design thinking - just what is it?

18 Sep 2007 - 10:21am
6 years ago
13 replies
1867 reads
Mark Schraad
2006

On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught me off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step method.

"The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven and repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can employ to achieve extraordinary results."

I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design. Just curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?

Mark

story link:

http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html

Comments

18 Sep 2007 - 10:37am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 18 Sep 2007, at 16:21, Mark Schraad wrote:

> On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak
> Dziersk regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this
> article caught me off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather
> simple four step method.
>
> "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a
> proven and repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or
> profession can employ to achieve extraordinary results."
>
> I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections
> of methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for
> design. Just curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?

I'm definitely in the growing collection of methods camp :-)

This sort of article reminds me very much of the way agile has been
(over) simplified for the business press.

Adrian

18 Sep 2007 - 10:42am
SemanticWill
2007

Quickly googling it - design thinking is a methodology that is sweeping the
corporate offices of america - just like harvard business press and borders
bookstore will filled with books and articles about "Innovation" 2 years
ago, and "Creativity" before that, and "Leadership," before that -- in the
board rooms of america - i have noticed a trend that a new catch phrase for
something comes out - fashionably around September - and begins to catch on
- B-school professors catch on and write a couple of articles about it, or
books - and they sell like hot cakes to executives and wanna-be executives.
They offer saccarine flavored, watered down ideas to management (and make a
decent bank), and then they move on to the next buzz word or phrase.

His article's intended audience was not actually designers -
industrial/ixd/graphic etc. The intended audience was b-school grads, middle
managers and executives. So take it with about as much salt as you would
thinking that your going to learn to be a creative person by reason Harvard
Business Review.

On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk
> regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught me
> off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step method.
>
> "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven and
> repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can
> employ to achieve extraordinary results."
>
> I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
> methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design. Just
> curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
>
> Mark
>
> story link:
>
>
> http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
~ we

-------------------------------------
n: will evans
t: user experience architect
e: wkevans4 at gmail.com

-------------------------------------

18 Sep 2007 - 10:48am
SemanticWill
2007

To Further my point that actual designers are not the audience for watered
down, easy to digest, over-simplified claptrap like this:

http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/NussbaumOnDesign/archives/2007/06/ceos_must_be_de.html

http://www.agencynextpr.com/2007/06/30/design-thinking-is-the-new-management-methodology/

http://www.amazon.com/Thinking-Pro-Engineer-Mastering-Methodology/dp/1566900654

http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2005/october12/design-101205.html

The "design" revolution will not be televised. And you won't read it in
business week.

snark!

On 9/18/07, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Quickly googling it - design thinking is a methodology that is sweeping
> the corporate offices of america - just like harvard business press and
> borders bookstore will filled with books and articles about "Innovation" 2
> years ago, and "Creativity" before that, and "Leadership," before that -- in
> the board rooms of america - i have noticed a trend that a new catch phrase
> for something comes out - fashionably around September - and begins to catch
> on - B-school professors catch on and write a couple of articles about it,
> or books - and they sell like hot cakes to executives and wanna-be
> executives. They offer saccarine flavored, watered down ideas to management
> (and make a decent bank), and then they move on to the next buzz word or
> phrase.
>
> His article's intended audience was not actually designers -
> industrial/ixd/graphic etc. The intended audience was b-school grads, middle
> managers and executives. So take it with about as much salt as you would
> thinking that your going to learn to be a creative person by reason Harvard
> Business Review.
>
> On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> >
> > On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk
> > regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught me
> > off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step method.
> >
> > "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven and
> > repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can
> > employ to achieve extraordinary results."
> >
> > I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
> > methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design. Just
> > curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
> >
> > Mark
> >
> > story link:
> >
> >
> > http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> > Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ~ we
>
> -------------------------------------
> n: will evans
> t: user experience architect
> e: wkevans4 at gmail.com
>
> -------------------------------------

--
~ we

-------------------------------------
n: will evans
t: user experience architect
e: wkevans4 at gmail.com

-------------------------------------

18 Sep 2007 - 10:48am
ldebett
2004

This is funny and almost right out of the IxDA discussion list:

"Question; How many designers will it take to screw in a light bulb? Answer;
Why a light bulb?"

~Lisa

18 Sep 2007 - 10:33am
Marc Rettig
2004

Hi,
Well, you're *definitely* not going to get consensus on that question, but here's my take (as posted to Paula Thornton's recept post on the same question, here:
http://totalexperience.corante.com/archives/2007/08/31/design_thinking.php)...

. . . .
Two key characteristics of design thinking that come to mind:

EXPLORATORY MINDSET

(as opposed to "decision-making" mindset; see the excellent first essay
in "Managing as Designing", Boland and Collopy, for more on this)

Decision mindset: "I am going to identify all the alternatives, weigh their consequences, and choose one."

Design mindset: "Many of the alternatives are yet to be discovered,
and the true consequences of choosing any of them are difficult to be
sure of; let's iteratively explore the possibilities together,
discovering new ones and choosing as best we can at each step."

DESIGN PROCESS

Design thinking is built on confidence in The Design Process:

- understand the context you are addressing -- the people, relevant
activities and environments,... the forces at work that must necessarily
shape any workable solution

- try to conceive something that might serve the situation you've started to understand

- embody the potential solution in some form that lets you put it into the target context and see how it works

- this takes you back to the "understand" step, and around you go again

These two, for me, define "design thinking" for the extremely wide
variety of situations I've found myself addressing in my career.

The definition of "value," the shape of the working culture, choice of methods and tools,... the rest all follow.

- Marc Rettig

____________________________________________________________________________________
Building a website is a piece of cake. Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.
http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/webhosting

18 Sep 2007 - 11:01am
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

Any structured decision making indeed follows this simple problem-solving
protocol:

1: Define the problem
2: Create and consider many options - [this step is omitted in an
unstructured decision making, replaced by "best example": "there is a
tendency (mostly higher up the corporate food chain) to make decisions based
on someone elses success or failure"]
3: Refine selected directions
4: Pick the winner, execute

The methods and practices for each step could be varied. Take a look, for
example, at the variety of methods for brainstorming.

There is no conflict between the structure of the problem-solving protocol
and the methods to implement it, just like there is no conflict
between overall UCD process and variety of methods to implement it.

Oleh

PS Good point on current design hype in the corporate world.

On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk
> regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught me
> off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step method.
>
> "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven and
> repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can
> employ to achieve extraordinary results."
>
> I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
> methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design. Just
> curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
>
> Mark
>
> story link:
>
>
> http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is the Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

18 Sep 2007 - 11:12am
Phillip Hunter
2006

> ...actual designers are not the audience for watered
down, easy to digest, over-simplified claptrap like this...

Yes, but the people who [employ/work with/need to be understood and
influenced by] designers are.

ph

18 Sep 2007 - 11:13am
Todd Roberts
2005

I'm curious, is the issue with the "methodology" he presents or with the
superficiality of it? At the highest level I think the article is pretty on
target, but makes it sound much too easy by not delving into the guts of how
to accomplish each step. In that sense, it's really a framework he's
describing, not a methodology. It's in these methodological details where
the ever-growing collection of methods comes in.

Todd

On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk
> regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught me
> off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step method.
>
> "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven and
> repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can
> employ to achieve extraordinary results."
>
> I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
> methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design. Just
> curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
>
> Mark
>
> story link:
>
>
> http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

18 Sep 2007 - 11:37am
Jarod Tang
2007

Also google.
As Alan Kay say: The best way to predict the future is to invent it.
This may address the problem of why need design thinking, it is to predict
future. This also so called critical
thinking<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_thinking>(or we call it
adaptive thinking), which more emphasize on analyze/evaluate
and find the best way to adapt to it. Both for predict the future.
As other guys already said, it's more target to the none-designers, about
predict and decision making.

P.S. Just a quick thought. As designers work is to design, maybe the more
critical for ixd designer is to analyze before design. ;)
Cheers
-- Jarod

On 9/18/07, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Quickly googling it - design thinking is a methodology that is sweeping
> the
> corporate offices of america - just like harvard business press and
> borders
> bookstore will filled with books and articles about "Innovation" 2 years
> ago, and "Creativity" before that, and "Leadership," before that -- in the
> board rooms of america - i have noticed a trend that a new catch phrase
> for
> something comes out - fashionably around September - and begins to catch
> on
> - B-school professors catch on and write a couple of articles about it, or
> books - and they sell like hot cakes to executives and wanna-be
> executives.
> They offer saccarine flavored, watered down ideas to management (and make
> a
> decent bank), and then they move on to the next buzz word or phrase.
>
> His article's intended audience was not actually designers -
> industrial/ixd/graphic etc. The intended audience was b-school grads,
> middle
> managers and executives. So take it with about as much salt as you would
> thinking that your going to learn to be a creative person by reason
> Harvard
> Business Review.
>
> On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> >
> > On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk
> > regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught
> me
> > off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step
> method.
> >
> > "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven and
> > repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can
> > employ to achieve extraordinary results."
> >
> > I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
> > methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design. Just
> > curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
> >
> > Mark
> >
> > story link:
> >
> >
> >
> http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> > Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ~ we
>
> -------------------------------------
> n: will evans
> t: user experience architect
> e: wkevans4 at gmail.com
>
> -------------------------------------
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
IxD for better life style.

http://jarodtang.blogspot.com

18 Sep 2007 - 12:20pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Were I a business exec that was reading all of the hoopla about 'design thinking', and I read this my primary thought would be, 'is this all it is?' I agree, it is a framework. I guess I see the expansion of this framework, and all of the methods and techniques as the body of design thinking. Granted the article is not written for designers, and in fact written for non-designers. But the approach might have been a simple description, not a simplistic description. I think that same about the current wikipedia definition.

I also tend to include a lot of current thought regarding design... Bolland/Canopy as cited by Rettig, and nearly anything written byRoger Martin.

Mark

On Tuesday, September 18, 2007, at 12:15PM, "Todd Roberts" <trrobert at gmail.com> wrote:
>I'm curious, is the issue with the "methodology" he presents or with the
>superficiality of it? At the highest level I think the article is pretty on
>target, but makes it sound much too easy by not delving into the guts of how
>to accomplish each step. In that sense, it's really a framework he's
>describing, not a methodology. It's in these methodological details where
>the ever-growing collection of methods comes in.
>
>Todd
>
>
>On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>>
>> On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk
>> regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught me
>> off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step method.
>>
>> "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven and
>> repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession can
>> employ to achieve extraordinary results."
>>
>> I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
>> methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design. Just
>> curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
>>
>> Mark
>>
>> story link:
>>
>>
>> http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html

18 Sep 2007 - 12:24pm
SemanticWill
2007

>From my actual reading of the articles - first - an internalized process for
designers and creatives to achieve best efforts and outcomes certainly
warrants 'some' methodology and their's maybe no better or worse than others
- but - huge but - following that methodology will not make one line manager
a designer - or a creative - and that is implied in the articles. And
managers/executives who mandate a methodology is not going to turn an
inherently uncreative group of direct reports into better designers - or
creators.
The one guaranteed outcome of the articles and books is that it will lead to
more speaking engagements for those that write them.

On 9/18/07, Jarod Tang <jarod.tang at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Also google.
> As Alan Kay say: The best way to predict the future is to invent it.
> This may address the problem of why need design thinking, it is to predict
> future. This also so called critical thinking<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_thinking>(or we call it adaptive thinking), which more emphasize on analyze/evaluate
> and find the best way to adapt to it. Both for predict the future.
> As other guys already said, it's more target to the none-designers, about
> predict and decision making.
>
> P.S. Just a quick thought. As designers work is to design, maybe the more
> critical for ixd designer is to analyze before design. ;)
> Cheers
> -- Jarod
>
> On 9/18/07, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Quickly googling it - design thinking is a methodology that is sweeping
> > the
> > corporate offices of america - just like harvard business press and
> > borders
> > bookstore will filled with books and articles about "Innovation" 2 years
> >
> > ago, and "Creativity" before that, and "Leadership," before that -- in
> > the
> > board rooms of america - i have noticed a trend that a new catch phrase
> > for
> > something comes out - fashionably around September - and begins to catch
> > on
> > - B-school professors catch on and write a couple of articles about it,
> > or
> > books - and they sell like hot cakes to executives and wanna-be
> > executives.
> > They offer saccarine flavored, watered down ideas to management (and
> > make a
> > decent bank), and then they move on to the next buzz word or phrase.
> >
> > His article's intended audience was not actually designers -
> > industrial/ixd/graphic etc. The intended audience was b-school grads,
> > middle
> > managers and executives. So take it with about as much salt as you would
> > thinking that your going to learn to be a creative person by reason
> > Harvard
> > Business Review.
> >
> > On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad < mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak Dziersk
> > > regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article caught
> > me
> > > off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step
> > method.
> > >
> > > "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven
> > and
> > > repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession
> > can
> > > employ to achieve extraordinary results."
> > >
> > > I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
> > > methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design.
> > Just
> > > curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
> > >
> > > Mark
> > >
> > > story link:
> > >
> > >
> > > http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html
> >
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> > > List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> > > Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > > Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> > > Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > ~ we
> >
> > -------------------------------------
> > n: will evans
> > t: user experience architect
> > e: wkevans4 at gmail.com
> >
> > -------------------------------------
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> > Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
> >
>
>
>
> --
> IxD for better life style.
>
> http://jarodtang.blogspot.com

--
~ we

-------------------------------------
n: will evans
t: user experience architect
e: wkevans4 at gmail.com

-------------------------------------

18 Sep 2007 - 1:20pm
Doris Lamontagne
2005

The concept of design thinking comes from the architecture and urban planning fields. In 1994, Peter G. Rowe published the book tilted 'Design Thinking" at the MIT Press. Many aspects of the design approach presented in the book apply nicely to the 'design process' in general.

cheers,

doris

Get a sneak peak at messages with a handy reading pane with All new Yahoo! Mail: http://mrd.mail.yahoo.com/try_beta?.intl=ca

18 Sep 2007 - 2:41pm
SemanticWill
2007

Those who cannot design, manage. Those that can't manage - write design
process books for those managers that can't design.

:-)

On 9/18/07, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> From my actual reading of the articles - first - an internalized process
> for designers and creatives to achieve best efforts and outcomes certainly
> warrants 'some' methodology and their's maybe no better or worse than others
> - but - huge but - following that methodology will not make one line manager
> a designer - or a creative - and that is implied in the articles. And
> managers/executives who mandate a methodology is not going to turn an
> inherently uncreative group of direct reports into better designers - or
> creators.
> The one guaranteed outcome of the articles and books is that it will lead
> to more speaking engagements for those that write them.
>
> On 9/18/07, Jarod Tang <jarod.tang at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Also google.
> > As Alan Kay say: The best way to predict the future is to invent it.
> > This may address the problem of why need design thinking, it is to
> > predict future. This also so called critical thinking<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_thinking>(or we call it adaptive thinking), which more emphasize on analyze/evaluate
> > and find the best way to adapt to it. Both for predict the future.
> > As other guys already said, it's more target to the none-designers,
> > about predict and decision making.
> >
> > P.S. Just a quick thought. As designers work is to design, maybe the
> > more critical for ixd designer is to analyze before design. ;)
> > Cheers
> > -- Jarod
> >
> > On 9/18/07, W Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > Quickly googling it - design thinking is a methodology that is
> > > sweeping the
> > > corporate offices of america - just like harvard business press and
> > > borders
> > > bookstore will filled with books and articles about "Innovation" 2
> > > years
> > > ago, and "Creativity" before that, and "Leadership," before that -- in
> > > the
> > > board rooms of america - i have noticed a trend that a new catch
> > > phrase for
> > > something comes out - fashionably around September - and begins to
> > > catch on
> > > - B-school professors catch on and write a couple of articles about
> > > it, or
> > > books - and they sell like hot cakes to executives and wanna-be
> > > executives.
> > > They offer saccarine flavored, watered down ideas to management (and
> > > make a
> > > decent bank), and then they move on to the next buzz word or phrase.
> > >
> > > His article's intended audience was not actually designers -
> > > industrial/ixd/graphic etc. The intended audience was b-school grads,
> > > middle
> > > managers and executives. So take it with about as much salt as you
> > > would
> > > thinking that your going to learn to be a creative person by reason
> > > Harvard
> > > Business Review.
> > >
> > > On 9/18/07, Mark Schraad < mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > On the Fast Company site there is currently an article by Mak
> > > Dziersk
> > > > regarding design thinking. I do not know Mark, but this article
> > > caught me
> > > > off gaurd. He posits design thinking as a rather simple four step
> > > method.
> > > >
> > > > "The methodology commonly referred to as design thinking is a proven
> > > and
> > > > repeatable problem-solving protocol that any business or profession
> > > can
> > > > employ to achieve extraordinary results."
> > > >
> > > > I have alwasy thought of design thinking as a growing collections of
> > > > methods. What is presented is a simple for step process for design.
> > > Just
> > > > curious, is this how everyone else views design thinking?
> > > >
> > > > Mark
> > > >
> > > > story link:
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > http://www.fastcompany.com/resources/design/dziersk/design-thinking-083107.html
> > >
> > > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > > > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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> > > > Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > ~ we
> > >
> > > -------------------------------------
> > > n: will evans
> > > t: user experience architect
> > > e: wkevans4 at gmail.com
> > >
> > > -------------------------------------
> > > ________________________________________________________________
> > > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > > List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> > > List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> > > Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > > Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> > > Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > IxD for better life style.
> >
> > http://jarodtang.blogspot.com
>
>
>
>
> --
> ~ we
>
> -------------------------------------
> n: will evans
> t: user experience architect
> e: wkevans4 at gmail.com
>
> -------------------------------------
>

--
~ we

-------------------------------------
n: will evans
t: user experience architect
e: wkevans4 at gmail.com

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