Neonode N2 and gesture-based UI

29 Sep 2007 - 7:06pm
6 years ago
5 replies
883 reads
Petteri Hiisilä
2004

Check out the user manual of Neonode's new phone. The power of
gestures and interaction design has been put into good use. The phone
has already been sold out, more arriving in a week or two. I pre-
ordered one.

http://www.neonode.com/en-gb/support/n2/users-guide/

Are there any Neonode people reading this list?

Best,
Petteri

--
Petteri Hiisilä
Senior Interaction Designer
iXDesign / +358505050123 /
petteri.hiisila at ixdesign.fi

"Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated."
- Tim Peters

Comments

1 Oct 2007 - 8:15am
.pauric
2006

Petteri, very interesting design. I noted that the speaker/microphone
seem to be on the back of the device... it says in section 4

"while talking on the our Neonode, you hold it with the backside
against your ear, with the screen facing away from you"

Apart from the initial mindwarp learning curve. Do you not feel
there's a security issue in people potentially seeing your contact
details in public?

That aside, I really like the way the screen is sectioned in to
three: start/keyboard/sweep. I'm a fan of noun/verb
(applications/actions) interfaces. Its a scalable design. However,
do you feel maybe that its a little 'engineering centric'?

After all, in the website's marketing blurb they say this: "To make
it convenient and fast to access all features and content of the
device, we also designed our own user interface. It has a similar
structure to a PC, but without deep and complex menus." I love the
design, it suits me but... I'm a geek.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the improved ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=20925

1 Oct 2007 - 8:17am
.pauric
2006

correction: the keyboard is sectioned in to three:
start/keyboard/tools.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the improved ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=20925

1 Oct 2007 - 10:27am
Petteri Hiisilä
2004

> Apart from the initial mindwarp learning curve. Do you not feel
> there's a security issue in people potentially seeing your contact
> details in public?

I didn't think about it that way, but now that you mention: maybe
it's an issue. The phone is so tiny, though, that it would be quite
hard to hold it in your hand such that the hand wouldn't cover the
phone. And if it's something important, I'd likely talk in a private
room/corner anyway.

But you're right, they haven't obeyed the unwritten standard to keep
the speaker on the same side; hopefully they had a darn good reason :)

> That aside, I really like the way the screen is sectioned in to
> three: start/keyboard/sweep. I'm a fan of noun/verb
> (applications/actions) interfaces. Its a scalable design. However,
> do you feel maybe that its a little 'engineering centric'?

Again, I didn't think about it that way. The practice of replacing
buttons with gestures isn't yet very common to say the least.

This is one of those devices that needs to be experienced to form a
truely informed opinion. The Forward and Back sweeps (acting as Yes
and No sweeps) will probably be useful when using the phone without
looking. You'll also feel a little bump when you touch the screen
elements with your finger. Those experiences are hard to simulate/
imagine without trying.

It's worth noting that Neonode N1 already had many of the gestures
that the iPhone made famous, and the N1 was released in 2004! For
example, "This is how you unlock it"-gesture is the "Yes" sweep -
left to right on the bottom of the screen.

> After all, in the website's marketing blurb they say this: "To make
> it convenient and fast to access all features and content of the
> device, we also designed our own user interface. It has a similar
> structure to a PC, but without deep and complex menus." I love the
> design, it suits me but... I'm a geek.

I'm buying this for myself, and I'm an early adopter and a geek. But
let's see what non-geeks have to say about it and how natural they
find its interaction framework and the gestures. If the phone really
has a similar structure to PC, I might well hate it myself! But from
the videos it didn't seem computer'ish.

Video: http://mobilementalism.com/2007/03/26/video-of-neonode-n2-tiny-
touchscreen-phone/
More here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=neonode%20n2

Many of them are using the prototype from last spring.

Petteri

--
Petteri Hiisilä
Palveluarkkitehti /
Senior Interaction Designer /
Plenware Oy / +358505050123 /
petteri.hiisila at plenware.com

"Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated."
- Tim Peters

1 Oct 2007 - 11:32am
keyur sorathia
2007

I have bit different point of view.

1. This phone requires constant attention, as user is always sliding his/her
finger to operate.
2. To close some application user has to move the finger from right to left.
how would user know about this type of interaction to close the application.
3. To view the complete menu user has three steps of interaction , while in
iphone complete menu can be viewed on the screen (may be because of large
screen)
4. Talking on the our Neonode, you hold it with the backside against your
ear (pauric described in previous mail)

Keyur.

On 10/1/07, Petteri Hiisilä <petteri.hiisila at ixdesign.fi> wrote:
>
> > Apart from the initial mindwarp learning curve. Do you not feel
> > there's a security issue in people potentially seeing your contact
> > details in public?
>
> I didn't think about it that way, but now that you mention: maybe
> it's an issue. The phone is so tiny, though, that it would be quite
> hard to hold it in your hand such that the hand wouldn't cover the
> phone. And if it's something important, I'd likely talk in a private
> room/corner anyway.
>
> But you're right, they haven't obeyed the unwritten standard to keep
> the speaker on the same side; hopefully they had a darn good reason :)
>
> > That aside, I really like the way the screen is sectioned in to
> > three: start/keyboard/sweep. I'm a fan of noun/verb
> > (applications/actions) interfaces. Its a scalable design. However,
> > do you feel maybe that its a little 'engineering centric'?
>
> Again, I didn't think about it that way. The practice of replacing
> buttons with gestures isn't yet very common to say the least.
>
> This is one of those devices that needs to be experienced to form a
> truely informed opinion. The Forward and Back sweeps (acting as Yes
> and No sweeps) will probably be useful when using the phone without
> looking. You'll also feel a little bump when you touch the screen
> elements with your finger. Those experiences are hard to simulate/
> imagine without trying.
>
> It's worth noting that Neonode N1 already had many of the gestures
> that the iPhone made famous, and the N1 was released in 2004! For
> example, "This is how you unlock it"-gesture is the "Yes" sweep -
> left to right on the bottom of the screen.
>
> > After all, in the website's marketing blurb they say this: "To make
> > it convenient and fast to access all features and content of the
> > device, we also designed our own user interface. It has a similar
> > structure to a PC, but without deep and complex menus." I love the
> > design, it suits me but... I'm a geek.
>
> I'm buying this for myself, and I'm an early adopter and a geek. But
> let's see what non-geeks have to say about it and how natural they
> find its interaction framework and the gestures. If the phone really
> has a similar structure to PC, I might well hate it myself! But from
> the videos it didn't seem computer'ish.
>
> Video: http://mobilementalism.com/2007/03/26/video-of-neonode-n2-tiny-
> touchscreen-phone/
> More here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=neonode%20n2
>
> Many of them are using the prototype from last spring.
>
> Petteri
>
> --
> Petteri Hiisilä
> Palveluarkkitehti /
> Senior Interaction Designer /
> Plenware Oy / +358505050123 /
> petteri.hiisila at plenware.com
>
> "Simple is better than complex.
> Complex is better than complicated."
> - Tim Peters
>
>
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1 Oct 2007 - 12:56pm
Petteri Hiisilä
2004

keyur sorathia kirjoitti 1.10.2007 kello 19:32:

> I have bit different point of view.

I somewhat agree with your points, but in my opinion they will turn
out to be much less important in real life than they seem at first.

I'm not arguing that the N2 is for everybody, quite the opposite. It
is an expensive device that isn't 3G, WiFi or a smartphone. But it's
an interesting little case to study, because it's so different, in a
good way, and I hope that it won't fail as a business.

> 1. This phone requires constant attention, as user is always
> sliding his/her finger to operate.

... sure, but other phones - even the iPhone - need constant
attention too, imho. In N2 the atomic operations are performed with
sweeps at the edges of the screen. These idioms are new to almost
everybody, but they are very natural and easy to learn. You'll feel
the edges of the screen, so there's not as much need for visual
attention as in (m)any other touchscreen(s).

For example, you won't have to look at the phone to take or end a
call (unless you want to). You also won't have to orientate your
finger to the Close button, wherever that might be in a particular
app, because you'll simply do the No sweep from your muscle memory.

> 2. To close some application user has to move the finger from right
> to left. how would user know about this type of interaction to
> close the application.

They wouldn't know, of course, but I'd argue that it doesn't matter.
The perpetual intermediate knows it. A personal phone shouldn't be
optimized like some information kiosk at the train station in Helsinki.

The Yes and No gestures are trivial to learn and almost impossible to
forget for most people. Same goes for Change view gesture, Tap
gesture, Scroll gesture(s) and Close gesture. The interaction
vocabulary is small and it makes sense.

> 3. To view the complete menu user has three steps of interaction ,
> while in iphone complete menu can be viewed on the screen (may be
> because of large screen)

This is true. It's a 60 gram (0.13 pound) device and doesn't have a
lot of screen estate, so there is some navigation if you want to see
every item.

Entering text messages and browsing the phonebook didn't look optimal
either, since there was no coasting and some on-screen items seemed
quite small. The device is really really tiny: smaller than a credit
card. It's a bit thick, though.

Hopefully they'll improve these.

Petteri

--
Petteri Hiisilä
Palveluarkkitehti /
Senior Interaction Designer /
Plenware Oy / +358505050123 /
petteri.hiisila at plenware.com

"Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated."
- Tim Peters

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