen
> > itself.
> >
> >
> > On Nov 6, 2007, at 5:14 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
> >
> >> How would you define a prototype? Would you see prototyping as a
> >> design tool, or something else? How does iterative design relate to
> >> prototyping?
> >
> > I define a prototype in the software world as anything up to the
> > point it becomes engineering. This means as much actual design work
> > that will reflect the real product up to the point it has to be
> > engineered at a functional level, like hooking it up to a live
> > database or something.
> >
> > Sorry that sounds so coy, but my experience has been that the
> > technology changes so fast, there's no other to define without
> > changing my definition every three years.
> >
> > --
> > Andrei Herasimchuk
> >
> > Principal, Involution Studios
> > innovating the digital world
> >
> > e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
> > c. +1 408 306 6422
> >
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> > February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> > Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> ________________________________________________________________
> *Come to IxDA Interaction08 | Savannah*
> February 8-10, 2008 in Savannah, GA, USA
> Register today: http://interaction08.ixda.org/
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

7 Nov 2007 - 9:49pm
Bill Fernandez
2007

At 11:49 AM +0100 11/6/07, <p.coopmans at d-construct.be> wrote:

But... I'd love to have a tool that combines Omnigraffle, Fireworks
and Axure... and that works on a Mac as well as on a pc. ;-)

Peter:

For many years I've used a program that to some extent meets the
above goals: Canvas.

o It runs on Mac and Windows.

o It lets you easily mix and match vector and raster objects.

o It has a goodly assortment of graphic design effects and control
(It's like a mini drafting program combined with a mini Photoshop).

o It also has good word processing and page layout capabilities.

o It easily lets you create documents as long as you like (I
routinely create 70-page UI specs with it).

o It exports multi-page documents to PDF (so that the rest of the
world can read them).

o It lets you create hot-spots on your pages, link them together, and
export the lot as a combination of HTML and images: so you can create
a graphically rich, statically linked sets of web pages for use a
wireframes or prototypes.

It's got some annoying bugs, and it doesn't do all the things that
the programs you mention do, but I always find myself going back to
it because it combines in one program so many feature sets that I
want to apply to the same document.

YMMV,
--Bill

--

======================================================================
Bill Fernandez * User Interface Architect * Bill Fernandez Design

(505) 346-3080 * bf_list1 AT billfernandez DOT com *
http://billfernandez.com
======================================================================

8 Nov 2007 - 8:25am
Joe Sokohl
2004

paper/whiteboard then OmniGraffle then Fireworks then...whatever the
team's using. That's often Visio for wireframes and Photoshop for
design followed by some sort of higher fidelity. I use TextWrangler,
BBEdit, and Homesite (windows) for HTML/CSS coding.

I concur with Bill--give me a good combined tool. While I like
Canvas, having used it since version 3.5, I am saddened by what
ACDeeSee has done to it. Latest version is Windows only, for example.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

8 Nov 2007 - 9:30am
Gavin Edmonds
2007

Following this thread it is clear that 'prototypes' and what is a
'design specification' is being confused as well as the purpose for
creating a prototype. Prototypes can be used from developing an idea,
gaining user insights, presentations to the client & form part of the
final design specification to be built (Sometimes the prototype becomes
the final product).

In everyday design life there are factors of different applications of
UI, design methods, budgets, time & requirements that drive a decision
for the best approach. The UI folk that I know all have one thing in
common - they strive to do their best making the most out of the
opportunity.

To get back to the topic of what tools do you use for prototyping - the
range I use goes from sketch - high fidelity on paper, in browser &
flash. The decision for what type of prototype is driven by the purpose
& resource. It is difficult to choose the best prototyping method
without consider the factors above.

I find comments in the thread about there being no value for paper
prototyping unfounded as I have always gained huge value from paper
prototyping, especially for usability & user research.

Maybe the thread will gain more value from stating what the prototype is
required for?

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8 Nov 2007 - 11:34am
.pauric
2006

Gavin Edmunds - well said!

Also, on the desire for an all-in-one solution that could combine a
number of drafting, graphic & interactivity applications. I would
say that's not necessarily a good thing.

Working on paper allows for complete freeform but once you move in to
an app you're always going to be slightly constrained by the tool's
functionality. Put it another way, every app adds its flavour to
your work.

Its why UI's created in code only look engineering centric. Its not
because coders like engineering centric interfaces, working within
code produces a systemic centric layout.

So, I believe its very important to always have a number of tools
from different vendors in your toolset.

Poor analogy time: a Chef who only uses a microwave will produce food
that tastes like it was cooked in a microwave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=22050

8 Nov 2007 - 11:41am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 7 Nov 2007, at 02:17, Raminder Oberoi wrote:

> Just for my information, what is that most people dislike Visio so
> much?

Personally:
* As a piece of software I don't enjoy using it very much. Not the
best user experience in the world.
* Just like Microsoft Word it's become a "standard" format for
documents of a certain type. Which is a bit of a pain if you want to
use another tool.
* While it's not really Visio's fault I personally don't find the
"Big Pile Of Pretty Wireframes" document a terribly effective
communication tool in getting the design decisions from one set of
heads into another.

Cheers,

Adrian

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