The Third Place: We're designing it now.

22 Sep 2007 - 2:35pm
6 years ago
4 replies
1217 reads
Cwodtke
2004

http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/BuildingCommunitieswithSo.html

Reading Joel on Software's Building Communities with Software
"The social scientist Ray Oldenburg talks about how humans need a
third place, besides work and home, to meet with friends, have a beer,
discuss the events of the day, and enjoy some human interaction. Coffee
shops, bars, hair salons, beer gardens, pool halls, clubs, and other
hangouts are as vital as factories, schools and apartments"

It brings up the question "Are Social Networks, Media and Software the
new third place?"

Where does one go to assuage loneliness or boredom? Do you open Twitter?
Swing by Facebook? Is email a third place? Is IM?

--
Christina Wodtke
Principal Instigator
415-577-2550

Business :: http://www.cucinamedia.com
Magazine :: http://www.boxesandarrows.com
Product :: http://www.publicsquarehq.com
Personal :: http://www.eleganthack.com
Book :: http://www.blueprintsfortheweb.com

cwodtke at eleganthack.com

Comments

22 Sep 2007 - 4:30pm
Nancy Broden
2005

On 9/22/07, Christina Wodtke <cwodtke at eleganthack.com> wrote:
> It brings up the question "Are Social Networks, Media and Software the
> new third place?"

Much of my work is now focused on issues related to social networks
and mobility, and your question relates to a key trend I have
observed.

Location independence is a significant outcome of the tight
integration of personal communication devices into our daily lives.
This means that we no longer need to be in a given physical location
in order to satisfy emotional needs that could only previously be met
at home, work, shopping mall, etc. The "third place" you mention is
our mobile virtual space that co-exists (and/or sometimes conflicts)
with our physical circumstances.

What is interesting is that we frequently opt into these virtual
spaces not only when at work or home, when lonely or bored, but even
when we are actively engaged with others. The interactions mediated by
our mobile devices, be it via SMS, IM, email or other, have
increasingly as much weight (sometimes more weight) than our physical
ones.

-- Nancy
--------------------------------------
nancy.broden at gmail.com

22 Sep 2007 - 4:54pm
Mark Schraad
2006

I'm probably in the old school camp here. I still refer real people,
live music and physical places to nearly anything digital. When I am
bored I tend to go for a run, pick up a book, put on some tunes... or
a combination of those.

That being said I am fascinated by the technology and am closely
watching (like the anthropologist that does not take notes) the
social network/virtual world being built. It has some advantages.
Living vicariously in a world that does not have physical
ramification... well is intriguing. I have never shot or punched
someone in the face. I have no real urge to do that, but when
watching the terminator I do kind of wonder what it would be like.
But I also think the physical damage done is the greater influence in
how that does feel. I am not sure that making dangerous things lack
consequences is even close to a fair substitute. That's why I think
linking video games to violent behavior is a bit dubious.

I have recently been using nike plus and I think it is very cool. It
links something I am already interested in, in the real world, with a
virtual community, much like this discussion group. While virtual/
digital is a wonderful bridge across geography, I can't imagine ever
preferring it to my real life. I barely have enough time to explore
everything I am interested in - in my current reality.

Mark

On Sep 22, 2007, at 3:35 PM, Christina Wodtke wrote:

> http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/BuildingCommunitieswithSo.html
>
> Reading Joel on Software's Building Communities with Software
> "The social scientist Ray Oldenburg talks about how humans need a
> third place, besides work and home, to meet with friends, have a beer,
> discuss the events of the day, and enjoy some human interaction.
> Coffee
> shops, bars, hair salons, beer gardens, pool halls, clubs, and other
> hangouts are as vital as factories, schools and apartments"
>
> It brings up the question "Are Social Networks, Media and Software the
> new third place?"
>
> Where does one go to assuage loneliness or boredom? Do you open
> Twitter?
> Swing by Facebook? Is email a third place? Is IM?
>

23 Sep 2007 - 10:08am
AndrewHInton
2007

Last year, I wondered about similar stuff in an article I did for the
ASIST Bulletin about Games, 3rd Places and IA:
http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Aug-06/hinton.html

In the last year, since writing that, I've come to realize that what
the Internet has done is efface the boundaries that made distinctions
between 1st, 2nd and 3rd places to begin with.

Nancy Broden's response to this is quite apt -- people can be at work
and still have 'presence' among their friends via IM or phone SMS.
Twittering, checking your Facebook feed, or just good old email --
all of them keep people connected to friends, family, and everyone
else all the time. (This list is a good example...)

Even when people are at bars where it's supposed to be a 3rd place
already, they're constantly texting on their phones. It's even worked
itself into our public body language -- texting is the new smoking.

According to lots of recent research, people who live separate,
parallel lives in cyberspace and meatspace, while an easy target for
anxious pundits, are relatively few. Most people are just mixing
digital in with everything else. Digital's definitely more
convenient, so I think it fills those empty moments that we used to
have to wait out until we could make a phone call or see friends in
person.

If a Bowling League was the old 3rd place, the new one is still being
in the Bowling League, but having a bulletin board about it, a
MySpace group, and texting your team-mates (and your friends who
aren't even there) during a tournament.

--
Andrew Hinton
inkblurt at gmail.com
www.inkblurt.com

On Sep 22, 2007, at 3:35 PM, Christina Wodtke wrote:

> http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/BuildingCommunitieswithSo.html
>
> Reading Joel on Software's Building Communities with Software
> "The social scientist Ray Oldenburg talks about how humans need a
> third place, besides work and home, to meet with friends, have a beer,
> discuss the events of the day, and enjoy some human interaction.
> Coffee
> shops, bars, hair salons, beer gardens, pool halls, clubs, and other
> hangouts are as vital as factories, schools and apartments"
>
> It brings up the question "Are Social Networks, Media and Software the
> new third place?"
>
> Where does one go to assuage loneliness or boredom? Do you open
> Twitter?
> Swing by Facebook? Is email a third place? Is IM?
>
>
> --
> Christina Wodtke
> Principal Instigator
> 415-577-2550
>
>
> Business :: http://www.cucinamedia.com
> Magazine :: http://www.boxesandarrows.com
> Product :: http://www.publicsquarehq.com
> Personal :: http://www.eleganthack.com
> Book :: http://www.blueprintsfortheweb.com
>
> cwodtke at eleganthack.com
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org

24 Sep 2007 - 3:54pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

In the times past, say, 50 thousands years ago, the leisure, exploration
and socialization were the defining elements in the daily life (in
Pleistocene the "work" week was 20-30 hours, and the work was social.
playful, not strictly utilitarian - Geoffrey Miller). Perhaps with the
social software we are heading back to those times, when we integrated all
three places in one.

An interesting take on "the third place" by Jeremy Rifkin:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNKBfcbJJmQ (3 min). The third place is the
place where we have rewarding "deep play". According to Rifkin, the third
place defines culture, should be considered the first place.

Oleh

On 9/22/07, Christina Wodtke <cwodtke at eleganthack.com> wrote:
>
> http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/BuildingCommunitieswithSo.html
>
> Reading Joel on Software's Building Communities with Software
> "The social scientist Ray Oldenburg talks about how humans need a
> third place, besides work and home, to meet with friends, have a beer,
> discuss the events of the day, and enjoy some human interaction. Coffee
> shops, bars, hair salons, beer gardens, pool halls, clubs, and other
> hangouts are as vital as factories, schools and apartments"
>
> It brings up the question "Are Social Networks, Media and Software the
> new third place?"
>
> Where does one go to assuage loneliness or boredom? Do you open Twitter?
> Swing by Facebook? Is email a third place? Is IM?
>
>
> --
> Christina Wodtke
> Principal Instigator
> 415-577-2550
>
>
> Business :: http://www.cucinamedia.com
> Magazine :: http://www.boxesandarrows.com
> Product :: http://www.publicsquarehq.com
> Personal :: http://www.eleganthack.com
> Book :: http://www.blueprintsfortheweb.com
>
> cwodtke at eleganthack.com
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is the Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

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