iPhone - review

30 Jun 2007 - 5:15am
7 years ago
23 replies
900 reads
jstrande
2007

I was going to respond yesterday to the "who is buying an iPhone"... but
decided to wait and just post an initial review...

I got one... sort of. I bought one for my wife. And trust me when I tell you
it is even cooler than the appears in the commercials. I was going to wait
for the next generation version to come out, but I might just go ahead and
get one.

There was no line at the AT&T store at 7AM yesterday morning when I stopped
at Starbucks for coffee (they're right next to each other) on my way to
work, so I decided I would check back at lunch. There was no line at lunch
time either, so I ran home to drop off my computer and went back. In that 30
minutes, a line of 6 people had formed.

So, at 12:30, I began my wait... and stupid me, I didn't bring a chair. DOH!
The people (mostly male, middle age folks) in line with me were really nice,
which certainly helped the time to pass more quickly... until about the last
1/2 hour, that seemed to take forever! :-)

When the time came, they let in the first 6 people in line, one for each of
the employees in the store. I was number 7 in line, so I had to wait a
little longer... but only about 5 minutes, til the first person came out.

I got my wife the 8 gig model, a couple of accessories and I was on my way
home.

I took out her laptop, downloaded and installed the new iTunes, and then got
forced to update MAC OS... which sucked.... I just wanted to get that phone
set up to play!

After 30 minutes of software downloads and installs, I had the iPhone in the
cradle and I was setting it up... the process was smooth, and we were done
in just minutes.

Copied over her music and contacts and finally got to start playing
around!!!

As I mentioned, the iPhone is incredibly cool... totally living up to the
hype. Here are some notes:

- The iPod functionality is awesome, cover flow is great, however, the
standard list is phenomenal as well. A little flick of the finger and you're
scrolling through gobs of music (I put about 4 gigs on there)

- Scrolling through a list, at first, seemed backwards. I wanted to run my
finger down the screen to get to the bottom of the list - just like you
"scroll" down using a scroll bar, but it is the more natural gesture of
flicking up to move the unwanted stuff out of your way.

- Setting up Wi-Fi took literally 2 seconds: I opened the mail application
and was prompted for our WPA key, entered it, and boom. Connected.

- I set up the local weather in about 1/2 second... simply by entering our
zip code. There was almost no latency in getting the updated 5-day forecast
for our city. It took me only a second or two to figure out how to delete
the default cities weather forecast. Simply touching a red circle next to
the city name revealed a delete button... very smooth.

- Navigating the maps was incredibly cool. Starting with two fingers
together on the screen, just slide them away from each other in whatever
direction you want the map magnified. I was able to drill into our city in a
matter of a couple of gestures.

- There are no "close" icons or buttons, you just return to the main screen
with the main navigation button on the device.

- I changed a couple of the default settings, which were quick and easy to
do.

- The keyboard, which might take some getting used to, is very cool. The
visual feedback when you press a letter or number is great - although, when
you are entering a password and can't see the text you've entered, the
visual indicators of the letters you've typed should stay visible for a
little longer.

- One of the coolest things is a little ".com" keyboard button. You type in
a URL in the browser and click one button to complete the address... that is
wicked cool.

- I have my iTunes set to manually sync with my iPod, a feature I couldn't
seem to find or accomplish with the iPhone. I'm going to have to investigate
this one a little more. There was an option to only sync checked items or
only sync certain playlists, so that might be the way to do it.

There are so many little things that make the iPhone praiseworthy... the
whole time I was playing last night, a line just kept running through my
head: touching is believing.
It is evident that they spent time truly understanding the main tasks people
need to complete with a mobile device. The buttons for the main tasks are
big and obvious... my wife kept remarking that they built it for someone who
hates technology, like her.

This is also posted on my blog...
http://jstrande.typepad.com/blog/2007/06/iphone.html

Jon

Comments

30 Jun 2007 - 12:17pm
Josh
2006

Jon hit the nail on the head with that last email.

Some coworkers waited in line at the 5th Avenue Apple store starting at
about 10:30am yesterday, and they were kind enough to pick up an 8gig for me
(I hope to have it completely replace my Nano).

My setup took about 5 minutes excluding the time it took to install the
iTunes and OS updates. I opted to get a new phone number instead of
transferring my old number. Two friends (the guys who waited in line)
attempted to transfer numbers and are still waiting. It looks like the AT&T
folks are completely swamped.

Things to note so far:
- The headphone jack is deeper than normal and it means I need an adapter to
use my favorite earbuds.
- It doesn't look like manual syncing is possible. I couldn't find the
setting, and all of the instructions suggest creating an iPhone playlist and
manually managing that.
- The no "close" icon/feature definitely caught my attention
- Settings and setup are extremely easy to manage, and Wifi was easier to
set up than on my laptop.

--
Josh Viney
EastMedia Group
http://www.eastmedia.com

2 Jul 2007 - 7:14am
Todd Warfel
2003

83rd in line at the Apple store in KOP and I had two phones in hand
in about 20 minutes after the line started moving. Apple really had
their game on. Buy your phone(s), then continue through the store to
purchase accessories. That way they can get people their phones as
quickly as possible and move the line.

Initial impressions:
-> Activation was really quick. I had two phones activated with
numbers and working in under 10 minutes from the privacy of my own home.

-> Thinner than I expected. It's actually smaller than my 60GB and
80GB iPod videos. It's a little taller, but thinner.

-> The ads don't do the UI justice. It's really slick. Motion is
seamless. And the resolution is incredible.

-> The keyboard took about 2 minutes for me to get used to. Now I'm
flying along pretty quickly. I can't type as fast as I can on a
normal keyboard, but I can type a lot faster than I did on my Samsung
t589 series (slim candy bar phone). My wife is a Blackberry user and
it's taking her a little longer to get used to it - couple hours
probably.

-> A couple of clever things about the keyboard. Audio feedback. The
keys magnify as you move over them (you have to be on top of the
screen for this). And when you're surfing the web, there's no space
bar. You can't type spaces in URLs, so they just eliminate it and
instead give you a handy little .com button. Very clever - contextual
keyboard.

-> EDGE network isn't bad. It's no WiFi, but it's not bad. YouTube on
EDGE is lower quality than using the WiFi.

-> The wireless network mode is really clever. When it senses you're
near a WiFi spot, it comes up on screen and asks you if you want to
join it - just like a Mac. In the future, it just remembers that
network and when it's in range, it automatically hops over to that
instead of using EDGE for downloading email, stocks, Google Maps, or
surfing the Internet.

-> Syncing worked flawlessly. I manually selected a few playlists,
photo albums, and a list of people from my Address Book. It synced
them up in a few minutes (about 2GB worth).

-> One of the greatest things about Syncing and the iPhone - you can
unplug it anytime you want, even mid-sync. There's no "Ooops! You
disconnected a device..." message. It just knows. Finally.

-> Zooming in/out, panning, and scrolling take a bout 2 seconds to
learn. Scrolling is backwards from how you use a mouse, but way more
intuitive. You simply throw the screen into the direction you want to
move.

-> Google Maps is great on the phone as well. And getting directions
works well. I haven't tried the GPS out yet.

On the downside:
-> The screen shows fingerprints real bad. I'm going to get a
protective film for mine. They run $14.99 for two.

-> The battery life is good for about 2 days when you're getting
email, calling, texting, surfing YouTube, and the Web on the iPhone.
So, not bad, but not stellar either.

Things they need to fix, or do in upcoming models:
-> I want to be able to select the little WiFi/network icon in the
upper left corner of the screen to change networks. In every
neighborhood I'm in, there are a number of open networks. Typically I
just use my own, but...

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

2 Jul 2007 - 8:30am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Jul 2, 2007, at 8:14 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> -> Google Maps is great on the phone as well. And getting directions
> works well. I haven't tried the GPS out yet.

Uh, Todd, I hate to break it to you, but there is no GPS.

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

To design is much more than simply
to assemble, to order, or even to edit;
it is to add value and meaning,
to illuminate, to simplify, to clarify,
to modify, to dignify, to dramatize,
to persuade, and perhaps even to amuse.

- Paul Rand

2 Jul 2007 - 8:48am
Todd Warfel
2003

Yeah, it's more of a step by step directions. I had read that there
was GPS, but that was incorrect. It does Google maps w/directions,
but they're step by step.

On Jul 2, 2007, at 9:30 AM, Jack Moffett wrote:

>> -> Google Maps is great on the phone as well. And getting directions
>> works well. I haven't tried the GPS out yet.
>
> Uh, Todd, I hate to break it to you, but there is no GPS.
>
> Jack

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

2 Jul 2007 - 9:28am
treevivek
2007

49 things you may like to know about iphone.
Kindly see my post here
http://blog.i2fly.com/?p=407

I think apple have to think on why these restrictions even where web is enjoying the great interactive experiences of Flash and iphone doesnt support at all!!!

2 Jul 2007 - 9:19am
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Jul 2, 2007, at 9:48 AM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> Yeah, it's more of a step by step directions. I had read that there
> was GPS, but that was incorrect. It does Google maps w/directions,
> but they're step by step.

I've seen several references to this as a "poor man's GPS." That may
be where the confusion comes from.

Jared

2 Jul 2007 - 9:28am
Todd Warfel
2003

Perhaps. But the Google maps are pretty killer.

Funny thing happened yesterday while I was in Home Depot. A younger
employee was explaining YouTube to an older one. The older guy (50s)
was having a hard time understanding. So, I simply turned around,
pulled up YouTube and said, "Here, have a look." Then I walked back a
few feet and watched.

They started playing with it for a few seconds and then the younger
guy (20s) turned to me and said, "Is this the new iPhone?"

The interesting thing was that the younger guy wanted to be able to
use it for videos, music, and the internet. The older guy wanted to
use it for photos, music, reading news, and watching stocks. He asked
me like four times if I could get stocks on it. I showed him the
stock ticker - that was the killer app for him.

On Jul 2, 2007, at 10:19 AM, Jared M. Spool wrote:

> I've seen several references to this as a "poor man's GPS." That
> may be where the confusion comes from.
>
> Jared

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

2 Jul 2007 - 9:50am
Dave Malouf
2005

Google maps on iPhone works like the Java Version of google maps on
almost any other non GPS smartphone. What's funny is that if you
have a GPS then that same google maps works assuming a Location based
services system. That doesn't have to be GPS btw. There are other
mechanisms for LBS, but range in accurracy depending on the #'s and
types of cell towers that are around you.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=17804

2 Jul 2007 - 10:14am
.pauric
2006

I cant imagine it will be very long before there's a gps adapter for
the iPhone.

I'm curious about the usability driver behind the [.com] button when
entering the url.

There isnt a www. because it can be implied. I never enter .com on a
PC, I just hit ctrl-enter.

Wouldnt it have been more simple just to assume a single word should
be wrapped with www. - .com?

Not sure how you afford this to start off with, I feel a permanent
button is less than ideal... but there's a number of people
highlighting this as 'smart'

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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2 Jul 2007 - 10:36am
Todd Warfel
2003

For most of the domains I've just been typing in Smashingmagazine and
hitting to and it works. But I have played with the .com - of course
the one domain I did it w/was a .net domain. So, it didn't work that
well. But that's not very often.

On Jul 2, 2007, at 11:14 AM, pauric wrote:

> Wouldnt it have been more simple just to assume a single word should
> be wrapped with www. - .com?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

2 Jul 2007 - 10:35am
Paul Menard
2006

On Jul 2, 2007, at 10:14 AM, pauric wrote:

> Not sure how you afford this to start off with, I feel a permanent
> button is less than ideal... but there's a number of people
> highlighting this as 'smart'

I have to agree. Would have been nice to make this extension
changeable. I work work for a company whos domain extension is .net.
Which means all of our sites are .net. In this case the .com button
is useless. But if they had made the button so I change it to .net or
really anything I want would be cool.

One thing that I find difficult is there is no copy-paste
functionality (or at least I have not discovered it. For example I
have an email with the 26-character WEP key for my office WiFi. Would
have been nice to be able to copy-paste this into the field. But
instead had to hand write it on a sticky then reenter. The write to a
sticky is because there are too many steps to jump between the email
and wifi entry screens.

But still I think the iPhone is very innovative and glad I took off
early to stand in line for 2 hours. I know there are some stories
floating around about activation issues. Most of these are tied to
folks jumping from other providers mid-plan. My activation took less
than 12 hours.

P-

2 Jul 2007 - 10:50am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Jul 2, 2007, at 11:35 AM, Paul Menard wrote:

> One thing that I find difficult is there is no copy-paste
> functionality (or at least I have not discovered it.

That's correct. There is currently no way to copy and paste. They
have tried to remove the need for this in common use cases, such as
mailing someone a URL or photo, by including a specific button for
that particular action. Of course, this only covers a small number of
possibilities.

Leaving it out wasn't an oversight. Hopefully, they are working on a
more universal solution to its absence.

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

Things should be as simple as possible,
but no simpler.

- Albert Einstein

2 Jul 2007 - 11:24am
Manu Sharma
2003

David Malouf wrote:

> Google maps on iPhone works like the Java Version of google maps
> on almost any other non GPS smartphone.

Except that I read somewhere the iPhone version uses a pretty
sizable cache *pre-loaded* in the iPhone to give you a
near-instantaneous delivery.

Manu
New Delhi, India
http://orangehues.com/blog/

3 Jul 2007 - 5:52am
Won Sun Parque
2007

Has anyone found the following two iPhone input UI issues
troublesome?

1. When iPhone suggests a word to you while you type, to accept it,
you need to press the space bar, which I understand if someone wants
to just keep typing and keep their fingers on the keyboard area. But
to me, I keep having the urge to move my finger up to press the
suggested word itself to accept it. Kind of like. "Oh yeh, that's
the word I want.", and touch! But then, BOOM, the word is gone....
Turns out, if you touch the word that you want, it means cancel!

2. The keys [Enter] and [Backspace] are placed right next to each
other vertically. It happens a lot that when I want to press
[Backspace], I ended up hitting [Enter] instead. This is really
annoying when typing on a Web Form. Instead of correcting a mis-type
letter (Which happens A LOT using iPhone's keyboard), the entire Web
Form is submitted by the mis-typed [Enter] key.

I love my iPhone, don't get me wrong, but these two issues are
really annoying. :(

Won Sun Parque
Senior UI Deisnger
Akamai Technologies Inc.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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3 Jul 2007 - 8:34am
Håkan Reis
2006

Missing review: How about the phone? Most reviews focus on text input, web
browsing, syncing, music and video playing. What about the phone
functionality?

- How many taps to dial a number.
- How many taps to find a contact and select the number to call (if multiple
numbers for a contact)
- How easy to answer the phone?
- What happens when you surf or listen to music and a call is coming in.
- Is it easy to go from other functions to call a number?
- How easy to select a number in another application and call it
- etc.

You know, the *phone* functionality of the iPhone. I'm just curious!.

--

Håkan Reis
Dotway AB

My blog || http://blog.reis.se
My company || http://dotway.se
Our conference || http://oredev.org

On 7/3/07, Won Sun Parque <idmail at wonsun.com> wrote:
>
> Has anyone found the following two iPhone input UI issues
> troublesome?
>
> 1. When iPhone suggests a word to you while you type, to accept it,
> you need to press the space bar, which I understand if someone wants
> to just keep typing and keep their fingers on the keyboard area. But
> to me, I keep having the urge to move my finger up to press the
> suggested word itself to accept it. Kind of like. "Oh yeh, that's
> the word I want.", and touch! But then, BOOM, the word is gone....
> Turns out, if you touch the word that you want, it means cancel!
>
> 2. The keys [Enter] and [Backspace] are placed right next to each
> other vertically. It happens a lot that when I want to press
> [Backspace], I ended up hitting [Enter] instead. This is really
> annoying when typing on a Web Form. Instead of correcting a mis-type
> letter (Which happens A LOT using iPhone's keyboard), the entire Web
> Form is submitted by the mis-typed [Enter] key.
>
> I love my iPhone, don't get me wrong, but these two issues are
> really annoying. :(
>
>
> Won Sun Parque
> Senior UI Deisnger
> Akamai Technologies Inc.
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=17804
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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3 Jul 2007 - 10:30am
Josh
2006

At first I was a little confused by the suggested words and found myself
wanting to reach out and touch them. After a few sms' and a few emails, I
found that completely ignoring the suggested words and just typing was the
easiest/fastest thing to do. It takes trust, but seems to work out pretty
well.

Hakan asked:

- How many taps to dial a number.
1 or 2 taps to get to the dial pad depending on whether you were previously
on the dial pad when using the Phone or if you have to select dial pad,
dialing the number, and tapping "Call" button.

- How many taps to find a contact and select the number to call (if multiple
numbers for a contact)
If the phone is unlocked, it's possible to dial a number from your
addressbook or from a missed call in 2 taps. First tap to select Phone mode,
second to select the number/person you want to call. 2 or 3 taps and some
scrolling is more likely though.

- How easy to answer the phone?
It's pretty easy, although I do have to look at the phone.

- What happens when you surf or listen to music and a call is coming in.
Music pauses while you take the call then restarts when you finish the call.
The browser does pretty much the same thing because it can't download pages
on Edge at the same time you're on a call.

- Is it easy to go from other functions to call a number?
Easy as clicking the Home button then the Phone icon.

- How easy to select a number in another application and call it
I did notice phone number highlighting in SMS, not sure if clicking the
numbers calls them or adds them to addressbook. I haven't seen other
examples of similar yet, although in Google Maps when you search for a place
and tap to see more info about the place it will show you a phone number if
one is available and you can call it by tapping it. There isn't any copy and
paste functionality, so if the app doesn't recognize the string as a phone
number, there's no way to easily add it to addressbook.

--
Josh Viney
EastMedia Group
http://www.eastmedia.com

3 Jul 2007 - 3:20pm
Volker Gersabeck
2007

regarding this .com button i'm curious to see their solution for the non-us
version. Coming from Germany i tried the iPhone this saturday and the .com
button didn't help me in most cases. But there are still enough situations
where you even in Germany visit a .com site. So the configuration of this
button seems to be a good solution.

On 7/2/07, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com> wrote:
>
> For most of the domains I've just been typing in Smashingmagazine and
> hitting to and it works. But I have played with the .com - of course
> the one domain I did it w/was a .net domain. So, it didn't work that
> well. But that's not very often.
>
> On Jul 2, 2007, at 11:14 AM, pauric wrote:
>
> > Wouldnt it have been more simple just to assume a single word should
> > be wrapped with www. - .com?
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> President, Design & Usability Specialist
> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

3 Jul 2007 - 4:51pm
Todd Warfel
2003

On Jul 3, 2007, at 6:52 AM, Won Sun Parque wrote:

> But to me, I keep having the urge to move my finger up to press the
> suggested word itself to accept it. Kind of like. "Oh yeh, that's
> the word I want.", and touch! But then, BOOM, the word is gone....
> Turns out, if you touch the word that you want, it means cancel!

Yup, I kept doing this the first 3-4 times. After I figured out the
space bar suggestion/workaround, I stopped hitting the word that was
suggested with the X in the top corner. I still think that selecting
the word or hitting the space bar should do the same thing. From a
proximity standpoint and Fitz's law, the space bar is faster and more
efficient, but the my behavior and expectation was that clicking the
word that's showing up should fill it in.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

3 Jul 2007 - 8:07pm
Anonymous

* Looking at the interaction of things, if space bar didn't accept
the autocomplete, then users would have to move up to the word, every
time, to accept each correction. This would break the flow of typing.
* The x-in-a-circle, which is what the tip over the word shows, is
used pretty extensively across the iPhone's GUI to show deletion. It
would seem odd to not have it do the same here.
* If the x-in-a-circle was removed, then both space bar and tap-on-
the-word would do the same thing; duplicate functionality isn't
really a good thing on a mobile device where every pixel matters.
* If the space bar functionality was removed and only the tap-on-the-
word did it, then the delete functionality would be lost entirely and
there would be no way to cancel the autocomplete/correct aside from
another button or keystroke somewhere else on the screen, which would
be even further removed from the actual word itself. This way, it
stays inline with the text area being populated and is where your eye
is anyway.

I think they made the right call, myself.

On Jul 3, 2007, at 2:51 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

>
> On Jul 3, 2007, at 6:52 AM, Won Sun Parque wrote:
>
>> But to me, I keep having the urge to move my finger up to press the
>> suggested word itself to accept it. Kind of like. "Oh yeh, that's
>> the word I want.", and touch! But then, BOOM, the word is gone....
>> Turns out, if you touch the word that you want, it means cancel!
>
> Yup, I kept doing this the first 3-4 times. After I figured out the
> space bar suggestion/workaround, I stopped hitting the word that was
> suggested with the X in the top corner. I still think that selecting
> the word or hitting the space bar should do the same thing. From a
> proximity standpoint and Fitz's law, the space bar is faster and more
> efficient, but the my behavior and expectation was that clicking the
> word that's showing up should fill it in.
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> President, Design & Usability Specialist
> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
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_______________________________________________
Daniel Montiel
Information Architect

408.569.3607 : mob | torrentprime : aim

"Senator, when you took your oath of office, you placed your hand on
the Bible and swore to uphold the Constitution. You didn't place your
hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible."

4 Jul 2007 - 6:49pm
David Polinchock
2005

I just posted some of my initial reactions to the iPhone at
http://tinyurl.com/ywarx4 but I gotta' tell you, I had some pretty bad
battery life today. I only made 3 calls, none of them completed just so I
could show people what happened when you were doing something on the phone
and a call came in, I used e-mail, took photos and my daughter watched a few
hours of video and the battery was out by 7 PM. And I unplugged it this
morning about 10 AM. According to Apple, I should get 7 hours of straight
video playback and I didn't get any where near that! How have other people
been doing with battery life?

David

> From: "Daniel C. Montiel" <torrentprime at mac.com>
> Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2007 18:07:11 -0700
> To: <discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com>
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] iPhone - review
>
> * Looking at the interaction of things, if space bar didn't accept
> the autocomplete, then users would have to move up to the word, every
> time, to accept each correction. This would break the flow of typing.
> * The x-in-a-circle, which is what the tip over the word shows, is
> used pretty extensively across the iPhone's GUI to show deletion. It
> would seem odd to not have it do the same here.
> * If the x-in-a-circle was removed, then both space bar and tap-on-
> the-word would do the same thing; duplicate functionality isn't
> really a good thing on a mobile device where every pixel matters.
> * If the space bar functionality was removed and only the tap-on-the-
> word did it, then the delete functionality would be lost entirely and
> there would be no way to cancel the autocomplete/correct aside from
> another button or keystroke somewhere else on the screen, which would
> be even further removed from the actual word itself. This way, it
> stays inline with the text area being populated and is where your eye
> is anyway.
>
> I think they made the right call, myself.
>
>
> On Jul 3, 2007, at 2:51 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>
>>
>> On Jul 3, 2007, at 6:52 AM, Won Sun Parque wrote:
>>
>>> But to me, I keep having the urge to move my finger up to press the
>>> suggested word itself to accept it. Kind of like. "Oh yeh, that's
>>> the word I want.", and touch! But then, BOOM, the word is gone....
>>> Turns out, if you touch the word that you want, it means cancel!
>>
>> Yup, I kept doing this the first 3-4 times. After I figured out the
>> space bar suggestion/workaround, I stopped hitting the word that was
>> suggested with the X in the top corner. I still think that selecting
>> the word or hitting the space bar should do the same thing. From a
>> proximity standpoint and Fitz's law, the space bar is faster and more
>> efficient, but the my behavior and expectation was that clicking the
>> word that's showing up should fill it in.
>>
>> Cheers!
>>
>> Todd Zaki Warfel
>> President, Design & Usability Specialist
>> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
>> ----------------------------------
>> Contact Info
>> Voice: (215) 825-7423
>> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
>> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
>> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
>> ----------------------------------
>> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
>> In practice, they are not.
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
>> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>
> _______________________________________________
> Daniel Montiel
> Information Architect
>
> 408.569.3607 : mob | torrentprime : aim
>
> "Senator, when you took your oath of office, you placed your hand on
> the Bible and swore to uphold the Constitution. You didn't place your
> hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible."
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org

4 Jul 2007 - 8:34pm
Anonymous

This is my only real problem. Mine is the same way. I get less than
24 hours, and that's with no/little video playing at all.

Daniel

On Jul 4, 2007, at 4:49 PM, David Polinchock wrote:

> I just posted some of my initial reactions to the iPhone at
> http://tinyurl.com/ywarx4 but I gotta' tell you, I had some pretty bad
> battery life today. I only made 3 calls, none of them completed
> just so I
> could show people what happened when you were doing something on
> the phone
> and a call came in, I used e-mail, took photos and my daughter
> watched a few
> hours of video and the battery was out by 7 PM. And I unplugged it
> this
> morning about 10 AM. According to Apple, I should get 7 hours of
> straight
> video playback and I didn't get any where near that! How have
> other people
> been doing with battery life?
>
> David
>
>
>> From: "Daniel C. Montiel" <torrentprime at mac.com>
>> Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2007 18:07:11 -0700
>> To: <discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com>
>> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] iPhone - review
>>
>> * Looking at the interaction of things, if space bar didn't accept
>> the autocomplete, then users would have to move up to the word, every
>> time, to accept each correction. This would break the flow of
>> typing.
>> * The x-in-a-circle, which is what the tip over the word shows, is
>> used pretty extensively across the iPhone's GUI to show deletion. It
>> would seem odd to not have it do the same here.
>> * If the x-in-a-circle was removed, then both space bar and tap-on-
>> the-word would do the same thing; duplicate functionality isn't
>> really a good thing on a mobile device where every pixel matters.
>> * If the space bar functionality was removed and only the tap-on-
>> the-
>> word did it, then the delete functionality would be lost entirely and
>> there would be no way to cancel the autocomplete/correct aside from
>> another button or keystroke somewhere else on the screen, which would
>> be even further removed from the actual word itself. This way, it
>> stays inline with the text area being populated and is where your eye
>> is anyway.
>>
>> I think they made the right call, myself.
>>
>>
>> On Jul 3, 2007, at 2:51 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> On Jul 3, 2007, at 6:52 AM, Won Sun Parque wrote:
>>>
>>>> But to me, I keep having the urge to move my finger up to press the
>>>> suggested word itself to accept it. Kind of like. "Oh yeh, that's
>>>> the word I want.", and touch! But then, BOOM, the word is gone....
>>>> Turns out, if you touch the word that you want, it means cancel!
>>>
>>> Yup, I kept doing this the first 3-4 times. After I figured out the
>>> space bar suggestion/workaround, I stopped hitting the word that was
>>> suggested with the X in the top corner. I still think that selecting
>>> the word or hitting the space bar should do the same thing. From a
>>> proximity standpoint and Fitz's law, the space bar is faster and
>>> more
>>> efficient, but the my behavior and expectation was that clicking the
>>> word that's showing up should fill it in.
>>>
>>> Cheers!
>>>
>>> Todd Zaki Warfel
>>> President, Design & Usability Specialist
>>> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
>>> ----------------------------------
>>> Contact Info
>>> Voice: (215) 825-7423
>>> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
>>> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
>>> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
>>> ----------------------------------
>>> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
>>> In practice, they are not.
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
>>> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
>>> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Daniel Montiel
>> Information Architect
>>
>> 408.569.3607 : mob | torrentprime : aim
>>
>> "Senator, when you took your oath of office, you placed your hand on
>> the Bible and swore to uphold the Constitution. You didn't place your
>> hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible."
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
>> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org

_______________________________________________
Daniel Montiel
Information Architect

408.569.3607 : mob | torrentprime : aim

"Senator, when you took your oath of office, you placed your hand on
the Bible and swore to uphold the Constitution. You didn't place your
hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible."

5 Jul 2007 - 7:50am
Todd Warfel
2003

Actually, the X-in-a-circle is used throughout to close something -
close the suggested word, close a web browser page, etc. So, it does
do the same thing here - consistent. But I still think that selecting
the word should auto-fill and selecting the X should close the
suggestion window.

On Jul 3, 2007, at 9:07 PM, Daniel C. Montiel wrote:

> * The x-in-a-circle, which is what the tip over the word shows, is
> used pretty extensively across the iPhone's GUI to show deletion.
> It would seem odd to not have it do the same here.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
President, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

11 Sep 2007 - 6:25pm
paigesaez
2007

I just thought I would say that I love my Iphone.

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