Which is the most used tool for UX nowadays?

30 May 2007 - 9:48am
7 years ago
21 replies
2173 reads
Gustavo Gawry
2006

Which one have you been using? Visio, Axure, Intuitect (plus Visio),
OmniGraffle, Smartdraw, iRise, Powerpoint...

I have been using Axure and Powerpoint...

--
Gustavo Gawry
User Experience Analyst
Analista de Experiência do Usuário

www.gawry.com (in portuguese)

Comments

30 May 2007 - 10:02am
Ivo Domburg
2007

I guess paper and pencil are still the most used tools...

I also use OmniGraffle for outlining concepts in charts, Illustrator
for creating wireframes, Photoshop for screen impressions an detailed
GUI design and Dreamweaver and Flash for prototyping.

gr. Ivo

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16746

30 May 2007 - 10:10am
Dan Saffer
2003

Our brains.

No offense, Gustavo, but these threads on software are getting tiresome.

A good interaction designer should be able to design a great system
with pencil and paper if need be. The tool itself doesn't matter
nearly as much as the thinking behind our designs. The tools can only
help--some would argue only marginally. For me, software does help
with organization and presentation, but can actually hinder my
thinking process by making it easy for me to do detailed design
sloppily (e.g. dropping something from my UI library into a design
instead of really thinking it through again).

Dan

Dan Saffer, M.Des., IDSA
Sr. Interaction Designer, Adaptive Path
http://www.adaptivepath.com
http://www.odannyboy.com

30 May 2007 - 10:18am
Dave Malouf
2005

A similar answer to Dan's might be ...
Lookie here:
http://beta.ixda.org/topic_tools.php

someone's gotta start using this tool. ;)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16746

30 May 2007 - 11:32am
Mark Schraad
2006

Learning how to use your brain has much more career potential than learning how to operate any specific software.

On Wednesday, May 30, 2007, at 11:10AM, "Dan Saffer" <dan at odannyboy.com> wrote:
>Our brains.
>
>No offense, Gustavo, but these threads on software are getting tiresome.
>
>A good interaction designer should be able to design a great system
>with pencil and paper if need be. The tool itself doesn't matter
>nearly as much as the thinking behind our designs. The tools can only
>help--some would argue only marginally. For me, software does help
>with organization and presentation, but can actually hinder my
>thinking process by making it easy for me to do detailed design
>sloppily (e.g. dropping something from my UI library into a design
>instead of really thinking it through again).
>
>Dan
>

30 May 2007 - 2:51pm
Jeffrey D. Gimzek
2007

On May 30, 2007, at 8:18 AM, David Malouf wrote:

> A similar answer to Dan's might be ...
> Lookie here:
> http://beta.ixda.org/topic_tools.php
>
> someone's gotta start using this tool. ;)

to your point, how do we add "tags" to our posts when posting from an
email app ?

jd

--

Jeffrey D. Gimzek
Digital Experience Designer

www.jdgimzek.com
thundercougarfalconbird.blogspot.com

30 May 2007 - 3:35pm
Jeff Howard
2004

Hi Jeffrey,

You can't tag from e-mail or RSS right now. We thought about it but
you need to use the site for now if you want to tag in this initial
release. Also, posts don't get tagged individually--only the thread
as a whole.

Still, if you want to include tags in your posts anyway, they might
help with Google indexing.

// jeff

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16746

30 May 2007 - 3:38pm
Dave Malouf
2005

You can't. you can ONLY add tags (in this version) in the application.
We were thinking about ways of adding a string in a footer for tags,
but you would never be able to see existing tags. But the main reason
we didn't do it was scope. Can only do so much in a first revision.

-- dave

On 5/30/07, Jeffrey D. Gimzek <listserv at jdgimzek.com> wrote:
>
> On May 30, 2007, at 8:18 AM, David Malouf wrote:
>
> > A similar answer to Dan's might be ...
> > Lookie here:
> > http://beta.ixda.org/topic_tools.php
> >
> > someone's gotta start using this tool. ;)
>
>
> to your point, how do we add "tags" to our posts when posting from an
> email app ?
>
> jd
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Jeffrey D. Gimzek
> Digital Experience Designer
>
> www.jdgimzek.com
> thundercougarfalconbird.blogspot.com
>
>
>
>
>

--
David Malouf
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixda.org/
http://motorola.com/

30 May 2007 - 10:30am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 30 May 2007, at 15:48, Gustavo Gawry wrote:

> Which one have you been using? Visio, Axure, Intuitect (plus Visio),
> OmniGraffle, Smartdraw, iRise, Powerpoint...
>
> I have been using Axure and Powerpoint...

Hmmm...

Pens. Paper. Whiteboards. Post it notes. Cardboard. Talking to
people. Listening to people. Watching people.

... oh... and computers :-)

Adrian

30 May 2007 - 7:48pm
Todd Warfel
2003

InDesign and Illustrator for flows and wireframes. Starting to work
with Fireworks for wireframes and possibly prototyping, we'll see.
Currently, prototyping is done using Flash and Dreamweaver.

On May 30, 2007, at 10:48 AM, Gustavo Gawry wrote:

> Which one have you been using? Visio, Axure, Intuitect (plus Visio),
> OmniGraffle, Smartdraw, iRise, Powerpoint...
>
> I have been using Axure and Powerpoint...

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

30 May 2007 - 8:44pm
Ari
2006

i use axure for wireframes and specs. for smaller projects, axure is very
nice for doing interactive prototypes. for the type of projects i've been
working on lately, it's a bit too cumbersome for prototypes but its spec
generation capabilities are a god-send.

On 5/30/07, Todd Zaki Warfel <lists at toddwarfel.com> wrote:
>
> InDesign and Illustrator for flows and wireframes. Starting to work
> with Fireworks for wireframes and possibly prototyping, we'll see.
> Currently, prototyping is done using Flash and Dreamweaver.
>
> On May 30, 2007, at 10:48 AM, Gustavo Gawry wrote:
>
> > Which one have you been using? Visio, Axure, Intuitect (plus Visio),
> > OmniGraffle, Smartdraw, iRise, Powerpoint...
> >
> > I have been using Axure and Powerpoint...
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
> Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at messagefirst.com
> AIM: twarfel at mac.com
> Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

31 May 2007 - 2:16pm
itst
2007

Mark Schraad wrote:
> Learning how to use your brain has much more career potential than learning how to operate any specific software.

Some MSCE would disagree ;)

*scnr

--
Sascha

1 Jun 2007 - 1:00am
Navneet Nair
2004

On 5/30/07, Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com> wrote:
>
>
> A good interaction designer should be able to design a great system
> with pencil and paper if need be. The tool itself doesn't matter
> nearly as much as the thinking behind our designs...

Couldn't agree more. The thoughts are echoed in this podcast interview with
Bill Buxton where Jon Udell talks to him about his new book...

http://channel9.msdn.com/media/ju_buxton.mp3

Cheers
Navneet

----------------------------------------------------
Navneet Nair
Interaction Architect
onClipEvent: form follows function();
----------------------------------------------------
Website: http://www.onclipevent.com
Blog: http://enterframe.blogspot.com/

1 Jun 2007 - 3:59am
stauciuc
2006

I agree. And I also have seen that discussion too many times (with the same
tools mentioned again and again).

But although learning how to use your brain may play a stronger role in how
well you do your job, knowing how to use the tools (and your results,
ofcourse) is what actually gets you the job, unfortunately (at least at
junior level). Because you will always get to that part of the interview /
job requirements: So, do you know Visio? Powerpoint? Flash? Axure?
Omnigrafle? Html + CSS? etc?

And there might be something else: maybe using the tools (especially pen and
paper) seems so natural for the senior designers, that they don't need to
concentrate on them anymore. Junior designers definetely need at least some
arsenal of tools in order to get to some good results.

On 5/30/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> Learning how to use your brain has much more career potential than
> learning how to operate any specific software.
>
> On Wednesday, May 30, 2007, at 11:10AM, "Dan Saffer" <dan at odannyboy.com>
> wrote:
> >Our brains.
> >
> >No offense, Gustavo, but these threads on software are getting tiresome
>

--
Sergiu Sebastian Tauciuc
http://www.sergiutauciuc.ro/en/

1 Jun 2007 - 6:49am
Vishal Subraman...
2005

Right on Sebi. How many interviews have folks had the pleasure of answering
the question 'whats your design philosophy?' I've never had questions beyond
my degrees, projects, tools, methods (the better ones) etc. I'm curious to
know if people with more experience have it any different (apart from
questions about their experience itself).

But although learning how to use your brain may play a stronger role in how
> well you do your job, knowing how to use the tools (and your results,
> ofcourse) is what actually gets you the job, unfortunately (at least at
> junior level). Because you will always get to that part of the interview /
> job requirements: So, do you know Visio? Powerpoint? Flash? Axure?
> Omnigrafle? Html + CSS? etc?
>
>

--
-Vishal
http://www.vishaliyer.com

1 Jun 2007 - 7:06am
Ari
2006

i think an oft overlooked interview question is what kind of projects have
you actually done???

i mean degrees and a broad knowledge of tools is all good and nice but in
practice it's one's overall experience and body of work that is crucial to
success.

i can't tell you how many people i've come across (as a co-worker and
interviewer) who get paid big salaries and who look great on paper but when
it comes to delivering on a project, they're all talk! at least that was the
case when i was back in the agency/interactive agency world.

thoughts?

On 6/1/07, Vishal Iyer <vishaliyer1 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Right on Sebi. How many interviews have folks had the pleasure of
> answering
> the question 'whats your design philosophy?' I've never had questions
> beyond
> my degrees, projects, tools, methods (the better ones) etc. I'm curious to
> know if people with more experience have it any different (apart from
> questions about their experience itself).
>
>
> But although learning how to use your brain may play a stronger role in
> how
> > well you do your job, knowing how to use the tools (and your results,
> > ofcourse) is what actually gets you the job, unfortunately (at least at
> > junior level). Because you will always get to that part of the interview
> /
> > job requirements: So, do you know Visio? Powerpoint? Flash? Axure?
> > Omnigrafle? Html + CSS? etc?
> >
> >
>
> --
> -Vishal
> http://www.vishaliyer.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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--
--------------------------------------------------
www.flyingyogi.com
--------------------------------------------------

1 Jun 2007 - 7:15am
Vishal Subraman...
2005

Not only what kind of project you've done, but whats your contribution to
the project?

The all-talk people are Orwellian Boxer's antithesis manifestations.
Unfortunately the former does a lot better than the latter.

i think an oft overlooked interview question is what kind of projects have
> you actually done???
>
> i mean degrees and a broad knowledge of tools is all good and nice but in
> practice it's one's overall experience and body of work that is crucial to
> success.
>
> i can't tell you how many people i've come across (as a co-worker and
> interviewer) who get paid big salaries and who look great on paper but when
> it comes to delivering on a project, they're all talk! at least that was the
> case when i was back in the agency/interactive agency world.
>
> thoughts?
>
>
--
-Vishal
http://www.vishaliyer.com

1 Jun 2007 - 8:02am
Gustavo Gawry
2006

I'm sorry if i was not clear enough but i just wanted objective awnsers.
i dont want this information to know which tool should i study,
i wan't to help in one decision that my employer need's to do...

as i said before we need to decide which tool will we use (which one should
we buy) at work

On 6/1/07, Vishal Iyer <vishaliyer1 em gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Not only what kind of project you've done, but whats your contribution to
> the project?
>
> The all-talk people are Orwellian Boxer's antithesis manifestations.
> Unfortunately the former does a lot better than the latter.
>
> i think an oft overlooked interview question is what kind of projects have
> > you actually done???
> >
> > i mean degrees and a broad knowledge of tools is all good and nice but
> in
> > practice it's one's overall experience and body of work that is crucial
> to
> > success.
> >
> > i can't tell you how many people i've come across (as a co-worker and
> > interviewer) who get paid big salaries and who look great on paper but
> when
> > it comes to delivering on a project, they're all talk! at least that was
> the
> > case when i was back in the agency/interactive agency world.
> >
> > thoughts?
> >
> >
> --
> -Vishal
> http://www.vishaliyer.com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss em ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
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> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
Gustavo Gawry
User Experience Analyst
Analista de Experiência do Usuário

www.gawry.com (in portuguese)

1 Jun 2007 - 10:32am
Chris Bernard
2007

On my last set of interviews, mostly director level at large enterprises I don't think I pulled a portfolio out or fired up a browser once during the interview. Those artifacts often got me in the door but what got the interest or the offer was the conversation.

Much of this will be dependent on what you're being hired to do however. Being a design manager requires a certain set of skills. Being a practice leader that owns the vision for you group requires a certain set of skills too.

Sketching and conversation represents a quick short hand for people to derive insights into how you think. It's a skill that all IxD folks will benefit from. But if you're being hired to drive Flash all day or actually be a builder of things tools are pretty important but they are really going to vary depending on where you work.

The canonical set of tools most designers need to have down are probably Adobe products such as Photoshop, Flash, Illustrator, In Design, Dreamweaver. Depending on where you go you might find other tools are important to. If you can build wireframes in Illustrator you'll find you can pick up any other tool quickly too (Visio or Omnigraffle). If you build artifacts in In Design you'll find you can quickly learn how to do it in something else (Quark, Word, PowerPoint).

As the company you work with specializes however things can get tricky. It's very likely that if you're working with .NET based shops in the coming years that they will expect or possibly demand that you're using (or at least finishing) outputs and artifacts using Expression Studio for example. Shops focused on Apollo, Flex and Flash will have similar but different expectations as will eventually the tools you use to create applications for new technologies like Google Gears.

Regarding what to get started with...
For generic design tools however I'd start with Adobe Creative Suite Premium and probably Microsoft Office with Visio (or Omnigraffle if you're on a Mac). If you're looking at doing .NET work or designing for it you should consider adding Expression Studio to your arsenal as well.

Chris Bernard
Microsoft
User Experience Evangelist
chris.bernard at microsoft.com
312.925.4095

Blog: www.designthinkingdigest.com
Design: www.microsoft.com/design
Tools: www.microsoft.com/expression

"The future is already here. It's just not evenly distributed." William Gibson

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Vishal Iyer
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 6:49 AM
To: IxDA Discuss
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Which is the most used tool for UX nowadays?

Right on Sebi. How many interviews have folks had the pleasure of answering
the question 'whats your design philosophy?' I've never had questions beyond
my degrees, projects, tools, methods (the better ones) etc. I'm curious to
know if people with more experience have it any different (apart from
questions about their experience itself).

But although learning how to use your brain may play a stronger role in how
> well you do your job, knowing how to use the tools (and your results,
> ofcourse) is what actually gets you the job, unfortunately (at least at
> junior level). Because you will always get to that part of the interview /
> job requirements: So, do you know Visio? Powerpoint? Flash? Axure?
> Omnigrafle? Html + CSS? etc?
>
>

--
-Vishal
http://www.vishaliyer.com
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
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1 Jun 2007 - 9:54am
mehera OBrien
2007

Actually, I find I get the "what's your design philosophy" question quite a
bit (in other words perhaps). And I'm the one doing the interviewing! :) But
I find candidates of all levels are interviewing me and the company just as
much as I am interviewing them. And understanding how I personally view
Interaction Design and it's role in our organization is key to them
determining if they want to work here in the first place, position title and
salary aside.

My favorite question to ask is actually: What has been one of your favorite
projects to date and why? There is no right answer to this question, but I
love how varied the responses are. It's shocking to me that a lot of people
can't answer it, even. But the ones who do give a detailed answer usually
give you a peek inside of what is important to them - culturally within an
organization, their role on the project, sometimes what they are most
passionate about in the field and, sometimes, what their philosophy is.

This is usually the last question I ask and it can actually be a deal
breaker, even if the candidate has all the right tools and degrees and
resume.

Oh, and to go back to the original question, we use Omni Graffle Pro in my
office. We're Mac based and I find Omni Graffle is sort of the best of Visio
and Illustrator combined in an easy to use (and easy to learn) interface.
Although, I do find Visio a bit better for building sitemaps and user flows.
But now that I'm on Omni Graffle, I'd struggle to go back to Visio for
wireframing. If you are checking out graffle, there are tons of online
stencils others have built and share here: http://graffletopia.com/

Enjoy!

On 6/1/07 7:49 AM, "Vishal Iyer" <vishaliyer1 at gmail.com> wrote:

> Right on Sebi. How many interviews have folks had the pleasure of answering
> the question 'whats your design philosophy?' I've never had questions beyond
> my degrees, projects, tools, methods (the better ones) etc. I'm curious to
> know if people with more experience have it any different (apart from
> questions about their experience itself).
>
>
> But although learning how to use your brain may play a stronger role in how
>> well you do your job, knowing how to use the tools (and your results,
>> ofcourse) is what actually gets you the job, unfortunately (at least at
>> junior level). Because you will always get to that part of the interview /
>> job requirements: So, do you know Visio? Powerpoint? Flash? Axure?
>> Omnigrafle? Html + CSS? etc?
>>
>>

--
Mehera O¹Brien
Associate Creative Director ­ User Experience

Main: +1 212 989 2572
Direct: +1 212 624 2142

mehera.obrien at akqa.com | http://www.akqa.com

AKQA Inc, 135 Spring Street 6th Floor West, New York, NY 10012 USA

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1 Jun 2007 - 10:52am
Dave Malouf
2005

Gustavo,

I would buy the Premium Design suite form Adobe today. I'm not sure
if the Web design or the Designer Premium editions have everything
you need, but they are pretty much a great collection of tools in a
single (very nicely priced suite).

What I hate about this packaging is that you don't get in the same
package (that I found) Flash, dreamweaver, fireworks, and indesign.
That is the combination I would choose, but if you had to make a
choice, be sure to have inDesign for your documents, Fireworks for
screen design from wireframe to detailed layouts and flash for
prototyping.

Yup, I don't like Illustrator. It does way more than I need and not
enough of what I do need and the new features of fireworks just
rocks, IMHO. Photoshop on the otherhand is the biggest piece of
bloated software on the planet. People say Office is bloated, sheesh!
Ok, forget that bit of flamebait. I would just get one of those
suites.

I would also invest in an MSDN subscription. Something people don't
talk about here. For that subscription you get Visio, Expression
blend and web and Visual Studio. All good solid tools for an
interaction design to engage with as part of the product lifecycle.

(I bet you weren't expecting that, Chris.)

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://beta.ixda.org/discuss?post=16746

2 Jun 2007 - 12:48pm
Bill Fernandez
2007

I've used Canvas for years. Every now and then I try something new
(e.g. Omnigraffle) but despite it's bugs and annoyances I always come
back to Canvas as being the only app with the flexibility and
capabilities I need to most quickly and easily take a project from
requirements gathering, through brainstorming, through sketching,
etc., to final design specs.

--Bill

At 11:48 AM -0300 5/30/07, Gustavo Gawry wrote:
>Which one have you been using? Visio, Axure, Intuitect (plus Visio),
>OmniGraffle, Smartdraw, iRise, Powerpoint...

--

======================================================================
Bill Fernandez * User Interface Architect * Bill Fernandez Design

(505) 346-3080 * bf_list1 AT billfernandez DOT com *
http://billfernandez.com
======================================================================

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