Excellent Portfolios for IxDs(also:do employerscare about portfolios?)

6 Apr 2007 - 5:59am
7 years ago
3 replies
338 reads
Christopher Fahey
2005

> I can't see that maintaining a "professional
> website" should be a priority for an interaction
> designer who is looking for a job. I think that
> would be a bad advice to give to job seekers.

It doesn't have to be a *great* website. Any old website will do. A HTML
1.0 site with black text and some blue links. A Basecamp account. A
MySpace page. A livejournal. Anything. Show me that you are an actual
participant in the fabulous new "Internet Age" and not still living in
some alternate universe where the web never happened.

Look, it seems like half of the teenagers in the world have their own
websites these days. The least I think an employer can expect is for a
technology professional to have the skills and the initiative of a
normal untrained teenager.

You know, the more I think about it the more I agree with PeterMe. I am
now drawing the line, too: No website, no IA job.

-Cf

Christopher Fahey
____________________________
Behavior
http://www.behaviordesign.com
me: http://www.graphpaper.com

Comments

6 Apr 2007 - 7:19am
Vishal Subraman...
2005

>It doesn't have to be a *great* website. Any old website will do. A HTML
> 1.0 site with black text and some blue links.

Precisely. Use wordpress, blogger (wordpress has the ability to create
pages, hence can act as a CMS)....use an existing theme template. Can't get
easier than that.

On 4/6/07, Christopher Fahey <chris.fahey at behaviordesign.com> wrote:
>
> > I can't see that maintaining a "professional
> > website" should be a priority for an interaction
> > designer who is looking for a job. I think that
> > would be a bad advice to give to job seekers.
>
> It doesn't have to be a *great* website. Any old website will do. A HTML
> 1.0 site with black text and some blue links. A Basecamp account. A
> MySpace page. A livejournal. Anything. Show me that you are an actual
> participant in the fabulous new "Internet Age" and not still living in
> some alternate universe where the web never happened.
>
> Look, it seems like half of the teenagers in the world have their own
> websites these days. The least I think an employer can expect is for a
> technology professional to have the skills and the initiative of a
> normal untrained teenager.
>
> You know, the more I think about it the more I agree with PeterMe. I am
> now drawing the line, too: No website, no IA job.
>
> -Cf
>
> Christopher Fahey
> ____________________________
> Behavior
> http://www.behaviordesign.com
> me: http://www.graphpaper.com
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
-Vishal
http://www.vishaliyer.com

6 Apr 2007 - 2:06pm
Mary Austin-Keller
2007

Another thought - if I'm taking the time to maintain a good portfolio site
(context, story, process as has been discussed), then chances are I'm
actively looking. However, on another thread about jobs, it appeared many
of us are not actively looking, but more passively looking - "keeping an eye
out", if you will.

If you require a portfolio just to get in the door, you may be ignoring a
lot of good people that are "happy enough" where they are to not be actively
looking.

Cheers,
~Mary
--
Mary Austin-Keller

On 4/6/07 7:59 AM, "Christopher Fahey" <chris.fahey at behaviordesign.com>
wrote:

>> I can't see that maintaining a "professional
>> website" should be a priority for an interaction
>> designer who is looking for a job. I think that
>> would be a bad advice to give to job seekers.
>
> It doesn't have to be a *great* website. Any old website will do. A HTML
> 1.0 site with black text and some blue links. A Basecamp account. A
> MySpace page. A livejournal. Anything. Show me that you are an actual
> participant in the fabulous new "Internet Age" and not still living in
> some alternate universe where the web never happened.
>
> Look, it seems like half of the teenagers in the world have their own
> websites these days. The least I think an employer can expect is for a
> technology professional to have the skills and the initiative of a
> normal untrained teenager.
>
> You know, the more I think about it the more I agree with PeterMe. I am
> now drawing the line, too: No website, no IA job.

6 Apr 2007 - 2:34pm
bryan.haggerty ...
2005

It kind of goes back to the cobbler's children having no shoes. I
often find that the better designers are the ones who don't have the
time to produce extremely fancy and interactive portfolio sites or
have surprisingly really sparse sites; they don't need to sell
themselves.

So there are 3 types of people right:
1) The well known designer who often has good connections or people
know their work.
2) Fresh out of school types who've got the time and are relying on a
portfolio of school work as they don't have a lot of company
experience.
3) Everyone else in the middle who as you say is more interested in
designing great things but also into having a life and simply always
on the lookout for something different.

I'll be honest, I put together a portfolio of stuff when I got out of
school and have not touched it since I started to work full time. At
the same time, I'm certainly open to new opportunities that may come
my way.

Bryan Haggerty
User Experience Designer
JPMorgan Chase

Syndicate content Get the feed