Examples of Mathematical/Logical conditions represented visually

16 Jun 2007 - 12:32am
7 years ago
5 replies
461 reads
AlokJain
2006

Hi All,

I am looking for ways of representing following ind of expression, in
a way that it looks less technical:

(Object A or B) and (25% of Object C + 65% of Object D)

This is a simpler example, it could get much more complex. I am
exploring creating a visual language for this expression to make it
easier to understand and even define. For e.g. have Object A and
Object B be represented as boxes (labeled ofcourse) and if they are
snapped together an "And" operator is applied and if they are moved
apart an "or" operator is applied. This way these operators don't
have to be typed/selected One could group the boxes etc as well..
______ ______ ______
| | | or | |
| and | | |
|_____ |_____ | |_____ |

Has anyone seen some other good ideas around this?

Operators I need to offer are current 'And' 'or', plus, minus,
multiple, divide, take certain %..

Thanks and Regards
Alok Jain
----------------------------------
http://www.iPrincipia.com

Comments

16 Jun 2007 - 5:00pm
Todd Moy
2007

Hi Alok -
are you interested in showing the equation string, the result of the
operation, or both (i.e the result within the context of the original
equation)?

For the 'and' and '+', representing the equation and the result might be the
same. For example, the area for box A plus the area for box B when snapped
together is the area of the resulting rectangle.

For operations like %, -, and /, you might need to provide a nod to the
original values. Thoughts?

Best,
Todd

On 6/15/07, Alok Jain <alok.ajain1 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> I am looking for ways of representing following ind of expression, in
> a way that it looks less technical:
>
> (Object A or B) and (25% of Object C + 65% of Object D)
>
> This is a simpler example, it could get much more complex. I am
> exploring creating a visual language for this expression to make it
> easier to understand and even define. For e.g. have Object A and
> Object B be represented as boxes (labeled ofcourse) and if they are
> snapped together an "And" operator is applied and if they are moved
> apart an "or" operator is applied. This way these operators don't
> have to be typed/selected One could group the boxes etc as well..
> ______ ______ ______
> | | | or | |
> | and | | |
> |_____ |_____ | |_____ |
>
>
> Has anyone seen some other good ideas around this?
>
> Operators I need to offer are current 'And' 'or', plus, minus,
> multiple, divide, take certain %..
>
> Thanks and Regards
> Alok Jain
> ----------------------------------
> http://www.iPrincipia.com
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
____________________________
oombrella | User Experience Design
http://www.oombrella.com
oombrella /a/ gmail.com

17 Jun 2007 - 1:01am
AlokJain
2006

Todd,

Thanks for the reply, I am interested in allowing users to create
these expression through visual objects as opposed to typing out the
expressions. So if I want to specify filter people who have 3 years
of education and 5 years of experience , then instead of typing it,
they can just visually play with objects (experience and education).

These parameters - e.g. Education, Experience are coming from user
defined objects in a different space and can be to the tune of 80+.
So users would choose (typically not more than 7-8) from this bucket
of 80+ parameters and construct expressions and store the value of
the expression in a variable which they can use later for other
purposes.

These are not very tech savvy people, are comfortable with software
like email, not really more than that.

Best Regards
Alok Jain
----------------------------------
http://www.iPrincipia.com

On Jun 17, 2007, at 3:30 AM, Todd Moy wrote:

> Hi Alok -
>
> are you interested in showing the equation string, the result of
> the operation, or both (i.e the result within the context of the
> original equation)?
>

17 Jun 2007 - 10:16am
Todd Moy
2007

Alok, this sounds like the UI design pattern that is common to many
reporting tools. The SQL Server Reporting Services' Report Builder tool
particularly comes to mind. The conventions I've seen usually include a
series of palette of fields (text, numeric, date, etc), an expression
builder, and a preview pane. Here's a screenshot from MSDN to illustrate the
concept: http://tinyurl.com/35uvpk
Basically, a user drops a field from a palette onto the expression builder.
Since the tool knows what the datatype of the object is, it exposes those
actions that are legitimate to use. So, assuming a field was named "Years of
Experience", then the result would look something like this:

Years of Experience { is / is more than / is less than / ... } [ textinput ]

In this example, the area within curly braces is usually a selectable menu.
Based upon the selection there, a textbox or another selectable menu is
appended to the expression. If the field used was something like "Date
Hired", a datetime field, the representation in the expression builder
might be this:

Date Hired { is within } { year to date }

In this case, choosing "is within" triggers another selectable menu that
provides commonly used ranges -- year to date, last full year, last week,
etc. If they chose "is after" instead of "is within", then a calendar picker
would appear so that they could select a date.

Basically the pattern provides a canned set of operations that are valid
based upon the field, clause, and value. When multiple filters are added,
these are usually chained together vertically to prevent the expression from
wrapping. By grouping the items, you could illustrate the boolean operations
like "and", "or", and "not".

Is this what you're looking for?

Best,
Todd

On 6/16/07, Alok Jain <alok.ajain1 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Todd,
>
> Thanks for the reply, I am interested in allowing users to create these
> expression through visual objects as opposed to typing out the expressions.
> So if I want to specify filter people who have 3 years of education and 5
> years of experience , then instead of typing it, they can just visually play
> with objects (experience and education).
>
>
> These parameters - e.g. Education, Experience are coming from user defined
> objects in a different space and can be to the tune of 80+. So users would
> choose (typically not more than 7-8) from this bucket of 80+ parameters and
> construct expressions and store the value of the expression in a
> variable which they can use later for other purposes.
>
>
> These are not very tech savvy people, are comfortable with software like
> email, not really more than that.
>
> Best Regards
> Alok Jain
> ----------------------------------
> http://www.iPrincipia.com
>
>
>
>
> On Jun 17, 2007, at 3:30 AM, Todd Moy wrote:
>
> Hi Alok -
>
> are you interested in showing the equation string, the result of the
> operation, or both (i.e the result within the context of the original
> equation)?
>
>
>

--
____________________________
oombrella | User Experience Design
http://www.oombrella.com
oombrella /a/ gmail.com

18 Jun 2007 - 12:35am
AlokJain
2006

Thanks Todd,

I am looking to push this further and see if I can find a visual
equivalent for some or all of these functions. For e.g. the notion of
exact phrase in search can be represented through a set of choices
that user selects from, or could just put " " around the term. The
latter in my mind does two things:

1. Integrates the selection of of exact phrase operation to the term
2. Is better aligned to our natural thinking process

I am trying to build such natural and integrated approach for
logical and math operators... Taking an example which I know is NOT
good or workable as it is will be - lets say I have two squares
representing two objects A and B, I want to operate on, in order to
put a condition of one is greater than other, once just scales up the
square and system puts the greater than sign... Again, not a great
solution (in my mind) but represents the approach.

The other example that I shared is something I am happy with, is to
snap two squares together to say A and B, and to keep them apart to
say A or B.

Thanks again,
Alok

On Jun 17, 2007, at 8:46 PM, Todd Moy wrote:

> Alok, this sounds like the UI design pattern that is common to many
> reporting tools. The SQL Server Reporting Services' Report Builder
> tool particularly comes to mind. The conventions I've seen usually
> include a series of palette of fields (text, numeric, date, etc),
> an expression builder, and a preview pane. Here's a screenshot from
> MSDN to illustrate the concept: http://tinyurl.com/35uvpk
>
> Basically, a user drops a field from a palette onto the expression
> builder. Since the tool knows what the datatype of the object is,
> it exposes those actions that are legitimate to use. So, assuming a
> field was named "Years of Experience", then the result would look
> something like this:
>
>
> Years of Experience { is / is more than / is less than / ... }
> [ textinput ]
>
> In this example, the area within curly braces is usually a
> selectable menu. Based upon the selection there, a textbox or
> another selectable menu is appended to the expression. If the field
> used was something like "Date Hired", a datetime field, the
> representation in the expression builder might be this:
>
> Date Hired { is within } { year to date }
>
> In this case, choosing "is within" triggers another selectable menu
> that provides commonly used ranges -- year to date, last full year,
> last week, etc. If they chose "is after" instead of "is within",
> then a calendar picker would appear so that they could select a date.
>
> Basically the pattern provides a canned set of operations that are
> valid based upon the field, clause, and value. When multiple
> filters are added, these are usually chained together vertically to
> prevent the expression from wrapping. By grouping the items, you
> could illustrate the boolean operations like "and", "or", and "not".
>
> Is this what you're looking for?
>
> Best,
> Todd
>
>
>
>
>
> On 6/16/07, Alok Jain <alok.ajain1 at gmail.com> wrote:
> Todd,
>
>
> Thanks for the reply, I am interested in allowing users to create
> these expression through visual objects as opposed to typing out
> the expressions. So if I want to specify filter people who have 3
> years of education and 5 years of experience , then instead of
> typing it, they can just visually play with objects (experience and
> education).
>
>
> These parameters - e.g. Education, Experience are coming from user
> defined objects in a different space and can be to the tune of 80+.
> So users would choose (typically not more than 7-8) from this
> bucket of 80+ parameters and construct expressions and store the
> value of the expression in a variable which they can use later for
> other purposes.
>
>
> These are not very tech savvy people, are comfortable with software
> like email, not really more than that.
>
> Best Regards
> Alok Jain
> ----------------------------------
> http://www.iPrincipia.com
>
>
>
>
> On Jun 17, 2007, at 3:30 AM, Todd Moy wrote:
>
>> Hi Alok -
>>
>>
>> are you interested in showing the equation string, the result of
>> the operation, or both (i.e the result within the context of the
>> original equation)?
>>
>
>
>
>
> --
> ____________________________
> oombrella | User Experience Design
> http://www.oombrella.com
> oombrella /a/ gmail.com

18 Jun 2007 - 4:21am
bhakti भक्ति
2006

We can iconize conditons as :
Link Icon for *AND*ed conditons
'/' slash for *OR*ed condtions and so on..

Assumptions are:
The UI design is contextual i.e for condtion building as soon as a value has
been selected/insert on the LHS (left hand side) the appliable operators
will be made available thru a easy popup for selection.
On selection of this operator will then validate and Iconize the condtion
visually e.g: AND oprerator will turn into a Link (chain) icon and a graphic
for OR so that it will give a visual feedback that the two objects are ORed

My 2 cents

Bhakti

Syndicate content Get the feed