Factors in converting from on-ground to online task accomplishment

23 Oct 2007 - 6:33pm
7 years ago
5 replies
522 reads
arielv
2007

Hi all:

I'm looking for your thoughts and/or references to research or other
well-founded work regarding the factors that eventually convert people from
taking care of tasks on-ground to taking care of them online. I expect that
some of the biggest areas in which this is relevant are shopping and
banking.

I realize this is a big question and there are many "it depends" answers,
but but in general, for a computer-savvy audience of middle-of-life folks,
my sense is that this move happens when some combination of factors is
evident:

- Assurance of security
- Faster to do tasks online
- Hours are better
- Anonymity/privacy
- Anything else?

I am even more interested in this type of conversion when people are looking
for information. When do they convert from calling someone on the phone to
using an online resource (knowledge bank)?

- Anonymity/privacy - don't have to feel stupid by asking their
question
- Get a response/answer immediately (assuming they can find the
information they wanted)
- Discover additional information along the way?
- Anything else?

I know that two very strong factors at work underneath all of these other
ones are age, and comfort with computers in general. I'm not interested in
discussing those ones in this case since my audience is as described above,
but you guys want to talk about those factors (they certainly merit
discussion) please feel free to start an offshoot thread!

All the best,
Ariel van Spronsen
www.arielv.net

Comments

23 Oct 2007 - 8:12pm
ELISABETH HUBERT
2007

I am even more interested in this type of conversion when people are looking
for information. When do they convert from calling someone on the phone to
using an online resource (knowledge bank)?

I know that this may be combined with some of the reasons that you've
already given, but with my experience it is also access to a cpu with
internet. I know that this is common day for everyone on this post and most
people that we deal with from day to day. But if one doesn't have immediate
access like they do with a phone (most everyone has these of course) then
they won't use that medium.

24 Oct 2007 - 3:41am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 24 Oct 2007, at 01:33, Ariel van Spronsen wrote:

> Hi all:
>
> I'm looking for your thoughts and/or references to research or other
> well-founded work regarding the factors that eventually convert
> people from
> taking care of tasks on-ground to taking care of them online. I
> expect that
> some of the biggest areas in which this is relevant are shopping and
> banking.
>
> I realize this is a big question and there are many "it depends"
> answers,
> but but in general, for a computer-savvy audience of middle-of-life
> folks,
> my sense is that this move happens when some combination of factors is
> evident:
>
> - Assurance of security
> - Faster to do tasks online
> - Hours are better
> - Anonymity/privacy
> - Anything else?
[snip]

A thought...

One thing I find interesting is where people migrate to an online
system that performs poorly compared to the offline process.

For example:
* Spending an hour messing around with a online catalogue rather than
spending five minutes talking to a librarian
* Spending days sending comments back and forth on a thread on a
project management system, rather than sitting down for a 15 minute
meeting.
* Using a complex issue tracking system for something that would be
better handled by a bunch of index cards and a cork board.

I find it interesting because it can be _really_ hard to break people
of the habit. The online is perceived as "better" along one
dimension, and that takes precedence even though the overall task is
made much, much harder.

Cheers,

Adrian

25 Oct 2007 - 9:35pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

On 10/23/07, Ariel van Spronsen <arielv at gmail.com> wrote:

> I am even more interested in this type of conversion when people are
> looking
> for information. When do they convert from calling someone on the phone to
> using an online resource (knowledge bank)?
>
> - Anonymity/privacy - don't have to feel stupid by asking their
> question
> - Get a response/answer immediately (assuming they can find the
> information they wanted)
> - Discover additional information along the way?
> - Anything else?

- Social proof of information validity (ratings, reviews, comments,
recommendations etc.).
- Lasting record (archive) of transaction, information exchange.

Oleh

26 Oct 2007 - 1:20pm
arielv
2007

Thanks Caroline, that article proved helpful. And I appreciate the
input from everyone else too. Oleh, the added point of social proof
of information validity is something I'll definitely be considering
in the problem, thanks for bringing it up.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://gamma.ixda.org/discuss?post=21827

5 Nov 2007 - 11:50pm
B Vijay Shankar
2007

Hi Ariel,

2 other important considerations missing in this discussion are
1) distance/proximity of the service
2) Energy/Money conserved by taking online path

Please comment...

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=21827

Syndicate content Get the feed