IxD design spaces

8 Jul 2004 - 10:00am
10 years ago
11 replies
545 reads
Robert Reimann
2003

Skipped content of type multipart/alternative

Comments

8 Jul 2004 - 10:22am
Dave Malouf
2005

I don't know if this is ideal but i loved it when i saw it ...

I saw this studio setting that had a mix of cubes to war room.
Picture this ... you have a set of cubes all interconnected around a common
area.
The cubes have their own ability to close themselves off from that common
area, but they can all open up easily to it.
this way you get the flow of collaborative energy that you need from time
to time and easy assembly of peers, but you also get that space where you
can just gel and focus ... play music, and just be w/ the pixels so to
speak.

What i would add to this space are war rooms for each project team where
they can post and know that it won't be taken down or erased. And a general
"play" area where people can Find inspiration, let loose bent up energy,
etc.

Last thing ... Wi-Fi is killer important. Being mobile easily is important
and telecommuting should be encouraged. some people just need time away from
the office. Wi-Fi in urban settings is doubly important b/c of the hotSpots.
Like if i could go to Bryant Sq. park (around the corner from my job) and
work there, that would be really great. Being w/ people is always
inspirational b/c you can observe interactions live. Even interactions that
are not directly related to your specific end-product can illicit innovation
towards your end goals.

-- dave

_____

From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Reimann, Robert
Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 11:01 AM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces

Hi All,

I'd like to start a new discussion topic:

What sorts of design spaces have you found work well for
interaction design and designers, and why? What kinds of
space do you practice design in? Open studios? Individual offices
with closable doors? Project war rooms? Cubicles? What seems to work
best? What would be the ideal design space for our kind of work?
How would you best make use of the space to serve design needs?

Robert.
---

Robert Reimann
Manager, User Interface Design
Bose Design Center

Bose Corporation
The Mountain
Framingham, MA 01701

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8 Jul 2004 - 10:42am
Todd Warfel
2003

For us, proper IxD design spaces include a healthy mix of:
* lots of wall space that allows for taping things up (e.g. mood
boards, wireframes, visual comps, inspiration)
* whiteboards - needed for rapid prototyping out ui/ia metaphors and
ideas
* something to sit on (e.g. bean bag chairs, stools) - nothing fancy
needed, low profile and low tech is fine
* supply of paper, pens, pencils, markers, tape, scissors, post-its
* some toys and stuff to fidget w/ (e.g. silly putty, play-do, legos,
magic 8 ball)
* way to play music - could be an amp + speakers to plug the notebook
into and play via iTunes
* Wi-Fi

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

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8 Jul 2004 - 11:03am
Beth Osnato
2004

To David and Todd's lists, both of which I agree with entirely, I would add
a quiet room. Even with headphones, a cube is not always the best place to
think. Having a spot where people can go and close the door and be *silent*
is also important.

Beth Osnato | Information Architect
WeightWatchers.com
bosnato at weightwatchers.com <mailto:bosnato at weightwatchers.com>

-----Original Message-----
From: Todd R.Warfel [mailto:lists at mk27.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 11:43 AM
To: Interaction Designers
Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces

For us, proper IxD design spaces include a healthy mix of:

* lots of wall space that allows for taping things up (e.g. mood boards,
wireframes, visual comps, inspiration)

* whiteboards - needed for rapid prototyping out ui/ia metaphors and ideas

* something to sit on (e.g. bean bag chairs, stools) - nothing fancy needed,
low profile and low tech is fine

* supply of paper, pens, pencils, markers, tape, scissors, post-its

* some toys and stuff to fidget w/ (e.g. silly putty, play-do, legos, magic
8 ball)

* way to play music - could be an amp + speakers to plug the notebook into
and play via iTunes

* Wi-Fi

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel

User Experience Architect

MessageFirst | making products easier to use

--------------------------------------

Contact Info

voice: (607) 339-9640

email: twarfel at messagefirst.com

web: www.messagefirst.com

aim: twarfel at mac.com

--------------------------------------

In theory, theory and practice are the same.

In practice, they are not.

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8 Jul 2004 - 12:15pm
vutpakdi
2003

What we have: good sized individual offices and plenty of conference rooms
equipped with Smart Boards. Wireless access throughout the building.

What I'd like to have: good sized offices surrounding a common work /
artifact / meeting area + plenty of conference rooms with Smart Boards.
Wireless access throughout the building.

While being in a warroom or cube environment does help communication, being
able to close my office door if I want to concentrate really helps when I
need to be focussed.

I'd also like to have a few areas nearby (a park, a bookstore with a cafe,
a cafe/coffee shop) that I can walk to and then do some offsite create
brainstorming/sketching.

Ron

=====
============================================================================
Ron Vutpakdi
vutpakdi at acm.org

8 Jul 2004 - 4:05pm
Becubed
2004

On 8-Jul-04, at 11:00 AM, Reimann, Robert wrote:
> What sorts of design spaces have you found work well for
> interaction design and designers, and why?

I must complement the BBCi's homepage redesign team at Bush House in
London for their creative and effective use of space, which I had the
opportunity to see during a visit last year (Damian, are you lurking
out there?). It's a friendly twist on the "war room" concept.

Just in front of the elevators on the team's floor in Bush House is a
large glass wall that separates the corridor from the workspace. The
redesign team used this wall as a giant, living billboard for their
project, to these ends:

- It kept the rest of the organization aware of what was underway. You
couldn't help but gravitate towards the wall upon exiting the elevator.

- It provided an open forum for feedback and ideas. The team encouraged
everyone at BBCi to interact with the wall by contributing new items or
leaving their comments.

The wall (and the project) were a success, based on what I was told. It
even inspired them to publish a really engaging book that described the
whole process, called "The Glass Wall: The Homepage Redesign 2002".
Great job, folks!

---

BTW, the whole "war room" metaphor reminds me of a thought we sometimes
share with clients at Quarry:

** Products make war with competitors. Brands make love with customers.
**

Cheesy, perhaps. And anyone who's disenchanted with brand might find it
makes them choke (though that's another issue entirely) . . . But
there's no denying how prevalent war language is in business: "target"
your customers; "battle" for market share. I've observed that
organizations with a "making love" mindset are more apt to embrace user
experience design. Companies "at war" with competitors seem to feel
that features are the primary ammunition: More features! Bigger
features! Arrrgh!

--
Robert Barlow-Busch
Interaction Design Group
Quarry Integrated Communications Inc.
rbarlowbusch at quarry.com
(519) 570-2020

This e-mail message (including any attachments) is intended only for
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message immediately.

9 Jul 2004 - 8:29am
pabini
2004

MessageHi Dave

When I worked in the Mac Division of Ashton-Tate years ago, we had a layout very much like this. Each project had a "pod" of private and 2-person offices grouped around a large common room with couches and whiteboards and toys. Each 2-person office contained 2 cubes, so there was quite a bit of privacy. Plus, there was a private conference room with whiteboards all around. I've never liked the term "war room", but some people called it that. The room and the whiteboards were dedicated to the project.

That was the best office environment I've ever experienced. There was plenty of opportunity for collaboration, but also quiet spaces for concentrated work by individuals.

One of the best things about this was the cross-functional project grouping. A project's engineers, QA engineers, UI designers, tech writers, and product managers were all together in the pod.

Pabini
________________________________________

Pabini Gabriel-Petit
Principal & User Experience Architect
Spirit Softworks
www.spiritsoftworks.com
----- Original Message -----
From: David Heller
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 8:22 AM
Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces

I don't know if this is ideal but i loved it when i saw it ...

I saw this studio setting that had a mix of cubes to war room.
Picture this ... you have a set of cubes all interconnected around a common area.
The cubes have their own ability to close themselves off from that common area, but they can all open up easily to it.
this way you get the flow of collaborative energy that you need from time to time and easy assembly of peers, but you also get that space where you can just gel and focus ... play music, and just be w/ the pixels so to speak.

What i would add to this space are war rooms for each project team where they can post and know that it won't be taken down or erased. And a general "play" area where people can Find inspiration, let loose bent up energy, etc.

Last thing ... Wi-Fi is killer important. Being mobile easily is important and telecommuting should be encouraged. some people just need time away from the office. Wi-Fi in urban settings is doubly important b/c of the hotSpots. Like if i could go to Bryant Sq. park (around the corner from my job) and work there, that would be really great. Being w/ people is always inspirational b/c you can observe interactions live. Even interactions that are not directly related to your specific end-product can illicit innovation towards your end goals.

-- dave

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Reimann, Robert
Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 11:01 AM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces

Hi All,

I'd like to start a new discussion topic:

What sorts of design spaces have you found work well for
interaction design and designers, and why? What kinds of
space do you practice design in? Open studios? Individual offices
with closable doors? Project war rooms? Cubicles? What seems to work
best? What would be the ideal design space for our kind of work?
How would you best make use of the space to serve design needs?

Robert.
---

Robert Reimann
Manager, User Interface Design
Bose Design Center

Bose Corporation
The Mountain
Framingham, MA 01701

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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9 Jul 2004 - 12:49pm
Beth Osnato
2004

Pabini has hit on a key without which all the private/collaborative space
and whiteboards in the world won't help:

One of the best things about this was the cross-functional project grouping.
A project's engineers, QA engineers, UI designers, tech writers, and product
managers were all together in the pod.

Amen.

-----Original Message-----
From: Pabini Gabriel-Petit [mailto:pabini at earthlink.net]
Sent: Friday, July 09, 2004 9:29 AM
To: David Heller; discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces

Hi Dave

When I worked in the Mac Division of Ashton-Tate years ago, we had a layout
very much like this. Each project had a "pod" of private and 2-person
offices grouped around a large common room with couches and whiteboards and
toys. Each 2-person office contained 2 cubes, so there was quite a bit of
privacy. Plus, there was a private conference room with whiteboards all
around. I've never liked the term "war room", but some people called it
that. The room and the whiteboards were dedicated to the project.

That was the best office environment I've ever experienced. There was plenty
of opportunity for collaboration, but also quiet spaces for concentrated
work by individuals.

One of the best things about this was the cross-functional project grouping.
A project's engineers, QA engineers, UI designers, tech writers, and product
managers were all together in the pod.

Pabini
________________________________________

Pabini Gabriel-Petit
Principal & User Experience Architect
Spirit Softworks
www.spiritsoftworks.com <http://www.spiritsoftworks.com>

----- Original Message -----
From: David Heller <mailto:dave at interactiondesigners.com>
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
<mailto:discuss at interactiondesigners.com>
Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 8:22 AM
Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces

I don't know if this is ideal but i loved it when i saw it ...

I saw this studio setting that had a mix of cubes to war room.
Picture this ... you have a set of cubes all interconnected around a common
area.
The cubes have their own ability to close themselves off from that common
area, but they can all open up easily to it.
this way you get the flow of collaborative energy that you need from time
to time and easy assembly of peers, but you also get that space where you
can just gel and focus ... play music, and just be w/ the pixels so to
speak.

What i would add to this space are war rooms for each project team where
they can post and know that it won't be taken down or erased. And a general
"play" area where people can Find inspiration, let loose bent up energy,
etc.

Last thing ... Wi-Fi is killer important. Being mobile easily is important
and telecommuting should be encouraged. some people just need time away from
the office. Wi-Fi in urban settings is doubly important b/c of the hotSpots.
Like if i could go to Bryant Sq. park (around the corner from my job) and
work there, that would be really great. Being w/ people is always
inspirational b/c you can observe interactions live. Even interactions that
are not directly related to your specific end-product can illicit innovation
towards your end goals.

-- dave

_____

From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Reimann, Robert
Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 11:01 AM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces

Hi All,

I'd like to start a new discussion topic:

What sorts of design spaces have you found work well for
interaction design and designers, and why? What kinds of
space do you practice design in? Open studios? Individual offices
with closable doors? Project war rooms? Cubicles? What seems to work
best? What would be the ideal design space for our kind of work?
How would you best make use of the space to serve design needs?

Robert.
---

Robert Reimann
Manager, User Interface Design
Bose Design Center

Bose Corporation
The Mountain
Framingham, MA 01701

_____

_______________________________________________
Interaction Design Discussion List
discuss at interactiondesigners.com
--
to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com
--
Questions: lists at interactiondesigners.com
--
Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements already)
http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/
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9 Jul 2004 - 3:51pm
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

In the domain of office layout planing this is sometimes called a "cave
and commons" approach.

Do a search on the exact term to find out more.

Alain Vaillancourt

--- Beth Osnato <bosnato at weightwatchers.com> a écrit : > Pabini has hit
on a key without which all the private/collaborative
> space
> and whiteboards in the world won't help:
>
>
> One of the best things about this was the cross-functional project
> grouping.
> A project's engineers, QA engineers, UI designers, tech writers, and
> product
> managers were all together in the pod.
>
> Amen.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Pabini Gabriel-Petit [mailto:pabini at earthlink.net]
> Sent: Friday, July 09, 2004 9:29 AM
> To: David Heller; discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces
>
>
> Hi Dave
>
> When I worked in the Mac Division of Ashton-Tate years ago, we had a
> layout
> very much like this. Each project had a "pod" of private and 2-person
> offices grouped around a large common room with couches and
> whiteboards and
> toys. Each 2-person office contained 2 cubes, so there was quite a
> bit of
> privacy. Plus, there was a private conference room with whiteboards
> all
> around. I've never liked the term "war room", but some people called
> it
> that. The room and the whiteboards were dedicated to the project.
>
> That was the best office environment I've ever experienced. There was
> plenty
> of opportunity for collaboration, but also quiet spaces for
> concentrated
> work by individuals.
>
> One of the best things about this was the cross-functional project
> grouping.
> A project's engineers, QA engineers, UI designers, tech writers, and
> product
> managers were all together in the pod.
>
> Pabini
> ________________________________________
>
> Pabini Gabriel-Petit
> Principal & User Experience Architect
> Spirit Softworks
> www.spiritsoftworks.com <http://www.spiritsoftworks.com>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: David Heller <mailto:dave at interactiondesigners.com>
> To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> <mailto:discuss at interactiondesigners.com>
> Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 8:22 AM
> Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces
>
> I don't know if this is ideal but i loved it when i saw it ...
>
> I saw this studio setting that had a mix of cubes to war room.
> Picture this ... you have a set of cubes all interconnected around a
> common
> area.
> The cubes have their own ability to close themselves off from that
> common
> area, but they can all open up easily to it.
> this way you get the flow of collaborative energy that you need from
> time
> to time and easy assembly of peers, but you also get that space where
> you
> can just gel and focus ... play music, and just be w/ the pixels so
> to
> speak.
>
> What i would add to this space are war rooms for each project team
> where
> they can post and know that it won't be taken down or erased. And a
> general
> "play" area where people can Find inspiration, let loose bent up
> energy,
> etc.
>
> Last thing ... Wi-Fi is killer important. Being mobile easily is
> important
> and telecommuting should be encouraged. some people just need time
> away from
> the office. Wi-Fi in urban settings is doubly important b/c of the
> hotSpots.
> Like if i could go to Bryant Sq. park (around the corner from my job)
> and
> work there, that would be really great. Being w/ people is always
> inspirational b/c you can observe interactions live. Even
> interactions that
> are not directly related to your specific end-product can illicit
> innovation
> towards your end goals.
>
> -- dave
>
>
>
> _____
>
> From:
>
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
>
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
> com] On Behalf Of Reimann, Robert
> Sent: Thursday, July 08, 2004 11:01 AM
> To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD design spaces
>
>
> Hi All,
>
> I'd like to start a new discussion topic:
>
> What sorts of design spaces have you found work well for
> interaction design and designers, and why? What kinds of
> space do you practice design in? Open studios? Individual offices
> with closable doors? Project war rooms? Cubicles? What seems to work
> best? What would be the ideal design space for our kind of work?
> How would you best make use of the space to serve design needs?
>
> Robert.
> ---
>
> Robert Reimann
> Manager, User Interface Design
> Bose Design Center
>
>
> Bose Corporation
> The Mountain
> Framingham, MA 01701
>
>
>
> _____
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Questions: lists at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements
> already)
> http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/
> --
> http://interactiondesigners.com/
>
> > _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Questions: lists at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements
> already)
> http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/
> --
> http://interactiondesigners.com/

__________________________________________________________
Lèche-vitrine ou lèche-écran ?
magasinage.yahoo.ca

10 Jul 2004 - 2:38am
pabini
2004

Hi Alain

The architect who worked with Ashton-Tate called it "the pod concept", but I
like your term much better. :-)

Pabini

Alain Vaillancourt wrote:

> In the domain of office layout planing this is sometimes called a "cave
> and commons" approach.
>
> Do a search on the exact term to find out more.

26 Jul 2004 - 2:43pm
Christian Simon
2003

A little more about cool office space...
Steelcase has a reputation for getting it right. They have won awards for
their innovations. Herman Miller is another very well known competitor. I
personally like the Steelcase story.

The areas of innovations I am aware of include: Internal architectural ideas
for managing cabling, private and communal space. Another is their
innovative ideas for Mobile Furniture. The old cube concepts are focused on
structural issues. The new solutions are surprisingly light. Steelcase moved
the bar, so to speak, and created skeletal components for electronics and
moveable office elements so personnel can customize their areas.

[url=http://www.steelcase.com/images/full/photos/02-0002609PostAndBeam.jpg]
[url=http://www.steelcase.com/images/misc/photos/02-0002840PandB.jpg]

Christian

////////////////////christiansimon at pacbell.net\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

3 Aug 2004 - 3:03pm
Edo A. Elan
2004

I hesitated in posting this since I have commercial connection with
WorkClub. However, I believe this is relevant to the design spaces thread.

There's a place in Emeryville, CA that offers an interesting slant on the
issues of work spaces. The place is called Gate 3 WorkClub and basically it
rents space to members (freelancers and small companies) on a flexible
hourly/daily/monthly basis, but tries to be more than just a flexible lease.
The person who designed that space is a product designer - formerly with
Herman Miller furniture and Praxis - probably that's why part of the
services offered there is a fully equipped usability lab rental. Anyway,
this is how the working space is built.

The WorkClub is made up of a set of good sized open plan office "cubes"
(thought they're not cubed at all) for solo work, surrounded by various
spaces for collaborative work. The personal spaces are organized in various
zones differentiated by the degree of quiet and privacy required (up to
quiet soundproof rooms - they call "privacy booths"). Wireless access is all
around.

The "Teamwork Spaces" that are intended for collaborative work are on the
periphery of the main floor, and include traditional meeting rooms, large
conference room and team lounges with upholstered lounge chairs, high stools
and lots of whiteboards and market boards etc.

On the other floors there are common use areas like a cafe, "kitchen table",
areas with sofas and couches, even a roof garden (which is my favorite for
finding inspiration and reenergize). There's a library and massage room
being built.

The place is called WorkClub meaning it tries to bring the easygoing feeling
of a club or bookstore / cafe into your work space.

Their site: www.gate-3.com

(If anyone on this list is interested in a deal there for the usability lab
rental or else, let me know by email).

---
Edo Amin
eCustomerResearch.com/about.htm
eamin_at_eCustomerResearch.com
C 415.568.6770
T 415.738.0442

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