References on Television and Experiments on Interactive Television

15 Aug 2007 - 3:54am
7 years ago
1 reply
530 reads
Kumar
2007

I have taken up to do some project on Interactive Television as a part of my
curriculum at Interaction Design, IDC, IIT Bombay

Can you guide me as to what should I look at to start with regards to
current and future trends of market and social needs.

There is also a burning question in my mind. Is TV going to stay there? And
what kind of more experiences are peope looking at?
If there are any statistics regarding this it would be helpful to me.

Thanks,
--
Kumar Ahir
Interaction Design, M. Des
IDC, IIT Bombay

Comments

15 Aug 2007 - 5:39am
Stew Dean
2007

On 15/08/07, Kumar Ahir <kumar.ahir at gmail.com> wrote:

> There is also a burning question in my mind. Is TV going to stay there? And
> what kind of more experiences are peope looking at?
> If there are any statistics regarding this it would be helpful to me.

Hi Kumar,

I currently work in Interactive TV in the UK and have on and off for
some years. The first question 'is TV going to stay there?' I presume
do you mean will it be replaced by the Internet. Well the answer is
yes and no.

Currently in the UK there are three major platforms for Interactive
TV, Sky which uses OpenTV, Cable (now Virgin) and Digital Terrestrial
Television (DTT) which uses Mheg. Then there are a bunch of new
services, such as Tiscali (formerly Homechoice) that use ADSL and BT
Vision that uses both ADSL for Video On Demand and DTT for live TV,
the BT Vision box also allows programmes to be recorded. The trend is
towards 'IPTV' - that is TV that uses internet technology to deliver
TV and indirectly also delivers interactivity through web type clients
(the cable platforms in the UK have been HTML based for years).

I'm currently working on defining the user experience for one of these
IPTV platforms and find myself saying a lot 'This is NOT web on TV'.
Nor are services like Joost really any big challenge to TV as we know
it.

Live TV provides a lean back experience that you only really get with
a remote, a TV and your favourite seat in the living room. Being able
to then watch what you want, when you want is a bonus and enhances
things. Then being able to play games, buy pizzas, vote on big brother
and bet on a horse are further enhancements but these need to be
integrated with the whole user experience - with live TV being the
driving point.

The ability to sit, relax, and be entertained is user experience has
yet to be matched by any non TV contender. Closest there is are game
consoles.

In terms of figures, I used to present on this quite often at
conferences but my slides are now all out of date by four years having
done freelance web work for a while. I can tell you that in terms of
interactive content on interactive TV the main draws are: Games,
Betting and Travel. Then come things like buying Pizzas. Buying on TV
(T-commerce) will always be a side issue compared to more
entertainment based things.

The best source of information on interactive TV is Tracy Swedlow's
ITVtoday that, although very US biased, provides good news and
information including screen shots of many itv applications.

See..

http://www.itvt.com

Stew Dean

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