Core animation

8 Jun 2007 - 4:48pm
7 years ago
7 replies
389 reads
cfmdesigns
2004

Fred Beecher <fbeecher at gmail.com> wrote:

>My general attitude towards this article is one of cautious
>skepticism, likely due to my being a cranky UXP consultant. It's also
>likely due to the terms "animation" and "UI" being used in the
>same paragraph (or sentence even). It makes me... twitchy.

And with good reason, I'm sure. We read "animated UI" and we think "all singing, all dancing, can't make it shut up and be still". Haven't people got that out of their system yet?

What we'll hopefully see, though, are an increase in subtle and ambient "animations", the sort which take us toward a "cinematic UI". Select an object that can be dropped on some targets but not others, and the available ones "signal" that they are viable, so you don't have scrub over things to discover them. Google pushpins which drop from the sky. Widgets that "flip over" to show their backs. Subtle animations to indicate movement, age, availability, etc. All the things which make the virtual world slightly more real and/or slightly more whimsical.

(Whimsy. There's noting wrong with it, so long as it doesn't get in the way. If I have to wait an extra 1/4 second for the flying pushpins, no big deal. If Disco's smoke prevents me from working in other windows -- or if breathing it increases my chance of hard drive cancer -- then it's bad.)

Any of these things and more we can do today, but we have to invent the wheel on each of them. A core library should make those things more available to all developers, and should add greater consistency to what is created.

-- Jim

Comments

12 Jun 2007 - 9:00am
Fred Beecher
2006

On 6/8/07, Jim Drew <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:
>
> What we'll hopefully see, though, are an increase in subtle and ambient "animations", the sort which take us toward a "cinematic UI". Select an object that can be dropped on some targets but not others, and the available ones "signal" that they are viable, so you don't have scrub over things to discover them. Google pushpins which drop from the sky. Widgets that "flip over" to show their backs. Subtle animations to indicate movement, age, availability, etc. All the things which make the virtual world slightly more real and/or slightly more whimsical.

I think that's an important insight. In one of the other permutations
of this thread, someone was talking about how there are a lot of best
practices around movement that have been in use for decades in the
movie making industry. This is probably a good place to start in order
to develop an understandable language (very very high-level patterns &
guidelines) for designing in this sort of technical context.

Take care,
Fred

27 Jun 2007 - 1:26am
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

Here is an example of whimsical animation, which I actually like. "BumpTop"
desktop by Anand Agarawala: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ntg1Gpgjk-A .

Anand also demonstrates an interesting pie shaped mouse menu (I don't think
it is as useable as plain vanilla vertical menu, mostly because it is not
easy to scan).

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is the Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

On 6/8/07, Jim Drew <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:

> Fred Beecher <fbeecher at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >My general attitude towards this article is one of cautious
> >skepticism, likely due to my being a cranky UXP consultant. It's also
> >likely due to the terms "animation" and "UI" being used in the
> >same paragraph (or sentence even). It makes me... twitchy.
>
> And with good reason, I'm sure. We read "animated UI" and we think "all
> singing, all dancing, can't make it shut up and be still". Haven't people
> got that out of their system yet?
>
> What we'll hopefully see, though, are an increase in subtle and ambient
> "animations", the sort which take us toward a "cinematic UI". Select an
> object that can be dropped on some targets but not others, and the available
> ones "signal" that they are viable, so you don't have scrub over things to
> discover them. Google pushpins which drop from the sky. Widgets that "flip
> over" to show their backs. Subtle animations to indicate movement, age,
> availability, etc. All the things which make the virtual world slightly
> more real and/or slightly more whimsical.
>
> (Whimsy. There's noting wrong with it, so long as it doesn't get in the
> way. If I have to wait an extra 1/4 second for the flying pushpins, no big
> deal. If Disco's smoke prevents me from working in other windows -- or if
> breathing it increases my chance of hard drive cancer -- then it's bad.)
>
> Any of these things and more we can do today, but we have to invent the
> wheel on each of them. A core library should make those things more
> available to all developers, and should add greater consistency to what is
> created.
>
> -- Jim
>
>

28 Jun 2007 - 8:20pm
natekendrick
2005

Umm, isn't the beauty of technology that it virtualizes, automates,
systematizes tasks by defying physical barriers? Who the heck wants
to clean your real desktop then clean your virtual desktop the same way?

The folks that made Second Life let you fly or teleport to
destinations... not make you walk there. Could you imagine? "We have
a whole new world for you... its just like the real world! haha,
gotcha!"

On Jun 26, 2007, at 11:26 PM, Oleh Kovalchuke wrote:

> Here is an example of whimsical animation, which I actually like.
> "BumpTop"
> desktop by Anand Agarawala: http://www.youtube.com/watch?
> v=Ntg1Gpgjk-A .
>
> Anand also demonstrates an interesting pie shaped mouse menu (I
> don't think
> it is as useable as plain vanilla vertical menu, mostly because it
> is not
> easy to scan).
>
> --
> Oleh Kovalchuke
> Interaction Design is the Design of Time
> http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

29 Jun 2007 - 12:16am
dmitryn
2004

Oleh,

FYI, pie menus have been around for at least 20 years, and have been
shown to have distinct usability advantages for small and medium sized
menus due to greater ease of item selection:

http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=57167.57182

Dmitry

On 6/26/07, Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring at gmail.com> wrote:
> Here is an example of whimsical animation, which I actually like. "BumpTop"
> desktop by Anand Agarawala: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ntg1Gpgjk-A .
>
> Anand also demonstrates an interesting pie shaped mouse menu (I don't think
> it is as useable as plain vanilla vertical menu, mostly because it is not
> easy to scan).
>
> --
> Oleh Kovalchuke
> Interaction Design is the Design of Time
> http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm
>
>
>
> On 6/8/07, Jim Drew <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:
>
> > Fred Beecher <fbeecher at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > >My general attitude towards this article is one of cautious
> > >skepticism, likely due to my being a cranky UXP consultant. It's also
> > >likely due to the terms "animation" and "UI" being used in the
> > >same paragraph (or sentence even). It makes me... twitchy.
> >
> > And with good reason, I'm sure. We read "animated UI" and we think "all
> > singing, all dancing, can't make it shut up and be still". Haven't people
> > got that out of their system yet?
> >
> > What we'll hopefully see, though, are an increase in subtle and ambient
> > "animations", the sort which take us toward a "cinematic UI". Select an
> > object that can be dropped on some targets but not others, and the available
> > ones "signal" that they are viable, so you don't have scrub over things to
> > discover them. Google pushpins which drop from the sky. Widgets that "flip
> > over" to show their backs. Subtle animations to indicate movement, age,
> > availability, etc. All the things which make the virtual world slightly
> > more real and/or slightly more whimsical.
> >
> > (Whimsy. There's noting wrong with it, so long as it doesn't get in the
> > way. If I have to wait an extra 1/4 second for the flying pushpins, no big
> > deal. If Disco's smoke prevents me from working in other windows -- or if
> > breathing it increases my chance of hard drive cancer -- then it's bad.)
> >
> > Any of these things and more we can do today, but we have to invent the
> > wheel on each of them. A core library should make those things more
> > available to all developers, and should add greater consistency to what is
> > created.
> >
> > -- Jim
> >
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

29 Jun 2007 - 12:51am
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

Thanks, Dmitry.

The summary looks interesting. Unfortunately I cannot read the entire
article.

Do you know at which size of the menu the slices become too small to be
easily acquired with mouse(incidentally, I think, that this should become
less of a problem for touch screens)?

Aside from the difficulty of scanning the list of the items arranged in a
circle, another obvious problem is consistency of slice position/angle/size
for different menus within application. For instance, I would like to have
"Copy" and "Paste" slices in exactly the same position regardless of the
size of the menu. I wonder if the authors had addressed this issue.

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is the Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

On 6/28/07, Dmitry Nekrasovski <mail.dmitry at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Oleh,
>
> FYI, pie menus have been around for at least 20 years, and have been
> shown to have distinct usability advantages for small and medium sized
> menus due to greater ease of item selection:
>
> http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=57167.57182
>
> Dmitry
>
> On 6/26/07, Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring at gmail.com> wrote:
> > Here is an example of whimsical animation, which I actually like.
> "BumpTop"
> > desktop by Anand Agarawala: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ntg1Gpgjk-A .
> >
> > Anand also demonstrates an interesting pie shaped mouse menu (I don't
> think
> > it is as useable as plain vanilla vertical menu, mostly because it is
> not
> > easy to scan).
> >
> > --
> > Oleh Kovalchuke
> > Interaction Design is the Design of Time
> > http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm
> >
> >
> >
> > On 6/8/07, Jim Drew <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:
> >
> > > Fred Beecher <fbeecher at gmail.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > >My general attitude towards this article is one of cautious
> > > >skepticism, likely due to my being a cranky UXP consultant. It's also
> > > >likely due to the terms "animation" and "UI" being used in the
> > > >same paragraph (or sentence even). It makes me... twitchy.
> > >
> > > And with good reason, I'm sure. We read "animated UI" and we think
> "all
> > > singing, all dancing, can't make it shut up and be still". Haven't
> people
> > > got that out of their system yet?
> > >
> > > What we'll hopefully see, though, are an increase in subtle and
> ambient
> > > "animations", the sort which take us toward a "cinematic UI". Select
> an
> > > object that can be dropped on some targets but not others, and the
> available
> > > ones "signal" that they are viable, so you don't have scrub over
> things to
> > > discover them. Google pushpins which drop from the sky. Widgets that
> "flip
> > > over" to show their backs. Subtle animations to indicate movement,
> age,
> > > availability, etc. All the things which make the virtual world
> slightly
> > > more real and/or slightly more whimsical.
> > >
> > > (Whimsy. There's noting wrong with it, so long as it doesn't get in
> the
> > > way. If I have to wait an extra 1/4 second for the flying pushpins,
> no big
> > > deal. If Disco's smoke prevents me from working in other windows --
> or if
> > > breathing it increases my chance of hard drive cancer -- then it's
> bad.)
> > >
> > > Any of these things and more we can do today, but we have to invent
> the
> > > wheel on each of them. A core library should make those things more
> > > available to all developers, and should add greater consistency to
> what is
> > > created.
> > >
> > > -- Jim
> > >
>
>
>

29 Jun 2007 - 6:25am
Jeremiah Peschka
2007

In Second Life, pie menus are used for a great deal of interaction with the
world (when simply a click will not suffice). The right click pie menus are
always the same size (8 items, I believe) and there is usually a "More"
option. Almost always the actions are the same: Use, Sit, Take, Take a
Copy, etc. In some cases, designers and developers can override the default
menu items to better match the function of the item. For example, right
clicking on a car might substitute Drive for Sit if you right click on the
driver's seat.

Pie menus can be very useful if implemented well - they concentrate the most
commonly used functionality into the first pie.

On 6/29/07, Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Thanks, Dmitry.
>
> The summary looks interesting. Unfortunately I cannot read the entire
> article.
>
> Do you know at which size of the menu the slices become too small to be
> easily acquired with mouse(incidentally, I think, that this should become
> less of a problem for touch screens)?
>
> Aside from the difficulty of scanning the list of the items arranged in a
> circle, another obvious problem is consistency of slice
> position/angle/size
> for different menus within application. For instance, I would like to have
> "Copy" and "Paste" slices in exactly the same position regardless of the
> size of the menu. I wonder if the authors had addressed this issue.
>
> --
> Oleh Kovalchuke
> Interaction Design is the Design of Time
> http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm
>
>
> On 6/28/07, Dmitry Nekrasovski <mail.dmitry at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Oleh,
> >
> > FYI, pie menus have been around for at least 20 years, and have been
> > shown to have distinct usability advantages for small and medium sized
> > menus due to greater ease of item selection:
> >
> > http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=57167.57182
> >
> > Dmitry
> >
> > On 6/26/07, Oleh Kovalchuke <tangospring at gmail.com> wrote:
> > > Here is an example of whimsical animation, which I actually like.
> > "BumpTop"
> > > desktop by Anand Agarawala: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ntg1Gpgjk-A.
> > >
> > > Anand also demonstrates an interesting pie shaped mouse menu (I don't
> > think
> > > it is as useable as plain vanilla vertical menu, mostly because it is
> > not
> > > easy to scan).
> > >
> > > --
> > > Oleh Kovalchuke
> > > Interaction Design is the Design of Time
> > > http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > On 6/8/07, Jim Drew <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Fred Beecher <fbeecher at gmail.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > >My general attitude towards this article is one of cautious
> > > > >skepticism, likely due to my being a cranky UXP consultant. It's
> also
> > > > >likely due to the terms "animation" and "UI" being used in the
> > > > >same paragraph (or sentence even). It makes me... twitchy.
> > > >
> > > > And with good reason, I'm sure. We read "animated UI" and we think
> > "all
> > > > singing, all dancing, can't make it shut up and be still". Haven't
> > people
> > > > got that out of their system yet?
> > > >
> > > > What we'll hopefully see, though, are an increase in subtle and
> > ambient
> > > > "animations", the sort which take us toward a "cinematic
> UI". Select
> > an
> > > > object that can be dropped on some targets but not others, and the
> > available
> > > > ones "signal" that they are viable, so you don't have scrub over
> > things to
> > > > discover them. Google pushpins which drop from the sky. Widgets
> that
> > "flip
> > > > over" to show their backs. Subtle animations to indicate movement,
> > age,
> > > > availability, etc. All the things which make the virtual world
> > slightly
> > > > more real and/or slightly more whimsical.
> > > >
> > > > (Whimsy. There's noting wrong with it, so long as it doesn't get in
> > the
> > > > way. If I have to wait an extra 1/4 second for the flying pushpins,
> > no big
> > > > deal. If Disco's smoke prevents me from working in other windows --
> > or if
> > > > breathing it increases my chance of hard drive cancer -- then it's
> > bad.)
> > > >
> > > > Any of these things and more we can do today, but we have to invent
> > the
> > > > wheel on each of them. A core library should make those things more
> > > > available to all developers, and should add greater consistency to
> > what is
> > > > created.
> > > >
> > > > -- Jim
> > > >
> >
> >
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://beta.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://beta.ixda.org/help
> Unsubscribe ................ http://beta.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> Questions .................. list at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://beta.ixda.org
>

29 Jun 2007 - 11:12am
natekendrick
2005

On Jun 29, 2007, at 4:25 AM, Jeremiah Peschka wrote:

> Pie menus can be very useful if implemented well - they concentrate
> the most
> commonly used functionality into the first pie.

This is a great point... some interface items can be well used and
misused - that's what an interaction designer does at the core of
their job!

Dunno why that lightbulb just went on, but all the talk around what
an interaction design does/doesn't do seems to be just that simple to
me - albeit its Friday and my mind is halfway in shutdown mode already.

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