Incentives in medical domain

3 May 2007 - 8:51am
6 years ago
4 replies
511 reads
Maral Haar
2006

Hi everybody,

I work at a company who develops medical devices. There are strict
regulations concerning bribary in this domain. Becuase of that my boss
is very concerned about giving incentives to nurses or doctors who
participate in an usability test or a focus group or something
similar.

Does anybody here also work in the medical domain or a similar
regulated area? How do you handle incentives for users who participate
in evaluations of prototypes or requirement analysises?

Thanks in advance,

Maral

Comments

3 May 2007 - 9:20am
DrWex
2006

I have not worked in the medical device area but I have worked with
test subjects where similar ethical concerns about direct compensation
were present. In these cases we usually made an offer to donate to an
appropriate charitable organization. The donation was of the same
amount as would have been provided as token compensation for
completion of the experiment. In the case of doctors you might
consider MSF/Doctors Without Borders
(http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/) as they are highly respected
in the profession.

On 5/3/07, Maral Haar <maral.haar at gmail.com> wrote:
> I work at a company who develops medical devices. There are strict
> regulations concerning bribary in this domain. Becuase of that my boss
> is very concerned about giving incentives to nurses or doctors who
> participate in an usability test or a focus group or something
> similar.
>
> Does anybody here also work in the medical domain or a similar
> regulated area? How do you handle incentives for users who participate
> in evaluations of prototypes or requirement analysises?

3 May 2007 - 10:08am
Mark Schraad
2006

Maral,

I have done a lot of research and design work in thehealthcare/pharma world. While a spiff in the form of a gift or mney is great, that is typically not why you get participation. I have found at the professional level, inspite of being over worked and incredibly busy, if the situation and topic is important they will make the time. Specifically, I have spent time with pharmacists, consulting pharmacisit, doctors and pharma reps - all very busy... and was able to easily get an hour or more from each of them for interviews and work session. A group of us put together a scenario planning weekend for the healthcare industry last spring and had no trouble finding experts that traveld at their own expense to participate. A lot of it is how you positions the tpic. The nature of the topic is even more important. Hope this helps...

Mark

On Thursday, May 03, 2007, at 09:52AM, "Maral Haar" <maral.haar at gmail.com> wrote:
>Hi everybody,
>
>I work at a company who develops medical devices. There are strict
>regulations concerning bribary in this domain. Becuase of that my boss
>is very concerned about giving incentives to nurses or doctors who
>participate in an usability test or a focus group or something
>similar.
>
>Does anybody here also work in the medical domain or a similar
>regulated area? How do you handle incentives for users who participate
>in evaluations of prototypes or requirement analysises?
>
>Thanks in advance,
>
>Maral

3 May 2007 - 10:34am
Dan Saffer
2003

On May 3, 2007, at 6:51 AM, Maral Haar wrote:

> I work at a company who develops medical devices. There are strict
> regulations concerning bribary in this domain. Becuase of that my boss
> is very concerned about giving incentives to nurses or doctors who
> participate in an usability test or a focus group or something
> similar.

Bribery is when you get a gift for nothing or the (unspoken) promise
of a later favor. Incentives for research participation aren't that
at all: they are instead about paying people for their participation
in your study, not for some possible favor. Medical professionals are
no different from other professionals in that their time is valuable,
as are their insights into your project. You are paying them for
their subject area expertise. It is standard practice and outlined in
the IRB:

http://www.fda.gov/oc/ohrt/irbs/toc4.html#payment

The legal issues are, as I understand them, around medical staff
accepting gifts from pharmaceutical companies/sales reps in return
for their prescribing their products.

Dan

3 May 2007 - 3:29pm
Elizabeth Bacon
2003

Hi Maral,

Dan is exactly correct. I work at a Fortune 100 medical device company, and
we simply have each participant in a usability test or any other IxD
research activity sign a consulting agreement that specifies the hourly rate
at which that participant will be compensated. Rates vary for role
(physicians get more than nurses, for example). We also use this agreement
to specify the non-disclosure aspects of the conversation, which is
important in many domains but especially touchy in medical device tech. I
would suggest you work with your company's legal department to employ the
same or similar agreements that are doubtless in place already for other
consulting relationships between your company & various key-opinion-leader
types.

Cheers,
Liz

-----Original Message-----
From: Dan Saffer [mailto:dan at odannyboy.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 03, 2007 8:35 AM
To: IxDA list
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Incentives in medical domain

On May 3, 2007, at 6:51 AM, Maral Haar wrote:

> I work at a company who develops medical devices. There are strict
> regulations concerning bribary in this domain. Becuase of that my boss
> is very concerned about giving incentives to nurses or doctors who
> participate in an usability test or a focus group or something
> similar.

Bribery is when you get a gift for nothing or the (unspoken) promise
of a later favor. Incentives for research participation aren't that
at all: they are instead about paying people for their participation
in your study, not for some possible favor. Medical professionals are
no different from other professionals in that their time is valuable,
as are their insights into your project. You are paying them for
their subject area expertise. It is standard practice and outlined in
the IRB:

http://www.fda.gov/oc/ohrt/irbs/toc4.html#payment

The legal issues are, as I understand them, around medical staff
accepting gifts from pharmaceutical companies/sales reps in return
for their prescribing their products.

Dan

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