Survey: Sci-Fi and Interface Design

7 Aug 2007 - 4:49pm
7 years ago
8 replies
1082 reads
Chris Noessel
2005

Hi, IxDA-ers. I am currently writing a book with Nathan Shedroff regarding
sci-fi's influence on interface design (and design's influence on sci-fi). The
work will include critical analyses of popular and influential properties,
references to prior works on the topics, tracing of interface concepts across
various sci-fi properties, views of practitioners from both the CHI and
film industries, and lessons learned from science fiction that are applicable to
interface design.To that end, we invite the members of the IxD mailing list
to participate in the following survey. Answer as much or as little as you like.
Note that we have deliberately constrained ourselves to the (mostly) visual
mediums of television and cinema.

1. Do you consider yourself a sci-fi fan? If so, what are
your favorite movies or programs and why? If not, why not? 2. What are your favorite interfaces from science fiction
films and television or your favorite interface moments?

3. What are some of your other sources of inspiration for
your work? Has there been a particular technology or designer you found
influential? If so, tell us about it.

4. Have you ever been inspired in your interface design by a
particular scene or a technology from science fiction? If so, what science
fiction was it? How did it influence your work? Did you share the source of
your inspiration with colleagues or clients?

5. Have you ever gleaned practical lessons about interaction
design from science fiction? If so, what was it?6. How do you respond to bad interface design in science
fiction? Are there any particularly bad interfaces you can recall from science
fiction? If so, what are they and what made them so bad?7. Have you ever chosen to purchase a particular device,
piece of software, or electronic device because it reminded you of something
you'd seen in sci-fi before? If so, tell us about it.8. We will be reporting most of the results from the survey in
aggregate. If we would like to include some of your direct responses, how
should we credit you? (For example, by full name or by email address? Is there
a company name we can include?)

Please DO NOT reply to the ixda list, as that'll make a lot of noise that will upset list members. INSTEAD, email completed surveys to: ixda.100.makeitso@ neverbox.com.

The book is currently planned for publication in Spring of
2008. The earlier we receive responses the better a chance there will be that
your responses will be read and included in the survey.Thanks for your
time and shared interest!

_________________________________________________________________
See what you’re getting into…before you go there
http://newlivehotmail.com/?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_migration_HM_viral_preview_0507

Comments

7 Aug 2007 - 6:07pm
Jeff Axup
2006

Chris,

A very interesting topic! I will fill out the questionnaire, but why are you
focusing on film and theatre? By far in my opinion, the best work in the
cyberpunk field is in book form. For example, if you want to trace the
design of many current technologies such as the Internet, or immersive
interfaces (such as Second Life) you need to go back to the early works of
Gibson, Sterling, and Stephenson to see how these well read classics likely
shaped what was actually built. While film sci-fi has created some
interesting prototypes (e.g. the Island, Minority Report) of concepts, they
usually don't have the depth to them that the books had already fleshed out
much earlier.

-Jeff

On 8/7/07, Chris Noessel <chrisnoessel at hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> Hi, IxDA-ers. I am currently writing a book with Nathan Shedroff regarding
> sci-fi's influence on interface design (and design's influence on sci-fi).
> The
> work will include critical analyses of popular and influential properties,
> references to prior works on the topics, tracing of interface concepts
> across
> various sci-fi properties, views of practitioners from both the CHI and
> film industries, and lessons learned from science fiction that are
> applicable to
> interface design.To that end, we invite the members of the IxD mailing
> list
> to participate in the following survey. Answer as much or as little as you
> like.
> Note that we have deliberately constrained ourselves to the (mostly)
> visual
> mediums of television and cinema.
>
>
>
> 1. Do you consider yourself a sci-fi fan? If so, what are
> your favorite movies or programs and why? If not, why not? 2. What are
> your favorite interfaces from science fiction
> films and television or your favorite interface moments?
>
>
>
>
>
> 3. What are some of your other sources of inspiration for
> your work? Has there been a particular technology or designer you found
> influential? If so, tell us about it.
>
> 4. Have you ever been inspired in your interface design by a
> particular scene or a technology from science fiction? If so, what science
> fiction was it? How did it influence your work? Did you share the source
> of
> your inspiration with colleagues or clients?
>
>
>
> 5. Have you ever gleaned practical lessons about interaction
> design from science fiction? If so, what was it?6. How do you respond to
> bad interface design in science
> fiction? Are there any particularly bad interfaces you can recall from
> science
> fiction? If so, what are they and what made them so bad?7. Have you ever
> chosen to purchase a particular device,
> piece of software, or electronic device because it reminded you of
> something
> you'd seen in sci-fi before? If so, tell us about it.8. We will be
> reporting most of the results from the survey in
> aggregate. If we would like to include some of your direct responses, how
> should we credit you? (For example, by full name or by email address? Is
> there
> a company name we can include?)
>
> Please DO NOT reply to the ixda list, as that'll make a lot of noise that
> will upset list members. INSTEAD, email completed surveys to:
> ixda.100.makeitso@ neverbox.com.
>
> The book is currently planned for publication in Spring of
> 2008. The earlier we receive responses the better a chance there will be
> that
> your responses will be read and included in the survey.Thanks for your
> time and shared interest!
>
>
>
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> See what you're getting into…before you go there
> http://newlivehotmail.com/?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_migration_HM_viral_preview_0507
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
Thanks,
Jeff
____________________________________________________________________________
Jeff Axup, Ph.D.
Principal Consultant, Mobile Community Design Consulting, San Diego

Research: Mobile Group Research Methods, Social Networks, Group Usability
E-mail: axup <at> userdesign.com
Blog: http://mobilecommunitydesign.com
Moblog: http://memeaddict.blogspot.com
____________________________________________________________________________

7 Aug 2007 - 9:47pm
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

Hello!

I too think you've handicapped yourself greatly by deliberately
choosing the film and TV mediums.

With a few exceptions like _2001_a_Space_Odyssey_ and the Japanese
anime TV series _Planetes_ science fiction films and TV lag about 20 or
40 years behind what's going on in interface work in the labs.

TV and film producers and (for the most part) TV and film scriptwriters
aren't the kind who are interested in Science and in cutting edge
technology. They get distracted by gadgets sometimes but they can't
make the connection to Science. They don't know a thing about Science
and, most importantly they don't want to know a thing about it.

On the other side of the fence, in those pro labs where scientists
study interfaces and human inteaction by first reading everything
that's been done, and then looking at life and technology, people have
obviously nothing to learn by looking at brain-dead movies.

Look at SF books! Look at SF short stories!

Alain Vaillancourt

Découvrez ce qui fait jaser les gens ! Visitez les groupes de l'heure sur Yahoo! Québec Groupes.
http://cf.groups.yahoo.com/

8 Aug 2007 - 1:01am
cfmdesigns
2004

On Aug 7, 2007, at 8:47 PM, Alain D. M. G. Vaillancourt wrote:

> On the other side of the fence, in those pro labs where scientists
> study interfaces and human inteaction by first reading everything
> that's been done, and then looking at life and technology, people have
> obviously nothing to learn by looking at brain-dead movies.
>
> Look at SF books! Look at SF short stories!

Look at SF comic books!

For example, the Legion of Super-Heroes commonly featured a hand-held
journal/web browser/computer device called an Omnicom in use by the
general public from about 1989 to 2003. This iPhone thing is
nothing new.

http://adventure247.blogspot.com/2007/06/iphone-is-iomnicom.html

-- Jim Drew
cfmdesigns at earthlink.net
http://www.soundskinky.com/blog/

7 Aug 2007 - 10:09pm
Chris Noessel
2005

Hey Alain. It's a good point and one which I and Nathan have discussed
at length. (He and I are both printed fiction fans.) But when tracing
the idea of influence, directness and popularity are important factors.
Authors often only address the cause and effect of the technologies
they describe, being vague or omitting the details of the interfaces
(which interactions, what controls where), which visual media are
forced to address as they build their props. Additionally, print sci-fi
does not have as wide a following as TV and movies, so it does not
affect mass purchasing decisions as greatly. Thus, we chose to
constrain ourselves to those media which are likely to have the greater
influence.

Point well taken, though. This was not a decision made lightly.> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 23:47:53 -0400> From: ndgmtlcd at yahoo.com> Subject: RE : [IxDA Discuss] Survey: Sci-Fi and Interface Design> To: chrisnoessel at hotmail.com; discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com> > Hello!> > I too think you've handicapped yourself greatly by deliberately> choosing the film and TV mediums. > > With a few exceptions like _2001_a_Space_Odyssey_ and the Japanese> anime TV series _Planetes_ science fiction films and TV lag about 20 or> 40 years behind what's going on in interface work in the labs.> > TV and film producers and (for the most part) TV and film scriptwriters> aren't the kind who are interested in Science and in cutting edge> technology. They get distracted by gadgets sometimes but they can't> make the connection to Science. They don't know a thing about Science> and, most importantly they don't want to know a thing about it.> > On the other side of the fence, in those pro labs where scientists> study interfaces and human inteaction by first reading everything> that's been done, and then looking at life and technology, people have> obviously nothing to learn by looking at brain-dead movies.> > Look at SF books! Look at SF short stories!> > Alain Vaillancourt> > > > > Découvrez ce qui fait jaser les gens ! Visitez les groupes de l'heure sur Yahoo! Québec Groupes.> http://cf.groups.yahoo.com/
_________________________________________________________________
Messenger Café — open for fun 24/7. Hot games, cool activities served daily. Visit now.
http://cafemessenger.com?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_AugWLtagline

8 Aug 2007 - 6:21am
Minkó Misi
2007

Hi!
It's really a great idea to write a book like this... :) I hope you
won't forget the coffee machine from Spaceballs...
Good luck with it!

Misi

Chris Noessel írta:
> Hey Alain. It's a good point and one which I and Nathan have discussed
> at length. (He and I are both printed fiction fans.) But when tracing
> the idea of influence, directness and popularity are important factors.
> Authors often only address the cause and effect of the technologies
> they describe, being vague or omitting the details of the interfaces
> (which interactions, what controls where), which visual media are
> forced to address as they build their props. Additionally, print sci-fi
> does not have as wide a following as TV and movies, so it does not
> affect mass purchasing decisions as greatly. Thus, we chose to
> constrain ourselves to those media which are likely to have the greater
> influence.
>
> Point well taken, though. This was not a decision made lightly.> Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 23:47:53 -0400> From: ndgmtlcd at yahoo.com> Subject: RE : [IxDA Discuss] Survey: Sci-Fi and Interface Design> To: chrisnoessel at hotmail.com; discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com> > Hello!> > I too think you've handicapped yourself greatly by deliberately> choosing the film and TV mediums. > > With a few exceptions like _2001_a_Space_Odyssey_ and the Japanese> anime TV series _Planetes_ science fiction films and TV lag about 20 or> 40 years behind what's going on in interface work in the labs.> > TV and film producers and (for the most part) TV and film scriptwriters> aren't the kind who are interested in Science and in cutting edge> technology. They get distracted by gadgets sometimes but they can't> make the connection to Science. They don't know a thing about Science> and, most importantly they don't want to know a thing about it.> > On the other side of the fence, in those pro labs where scientists> study interfaces and human inteaction by first reading everything> that's been done, and then looking at life and technology, people have> obviously nothing to learn by looking at brain-dead movies.> > Look at SF books! Look at SF short stories!> > Alain Vaillancourt> > > > > Découvrez ce qui fait jaser les gens ! Visitez les groupes de l'heure sur Yahoo! Québec Groupes.> http://cf.groups.yahoo.com/
> _________________________________________________________________
> Messenger Café — open for fun 24/7. Hot games, cool activities served daily. Visit now.
> http://cafemessenger.com?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_AugWLtagline
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>
>
>

27 Sep 2007 - 3:20pm
Anton Gordon
2007

Hey. This is a great topic to be exploring. I\'m going to be touching on it in a dissertation for university, but i was thinking, what kind of interfaces are you looking at? Graphic User Interfaces, or more physical interfaces? Or both??

28 Sep 2007 - 11:49am
Chris Noessel
2005

We're trying to keep an eye our for both physical and digital/GUI
interfaces as we develop our survey, keeping as broad a definition of
"interface" as we can. (Maybe it's my Texas upbringing, but I think
of horse tack, i.e. saddle, bridle, and reins, as the paradigm of
interface, which is unquestionably physical.)

I'll use this opportunity to encourage anyone who intended to answer
our original survey but let it slip off the back burner. Our initial
presentation of our material will be in about a month, and the more
input the better.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=19045

28 Sep 2007 - 12:24pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Chris:
there's a link<http://w5.cs.uni-sb.de/%7Ebutz/teaching/ie-ss03/papers/HCIinSF/>you
may interested in:

Abstract

Science Fiction movies have been a source for speculation about the future
of technology and human computer interaction. This paper presents a survey
of different kinds of interaction designs in movies during the past decades
and relates the techniques of the films to existing technologies and
prototypes where possible. The interactions will be categorized with respect
to their domain of real-life applications and also evaluated in regard to
results of current research in human computer interaction.
Cheers

-- Jarod

On 8/8/07, Chris Noessel <chrisnoessel at hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> Hi, IxDA-ers. I am currently writing a book with Nathan Shedroff regarding
> sci-fi's influence on interface design (and design's influence on sci-fi).
> The
> work will include critical analyses of popular and influential properties,
> references to prior works on the topics, tracing of interface concepts
> across
> various sci-fi properties, views of practitioners from both the CHI and
> film industries, and lessons learned from science fiction that are
> applicable to
> interface design.To that end, we invite the members of the IxD mailing
> list
> to participate in the following survey. Answer as much or as little as you
> like.
> Note that we have deliberately constrained ourselves to the (mostly)
> visual
> mediums of television and cinema.
>
>
>
> 1. Do you consider yourself a sci-fi fan? If so, what are
> your favorite movies or programs and why? If not, why not? 2. What are
> your favorite interfaces from science fiction
> films and television or your favorite interface moments?
>
>
>
>
>
> 3. What are some of your other sources of inspiration for
> your work? Has there been a particular technology or designer you found
> influential? If so, tell us about it.
>
> 4. Have you ever been inspired in your interface design by a
> particular scene or a technology from science fiction? If so, what science
> fiction was it? How did it influence your work? Did you share the source
> of
> your inspiration with colleagues or clients?
>
>
>
> 5. Have you ever gleaned practical lessons about interaction
> design from science fiction? If so, what was it?6. How do you respond to
> bad interface design in science
> fiction? Are there any particularly bad interfaces you can recall from
> science
> fiction? If so, what are they and what made them so bad?7. Have you ever
> chosen to purchase a particular device,
> piece of software, or electronic device because it reminded you of
> something
> you'd seen in sci-fi before? If so, tell us about it.8. We will be
> reporting most of the results from the survey in
> aggregate. If we would like to include some of your direct responses, how
> should we credit you? (For example, by full name or by email address? Is
> there
> a company name we can include?)
>
> Please DO NOT reply to the ixda list, as that'll make a lot of noise that
> will upset list members. INSTEAD, email completed surveys to:
> ixda.100.makeitso@ neverbox.com.
>
> The book is currently planned for publication in Spring of
> 2008. The earlier we receive responses the better a chance there will be
> that
> your responses will be read and included in the survey.Thanks for your
> time and shared interest!
>
>
>
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> See what you're getting into…before you go there
> http://newlivehotmail.com/?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_migration_HM_viral_preview_0507
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

--
IxD for better life style.

http://jarodtang.blogspot.com

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