New Book: Thoughts on Interaction Design

31 Mar 2007 - 11:27am
7 years ago
3 replies
1076 reads
Jon Kolko [SCAD]
2005

Hi,

I'm pleased to announce the availability of a new book I've written on
Interaction Design entitled "Thoughts on Interaction Design". The book
defines and positions the profession of Interaction Design as a strategic
and intellectual pursuit, focused on the complexities of designing for
behavior.

You may find this book interesting if you are:

- a practitioner, engaged in designing products, systems and services
- a researcher, considering the nature of designing for experience
- a student, learning about the relationships between people and the
designed world

Please visit http://www.thoughtsOnInteraction.com to learn more or to
purchase the book.

Thanks so much for your support,

Jon Kolko
Professor, Industrial & Interaction Design
Savannah College of Art and Design

http://facultypages.scad.edu/~jkolko
AOL IM// jkolkoSCAD

Comments

31 Mar 2007 - 12:37pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Interaction Designers are the shapers of behavior. Interaction
Designers - whether practicing as Usability Engineers, Visual
Interface Designers, or Information Architects - all attempt to
understand and shape human behavior. This is the purpose of the
profession: to change the way people behave.

This is a pretty interesting statement Jon.

For the last 20 years I have practiced design as a facilitator,
either through "story telling" or the "translation" of complex
information. I have to be honest in that I never thought of my role
as a designer being a behavior shaper. In fact, I spend most of my
time managing innovation - either developing new products or
improving existing ones. From a business perspective I think that the
ultimate product is one that provides added value by delivering
capabilities without forcing a change in behavior. Slightly less
"optimal" would be a product that delivers capability at a level of
utility greater than the cost of behavioral change. I suppose I will
have to get a copy of the book...

I look forward to it.

Mark

31 Mar 2007 - 1:14pm
Jon Kolko [SCAD]
2005

Mark,

Thanks for the note - and the book purchase :)

I think of _rational_ behavior as a combination of Goals + Tasks + Operators
+ Inputs + Knowledge. If this is the frame of reference, I feel pretty
confident that we can use design methods and processes to affect positive
change in all of these elements with, perhaps, the exception of goals. A'la
Cooper, goals rarely change as technology advances. I think, when you look
at interaction design problems from a business perspective, you are right:
the desire is to provide a value-producing product that fits the users'
goal. A behavioral change would have to occur, though, in terms of tasks,
operators, inputs and knowledge. I teach my design students to embrace that
change and to approach it from a user-centered standpoint rather than a
technology or aesthetics-centered point of view.

_Irrational_ behavior is a completely different ball of wax, and there's a
section in the book on poetic interaction design. I look forward to hearing
your thoughts on that once you've read it.

Thanks,

Jon Kolko
Professor, Industrial & Interaction Design
Savannah College of Art and Design

http://facultypages.scad.edu/~jkolko
AOL IM// jkolkoSCAD

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mark Schraad [mailto:mschraad at mac.com]
> Sent: Saturday, March 31, 2007 2:38 PM
> To: Jon Kolko [SCAD]
> Cc: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] New Book: Thoughts on Interaction Design
>
> Interaction Designers are the shapers of behavior. Interaction Designers -
whether
> practicing as Usability Engineers, Visual Interface Designers, or
Information Architects
> - all attempt to understand and shape human behavior. This is the purpose
of the
> profession: to change the way people behave.
>
> This is a pretty interesting statement Jon.
>
>
> For the last 20 years I have practiced design as a facilitator, either
through "story
> telling" or the "translation" of complex information. I have to be honest
in that I never
> thought of my role as a designer being a behavior shaper. In fact, I spend
most of my
> time managing innovation - either developing new products or improving
existing
> ones. From a business perspective I think that the ultimate product is one
that
> provides added value by delivering capabilities without forcing a change
in behavior.
> Slightly less "optimal" would be a product that delivers capability at a
level of utility
> greater than the cost of behavioral change. I suppose I will have to get a
copy of the
> book...
>
>
> I look forward to it.
>
>
> Mark
>

4 Apr 2007 - 11:20am
Brad Bonham
2006

Jon,
A colleague of mine and a former student of yours (Daniel Nadeau) just
received his book in the mail, and I plan to order one shortly. The book
is beautiful, and if the presentation of its content is any indication,
I'm sure the content will be beautiful as well.
Thanks for contributing what I think will be an important work in the
emergence of this discipline.

Brad
http://www.bradbonham.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Jon
Kolko [SCAD]
Sent: Saturday, March 31, 2007 3:15 PM
To: 'Mark Schraad'
Cc: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] New Book: Thoughts on Interaction Design

Mark,

Thanks for the note - and the book purchase :)

I think of _rational_ behavior as a combination of Goals + Tasks +
Operators
+ Inputs + Knowledge. If this is the frame of reference, I feel pretty
confident that we can use design methods and processes to affect
positive
change in all of these elements with, perhaps, the exception of goals.
A'la
Cooper, goals rarely change as technology advances. I think, when you
look
at interaction design problems from a business perspective, you are
right:
the desire is to provide a value-producing product that fits the users'
goal. A behavioral change would have to occur, though, in terms of
tasks,
operators, inputs and knowledge. I teach my design students to embrace
that
change and to approach it from a user-centered standpoint rather than a
technology or aesthetics-centered point of view.

_Irrational_ behavior is a completely different ball of wax, and there's
a
section in the book on poetic interaction design. I look forward to
hearing
your thoughts on that once you've read it.

Thanks,

Jon Kolko
Professor, Industrial & Interaction Design
Savannah College of Art and Design

http://facultypages.scad.edu/~jkolko
AOL IM// jkolkoSCAD

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