Seam carving - Image resizing technique

23 Aug 2007 - 10:47pm
7 years ago
5 replies
759 reads
Deepak Pakhare
2005

Hi,
This may not be entirely on topic but seems relevant since it is touted to
change the way images are displayed on the web. Some of you may have come
across this already.
http://www.dpreview.com/news/0708/07082201seamcarvingimageresizing.asp

It didn't take me long to realize that this technique does what it does
indiscriminately and is an assault on the integrity of a photographic image.
Current techniques allow designers/artists to resize raster images while
maintaining aspect ratios, detail and proportions.

After the video plays out, there are several related videos in the dock
within the viewer. I recommend that you see the 2nd video response from
Lance Campeau (www.lancecampeau.com). I agree with what he has to say in his
video.
What do you guys think?

Best,
Deepak

Comments

24 Aug 2007 - 7:17am
bminihan
2007

Thanks for sharing...I agree with the response, as well, but would go a little further and limit the use of this tool purely to either web site layout images or business presentations (charts, graphs). As a cartoonist and illustrator, I would have the same objection to someone using this technique to distort vector art that I create, as much as he objects to manipulation of his photography...

Interesting technique tho, with lots of possibilities...

- Bryan
http://www.bryanminihan.com

---- Deepak Pakhare <deepux at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi,
> This may not be entirely on topic but seems relevant since it is touted to
> change the way images are displayed on the web. Some of you may have come
> across this already.
> http://www.dpreview.com/news/0708/07082201seamcarvingimageresizing.asp
>
> It didn't take me long to realize that this technique does what it does
> indiscriminately and is an assault on the integrity of a photographic image.
> Current techniques allow designers/artists to resize raster images while
> maintaining aspect ratios, detail and proportions.
>
> After the video plays out, there are several related videos in the dock
> within the viewer. I recommend that you see the 2nd video response from
> Lance Campeau (www.lancecampeau.com). I agree with what he has to say in his
> video.
> What do you guys think?
>
> Best,
> Deepak
> ________________________________________________________________
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--

24 Aug 2007 - 7:37am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

After seeing your post, I blogged about this last night. An edited
version:

How is this technology to be used? Should it be employed as a generic
capability within a browser? I could set a preference to "carve"
images when a page resizes, keeping the images in proportion to the
page (based on some default). Or maybe I could do it manually to any
graphic on a web page.

I'm not comfortable with that application. The integrity of
photographs and other imagery would be compromised. Certainly, I've
learned to design a page to have a flexible layout, but I'm designing
the page to have a flexible layout. I'm not just leaving it to
chance. Will I have to design images to "carve" gracefully in the
future?

A more palatable option would be to have the capability in my design
toolbox. I can imagine, while setting up a page in Dreamweaver,
specifying a heading with a "carve-able" background photo. I select a
photo (or shoot one) with carving in mind. In Photoshop, I can select
areas that I want to leave unaffected. The image gets a special tag
that a browser recognizes, indicating that it should carve it.

Unsurprisingly, I have problems when the new technology threatens my
control over what the viewer sees. When the technology is under my
control, it's a powerful tool.

- from http://designaday.tumblr.com/

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

The public is more familiar with
bad design than good design.
It is, in effect, conditioned
to prefer bad design, because
that is what it lives with.
The new becomes threatening,
the old reassuring.

- Paul Rand

24 Aug 2007 - 7:49am
bminihan
2007

I agree...just thinking this through a little bit more...I didn't see mention (I didn't have a chance to see all the responses or dig very far) of how this technique affects text and legibility. With sites across the net embedding copy text, headlines, titles, labels etc into images, I can imagine issues cropping up (no pun intended) if a feature like this were embedded in browsers and wasn't under the designers/developer's control. Of course, embedding text in images already has its own problems =]

- Bryan
http://www.bryanminihan.com

---- Jack Moffett <jmoffett at inmedius.com> wrote:

>
> Unsurprisingly, I have problems when the new technology threatens my
> control over what the viewer sees. When the technology is under my
> control, it's a powerful tool.
>
> - from http://designaday.tumblr.com/

24 Aug 2007 - 8:35am
Coryndon Luxmoore
2004

This discussion reminds me of the concerns I first heard "print" graphic designers first faced the idea of a dynamic page layout. Artists and designers will have to continue to add design rules and requirements to make sure that automatic techniques like this don't adversely affect the content and integrity of the image. Clearly this could be very useful for graphic backgrounds and photographic design elements but the real gray area will be in photo journalism.

I was very happy to see that the designer/artist has control over the dynamic behavior of the images. I could easily see more sophisticated controls over time that would allow the user to make illustration scale well down to an icon be setting the elements to be dropped and enhanced as it is being scaled. This could address nicely some of the issues I have with the massive/tiny icons in OS X or Windows.

Looking forward to it being added to a OS myself as long as I am in control ;) --C

-------------------------------------
Coryndon Luxmoore
Interaction Designer

coryndon at luxmoore.com
------------------------------------

24 Aug 2007 - 9:18am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Aug 24, 2007, at 10:09 AM, Cecilia Case wrote:

> just that this will really only work on content-free or content-
> limited pictures)...

It ain't necessarily so. If you watch the video, you will see that
they demonstrate a method by which certain areas of an image can be
marked for carving (and I assume the opposite would be possible as
well). So, the areas of the image that contain important content
could be marked such that they don't lose pixels. The whole point of
the technique is to lose the "content-free" portions of the image.

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

I am in search of the
simple elegant seductive
maybe even obvious IDEA.
With this in my pocket
I cannot fail.

- Tibor Kalman

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