Multi-channel user interface design

12 Aug 2007 - 3:03pm
7 years ago
18 replies
1866 reads
oliver green
2006

Hi all,

Are there any particular design methods that help while designing UIs that
are available via multiple channels. e.g. items can be bought using an a)
online store; b) over the phone; c) or ordered using an in-store kiosk.

How can I create UIs that provide a consistent user experience? Each channel
will be implemented by different teams. What kind of design documents can be
created to communicate the design to various teams etc. If a particular team
runs into a problem with a design, how can changes be made to each UI
channel to reflect changes (if any)?

Thanks,
Oliver

Comments

12 Aug 2007 - 6:45pm
oliver green
2006

Also, in a similar vein, if I want to retrofit an existing website to
be more accessible on mobile devices, would you recommend :

A) creating a parallel website for mobile?
Advantages: mobile website can be designed to fit the contextual
environment of the user; offer features that would be useful in a
mobile setting.
Disadvantage: support two parallel websites...

B) create a mobile "skin" for the existing website? the above
advantages and disadvantages are flipped for this option.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

12 Aug 2007 - 9:32pm
.pauric
2006

Oliver: : "Are there any particular design methods that help while
designing UIs that are available via multiple channels. e.g. items
can be bought using an a) online store; b) over the phone;"

I suggest defining personas in the normal fashion but complementing
those definitions with something best described as 'mindsets'

You might have a single persona use the web, then go over to the
phone. The scenario could be that they were looking for some support
via the web and got frustrated, they then chose to shortcut to human
support via the telephone.

Same user, different mindset in this hypothetical & simplistic
example.

I think that additional constraint might help you iterate some
resolution in to the different contexts.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

13 Aug 2007 - 8:08am
Morten Hjerde
2007

On 8/12/07, oliver green <oliverhci at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> How can I create UIs that provide a consistent user experience?

In most cases I would advice against going that route.

If I'm going to offer some general advice without knowing anything about
your application, I would suggest you find the use-cases that are specific
to mobile. DOnt try to make the same functionality available on the phone as
on the PC. The usability reward of sitting down with a big screen is too big
to make this worthwhile. Find the stuff that is important to the user in
situations where the user can not use his/her laptop. You will likely to end
up with 10% as much functionality on the phone which sounds about right.

--
Morten Hjerde
http://sender11.typepad.com

13 Aug 2007 - 9:47am
Phillip Hunter
2006

Oliver,

> The scenario could be that they were looking for some support
> via the web and got frustrated, they then chose to shortcut to human
> support via the telephone.

Another scenario can be that the customer prefers telephone interaction.

Are you needing to consider design for telephone-based applications (voice
or DTMF, not mobile web)?

ph

13 Aug 2007 - 10:30am
.pauric
2006

Philip: "Another scenario can be that the customer prefers telephone
interaction. "

I would feel that data point belonged in the Persona definition not
the scenario. As such it might fall outside an 80/20 rule when
fleshing out your set of personas..

Mindsets as I prescribe them in single user, multi ui design
transgress the UI, are based on context and belong to the user. As
such they add something of a cross reference when working with
definitions like persona or scenarios.

In practical terms this has helped me pare down the amount of
information presented in a computer network wiring closet, because
its a predominately 'stressful' environment. Extended the verbage
in a web ui because research has shown a significant number of users
fire up the gui when 'learning' about new functionality. And,
helped define command auto-complete for the CLI because those users
spend a lot of time in a 'flow' mindset.

This can all be the same persona and scenarios dont really capture
what an individual person might be thinking about or what has placed
them at that particular ui at that point in time.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

13 Aug 2007 - 11:20am
Phillip Hunter
2006

Pauric,

> I would feel that data point belonged in the Persona definition not
> the scenario.

Ah, yes, I agree, so let me be more precise. The additional scenario is
that of the first contact being via the phone channel. That will lead to a
discussion of different priorities versus the telephone being used as a
secondary contact for support.

> As such it might fall outside an 80/20 rule when
> fleshing out your set of personas..

If by this, you imply that considering a phone preference is not worth it,
bear in mind that in some industries, the phone channel dominates 80% or
greater of the contacts by consumers and interaction via that method has
some very significantly different considerations. This is frequently
overlooked by companies as they make overarching design decisions.

ph

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of pauric
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2007 12:30 PM
To: discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Multi-channel user interface design

Philip: "Another scenario can be that the customer prefers telephone
interaction. "

I would feel that data point belonged in the Persona definition not
the scenario. As such it might fall outside an 80/20 rule when
fleshing out your set of personas..

Mindsets as I prescribe them in single user, multi ui design
transgress the UI, are based on context and belong to the user. As
such they add something of a cross reference when working with
definitions like persona or scenarios.

In practical terms this has helped me pare down the amount of
information presented in a computer network wiring closet, because
its a predominately 'stressful' environment. Extended the verbage
in a web ui because research has shown a significant number of users
fire up the gui when 'learning' about new functionality. And,
helped define command auto-complete for the CLI because those users
spend a lot of time in a 'flow' mindset.

This can all be the same persona and scenarios dont really capture
what an individual person might be thinking about or what has placed
them at that particular ui at that point in time.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

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13 Aug 2007 - 11:32am
Joseph Selbie
2007

I have been watching this discussion with great interest. I think that,
sooner or later, this will be a common challenge for all interaction design
teams. I was hoping to see that others would post well proven methodologies
for design, or well established solutions to common problems. So far, at
least, there have been good suggestions, but it doesn't appear there are
established processes.

Are there emerging (or established) interaction design methodologies that
specifically address the challenge of working across web, mobile and
telephony?

Joseph Selbie
http://www.tristream.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of pauric
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2007 9:30 AM
To: discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Multi-channel user interface design

Philip: "Another scenario can be that the customer prefers telephone
interaction. "

I would feel that data point belonged in the Persona definition not
the scenario. As such it might fall outside an 80/20 rule when
fleshing out your set of personas..

Mindsets as I prescribe them in single user, multi ui design
transgress the UI, are based on context and belong to the user. As
such they add something of a cross reference when working with
definitions like persona or scenarios.

In practical terms this has helped me pare down the amount of
information presented in a computer network wiring closet, because
its a predominately 'stressful' environment. Extended the verbage
in a web ui because research has shown a significant number of users
fire up the gui when 'learning' about new functionality. And,
helped define command auto-complete for the CLI because those users
spend a lot of time in a 'flow' mindset.

This can all be the same persona and scenarios dont really capture
what an individual person might be thinking about or what has placed
them at that particular ui at that point in time.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
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13 Aug 2007 - 12:05pm
Morten Hjerde
2007

Joseph
I have done quite a bit of work in this area and I can offer my 2c.

When I am involved with client work there is often an existing website or
application and the client want a "mobile version".
Attempts to create a mobile version of a CRM application, intranet or
whatever has a failure rate of about 100%. (yes, I'm painting with broad
strokes here.)
Using the mobile phone as a satellite or companion to the existing solution
has a lot higher chance of success.

This means that the process, and methods we use in these cases are really
geared towards discovering
and designing how the phone can work as a companion to the existing
product/solution. Often we find that the website
or application has to be changed in the process.

The methodology is not really that different... I guess we do quite a bit of
reality mapping and task analysis in order to find the synergies.

Morten

On 8/13/07, Joseph Selbie <jselbie at tristream.com> wrote:
>
> I have been watching this discussion with great interest. I think that,
> sooner or later, this will be a common challenge for all interaction
> design
> teams. I was hoping to see that others would post well proven
> methodologies
> for design, or well established solutions to common problems. So far, at
> least, there have been good suggestions, but it doesn't appear there are
> established processes.
>
> Are there emerging (or established) interaction design methodologies that
> specifically address the challenge of working across web, mobile and
> telephony?
>
> Joseph Selbie
> http://www.tristream.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
> pauric
> Sent: Monday, August 13, 2007 9:30 AM
> To: discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Multi-channel user interface design
>
> Philip: "Another scenario can be that the customer prefers telephone
> interaction. "
>
> I would feel that data point belonged in the Persona definition not
> the scenario. As such it might fall outside an 80/20 rule when
> fleshing out your set of personas..
>
> Mindsets as I prescribe them in single user, multi ui design
> transgress the UI, are based on context and belong to the user. As
> such they add something of a cross reference when working with
> definitions like persona or scenarios.
>
> In practical terms this has helped me pare down the amount of
> information presented in a computer network wiring closet, because
> its a predominately 'stressful' environment. Extended the verbage
> in a web ui because research has shown a significant number of users
> fire up the gui when 'learning' about new functionality. And,
> helped define command auto-complete for the CLI because those users
> spend a lot of time in a 'flow' mindset.
>
> This can all be the same persona and scenarios dont really capture
> what an individual person might be thinking about or what has placed
> them at that particular ui at that point in time.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
Morten Hjerde
http://sender11.typepad.com

13 Aug 2007 - 12:05pm
oliver green
2006

>>Are there emerging (or established) interaction design methodologies
that specifically address the challenge of working across web, mobile
and telephony?

So far I have not been able to find any.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

13 Aug 2007 - 1:47pm
Barbara Ballard
2005

We've been working out a class-based design process to address the
myriad device types and interaction types. The tentative process is:

1. Identify major classes of target devices. Computer, "smart"
phones, phones, TV, voice, etc.
2. Do research to identify desired functionality for each category.
3. Separately design things with wildly different interaction (e.g.,
voice only)
4. Design flows for all other applications.
- do NOT assume they will be the same
- do NOT assume the user needs or features are the same
- do keep them consistent with mental models
5. Where relevant, use common elements - optimized for device class -
within the design.
6. Keep colors and to a lesser extent relative component placement consistent.
7. Fill out details using a device hierarchy and hierarchical patterns.

You can find more details (focused on mobile) at
http://patterns.littlespringsdesign.com

--
Barbara Ballard
barbara at littlespringsdesign.com 1-785-838-3003

13 Aug 2007 - 2:09pm
Will Parker
2007

On Aug 12, 2007, at 2:03 PM, oliver green wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Are there any particular design methods that help while designing
> UIs that
> are available via multiple channels. e.g. items can be bought using
> an a)
> online store; b) over the phone; c) or ordered using an in-store
> kiosk.

I can't speak to the larger question of design documentation, but
like several others before me in this thread, I'd advise against
cramming all three designs into the same straitjacket.

As background, let me first say that I was a member of the team that
recently redesigned the flagship US stores for an international cell
phone carrier. We worked on store design, including touch-screen
kiosks, and integration with that carrier's existing web and cell-
phone stores. What follows is a necessarily abbreviated version of
what we found during the redesign project.

-----------------

Regarding phones, the huge disparity between the screen size and
keyboard of the phone and the other two devices is certainly going to
force you to offer a different workflow for the phone-bound user.
Instead of large single screens offering a wide variety of
functionality, you're going to be building wizard-like sequences of
windows, targeted at single tasks. (Don't even get me started on the
design of auditory interfaces, which are arguably superior for phones.)

Further, you'll find yourself trimming major bits of functionality
from the phone version, starting with most of the account management
features, and that will require additional compromises. On top of
this, add the strong probability that you will need to account for
several different phone browsers, and you've already accumulated
enough woe for the phone dev team.

So forget about using a similar design for the phone environment.
Find a design that works for a wide range of phones, and consider
whether you can go with a voice-oriented interface if your product is
something people might want to buy while on the move.

Regarding the web and kiosk design, think of the user environment for
the two cases.

The web store will be used by people (theoretically) in control of
their time and their immediate environment. They can browse freely in
a reasonably secure environment. They can take the time to compare
similar offerings from other vendors. In most cases, they _will_ take
all the time and thought required to feel confident that they have
made the right choice. They will have chosen the most comfortable,
least distracting location available for their shopping time, and
they _will_ be sitting down.

These are people who want to know .... well, everything about your
product. Make them happy.

Compare the environment around the kiosk.

The users will be away from their home or office, in an unfamiliar
environment. Being away from home or office, they are likely to be
under a certain amount of pressure to finish shopping and get back to
their other responsibilities. They will have no privacy, and standard
data entry screens will make them worry about the people nearby. They
will NOT have seen your kiosk UI before, and you should assume that
none of them are in a mood to learn anything new unless it's
regarding your product(s).

They most likely will *not* be sitting comfortably, and they may be
forced to stand. They will have no opportunity to make comparisons
with other vendors' products, and little chance to consider whether
they are making the right choice before submitting their order. A
salesperson may be breathing down their neck offering to help them
decide (if the company hasn't had the good sense to quietly shoot all
of that breed.)

No matter how good the sales pitch has been, these shoppers will be,
to some degree, fundamentally unhappy people.

They are in a time crunch, they're uncomfortable, and they need
quick, definitive reassurance (with a moderate dose of levity) to get
them to Yes. They don't want facts so much as they want a promise of
quick, trouble-free solutions with no regrets attached.

That suggests a very different design solution than the web store,
doesn't it? It certainly did when we approached the problem, and so
the store kiosks bear little resemblance to the client's online
presence.

What, then, do you have in the way of common design features? Where
is the value in consistency, except in the area of branding?

> How can I create UIs that provide a consistent user experience?
> Each channel
> will be implemented by different teams. What kind of design
> documents can be
> created to communicate the design to various teams etc. If a
> particular team
> runs into a problem with a design, how can changes be made to each UI
> channel to reflect changes (if any)?

- Will

Will Parker
wparker at ChannelingDesign.com

“I wish developing great products was as easy as writing a check. If
that were the case, then Microsoft would have great products.” -
Steve Jobs

13 Aug 2007 - 3:33pm
Stew Dean
2007

On 12/08/07, oliver green <oliverhci at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Are there any particular design methods that help while designing UIs that
> are available via multiple channels. e.g. items can be bought using an a)
> online store; b) over the phone; c) or ordered using an in-store kiosk.
>
> How can I create UIs that provide a consistent user experience? Each channel
> will be implemented by different teams. What kind of design documents can be
> created to communicate the design to various teams etc. If a particular team
> runs into a problem with a design, how can changes be made to each UI
> channel to reflect changes (if any)?

My first reaction is don't get hung up on consistency - each different
type of device needs a different type of interface, this can be tied
together by visual design but there is no point forcing the user
experience to be the same on the web as it is on a kiosk.

By the sounds if it you need to define an interaction guide that
covers different aspects of the user experience, like filling in a
certain form, and try and define it for each platform you're aiming
for. There's not magic way of designing for all platforms at once and
it's not just a reskinning effort as often flows can change, amounts
of screens alter and input methods can be different. It can be driven
from the same data and have use the same delivery technology but if
the user device behaves differently the User Experience has to change
with it.

--
Stewart Dean

17 Aug 2007 - 7:47pm
dszuc
2005

Some pieces here on communications (can think about this as "overarching
ideas" when designing for different channels)

* Rediscovering Communication -
http://www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/000213.php

* Choosing the Right Channel for Communicating with Customers -
http://www.apogeehk.com/articles/the_right_channel.html

Questions ...

Q1: Who does mobile banking well today?

Q2: What sort of banking tasks would you want to complete on your mobile
phone today? (given screen size, context, data plans, issues etc)

Rgds,

Daniel Szuc
Principal Usability Consultant
Apogee Usability Asia Ltd
www.apogeehk.com
'Usability in Asia'

The Usability Kit - http://www.theusabilitykit.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of oliver
green
Sent: Monday, 13 August 2007 5:03 AM
To: discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Multi-channel user interface design

Hi all,

Are there any particular design methods that help while designing UIs that
are available via multiple channels. e.g. items can be bought using an a)
online store; b) over the phone; c) or ordered using an in-store kiosk.

How can I create UIs that provide a consistent user experience? Each channel
will be implemented by different teams. What kind of design documents can be
created to communicate the design to various teams etc. If a particular team
runs into a problem with a design, how can changes be made to each UI
channel to reflect changes (if any)?

Thanks,
Oliver
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org List Guidelines ............
http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines List Help ..................
http://beta.ixda.org/help Unsubscribe ................
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Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org

18 Aug 2007 - 5:01pm
Stew Dean
2007

Daniel,

You asked...

> Q1: Who does mobile banking well today?

Nearly all banks offer mobile banking, see answer to next question...

> Q2: What sort of banking tasks would you want to complete on your mobile
> phone today? (given screen size, context, data plans, issues etc)

The issue is why would you use the screen when you can phone someone
up? I use my mobile phone for banking a lot of the time by calling
people - as it's often quick and effective. If I was designing a next
generation interactive experience for mobile phones I'd start with the
premise people like to talk to people and then see how I can enhance
that. I have viewed my balance via WAP but, in general, it's far
quicker just to call someone.

If you are starting with the concept that you must do things on screen
you are no longer designing the experience but carrying out an
engineering project in my view.

The right channel in this case includes considering the voice channel
- which is often far more interactive than a screen anyway!

--
Stewart Dean

18 Aug 2007 - 7:15pm
dszuc
2005

Thanks Stew:

"The issue is why would you use the screen when you can phone someone up?" -
Spot on!

That's the core of my question 2. Are there any banking tasks that are more
suited to the mobile/cell phone as opposed to calling someone? Are there
times or reasons where you would want to use/have used the mobile/cell phone
for certain tasks (rather than calling someone).

Perhaps the same could have been said of ATM's 20-25 years ago where people
would have said "I prefer going into the branch and speaking with someone to
withdraw my money or check my balance" but now its about speed and
efficiency (and less about conversation)

Thoughts?

Rgds,

Daniel Szuc
Principal Usability Consultant
Apogee Usability Asia Ltd
www.apogeehk.com
'Usability in Asia'

The Usability Kit - http://www.theusabilitykit.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Stew Dean [mailto:stewdean at gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, 19 August 2007 7:01 AM
To: Daniel Szuc
Cc: oliver green; discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Multi-channel user interface design

Daniel,

You asked...

> Q1: Who does mobile banking well today?

Nearly all banks offer mobile banking, see answer to next question...

> Q2: What sort of banking tasks would you want to complete on your
> mobile phone today? (given screen size, context, data plans, issues
> etc)

The issue is why would you use the screen when you can phone someone up? I
use my mobile phone for banking a lot of the time by calling people - as
it's often quick and effective. If I was designing a next generation
interactive experience for mobile phones I'd start with the premise people
like to talk to people and then see how I can enhance that. I have viewed
my balance via WAP but, in general, it's far quicker just to call someone.

If you are starting with the concept that you must do things on screen you
are no longer designing the experience but carrying out an engineering
project in my view.

The right channel in this case includes considering the voice channel
- which is often far more interactive than a screen anyway!

--
Stewart Dean

19 Aug 2007 - 7:09pm
Barbara Ballard
2005

On 8/18/07, Daniel Szuc <dszuc at apogeehk.com> wrote:
> "The issue is why would you use the screen when you can phone someone up?" -
> Spot on!
>
> That's the core of my question 2. Are there any banking tasks that are more
> suited to the mobile/cell phone as opposed to calling someone? Are there
> times or reasons where you would want to use/have used the mobile/cell phone
> for certain tasks (rather than calling someone).

Yes, absolutely -- but perhaps not in the directions you are thinking.

What if I had an online checkbook (either at the bank or elsewhere)?
I could text to my checkbook the payment I just made. If the site was
separate from my bank, they could talk regularly.

What if my phone also had location? A local application might be able
to tag that input as groceries.

What if my bill payment service was tied into the bank account, and
had a projected balance? I could be alerted whenever a transaction
occurred that dropped me below some minimum.

What if I could actually make payments with the phone directly, to a
person or a retail location? What if coupons were included? (okay,
this steps out of mobile banking)

What if I had a money widget or application on my phone, and
interfaced with the bank through some unified experience?

What if a user + bank wanted extra security when shopping online
(phone or elsewhere), and required typing a three digit code generated
by the phone application (with a network call?) before the purchase
could be made?

Also, some people truly despise making phone calls. It definitely
runs in my family. I call the bank only if circumstances force me to.

All of this reinforces the idea that the mobile experience is
significantly more than a stripped down desktop experience.

Barbara Ballard
www.littlespringsdesign.com

20 Aug 2007 - 12:16am
Bharat Philiph-Patel
2007

Oliver,
Seems you have posed a very interesting set of questions to which we
could spend considerable time discussing based on the information we
have (limited - as it relates to the needs of the end user - your
personas and the overall strategy).

It seems to me that with mobile technology, tasks have to be very
well defined with minimal effort required to perform them (for
example, filling out a form to place an order would be a pain if the
user did not have the latest smartphone and was reduced to using
their key pad - leading to way too much time to enter data). This
leads to my question to you on your users's needs. If you were to
build the mobile friendly UI - what percentage of your users would
use it and how much time would they really spend to perform the
tasks. The third question then goes to the complexity of the tasks
or actions one would want to perform on a mobile device with limited
realestate and low support of common frameworks available in a
standard computer based browser that give the user tactile and
immediate feedback.

My other suggestion is to stick to web standards in any web
development effort regardless of the delivery platform. Sticking to
these standards will get you much closer to a well behaved website on
a given delivered device than without using these standards.
http://www.webstandards.org

In your design document, focus on the tasks that must be performed
with the expected user experience rather than the delivery method
implementation. Leave that to the developers and police the user
experience.

Just my 2 cents

Bharat

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

20 Aug 2007 - 2:53pm
oliver green
2006

>>Are you needing to consider design for >>telephone-based
applications (voice or DTMF, not >>mobile web)?

We are looking at a scenario which is a combination on both on the
mobile phone.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19220

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