The duration of emotional design

7 Mar 2007 - 10:39am
7 years ago
5 replies
1247 reads
jayeffvee
2007

Hmm...<<temporary comfort>>...that's gotten me back on a topic that I've
been turning over in my mind for some time now: what is, and how to test
for, emotional response to an interface over *time*...

A group I was working with recently wanted to slow down the login page
to their site with a giant photo of a smiling woman. "We want our
login page to be more friendly," they explained.

I told them that not only was loading speed more important to their
users, but that the photo would lose impact over time...which was what
my gut told me: people would ignore it, or they would begin to see it
differently...and the woman in the photo had an ambiguous corporate
smile -- tightness around the mouth, smile not reflected in the eyes...

This was just an image, but of course I'm even more curious about
emotional response to interactions, and IA, and persistent visuals like
curved corner "chrome" on a web based app...

Anyone else have thoughts they'd want to share about emotional responses
to design over time?

I think we often make interfaces to engage -- that is, entangle -- our
users, and we often test users emotional responses before we launch
things...but do we continue to test that emotional response over time?
Anyone do that and/or have any materials on that?

Thanks!

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
David Malouf
Sent: Wednesday, March 07, 2007 9:54 AM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Affordances in interface design

Mark are you agreeing or disagreeing?

One problem with literal artifacts is that often they lead to visual
distractions. so while they add temporary comfort, they do make the UI
less legible.

-- dave

On 3/7/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
>
> On Mar 7, 2007, at 6:44 AM, David Malouf wrote:
>
>
> I would more simply answer your question that a spreadsheet tool
>
> doesn't need to look like a ledger, a bill pay too doesn't need to
>
> look like a checkbook, etc. In fact, I would stay clear from literal
>
> interfaces. They usually break down when you bring them over to the
>
> virtual.
> Literal artifacts are typically embedded into the users schema. In
order to
> overcome the comfort and ease that artifact may provide you must
deliver
> something in return to provide value. Hopefully, the transition to a
new
> medium (in this case digital or remote) provides value to the user,
and not
> just the other stake holders. That value can be an easier process, a
quicker
> process, better results - or even the fact that they get to keep their
job.
> You will need to get rid of that artifact eventually - why not figure
that
> out now?
>
> Mark

--
David Malouf
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixda.org/
http://motorola.com/
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

Comments

7 Mar 2007 - 11:04am
Dave Malouf
2005

Testing this is all about the length of your design, validation,
production lifecycles.
A good beta period is useful for this. If you can get users to dive
into a product for a month or so (maybe even as little as a week, but
really using it) you can survey and otherwise validate some of these
issues. But a usability lab by its very nature is not a good place for
discovering success or failure in this area.

I also think that as designers we need to trust our gut a bit more.
Serendipity is an important part of the design process and not
everything can be validated, or should be, IMHO.

On 3/7/07, Vermette, Joan <Joan.Vermette at fmr.com> wrote:
> Hmm...<<temporary comfort>>...that's gotten me back on a topic that I've
> been turning over in my mind for some time now: what is, and how to test
> for, emotional response to an interface over *time*...
>
> A group I was working with recently wanted to slow down the login page
> to their site with a giant photo of a smiling woman. "We want our
> login page to be more friendly," they explained.
>
> I told them that not only was loading speed more important to their
> users, but that the photo would lose impact over time...which was what
> my gut told me: people would ignore it, or they would begin to see it
> differently...and the woman in the photo had an ambiguous corporate
> smile -- tightness around the mouth, smile not reflected in the eyes...
>
> This was just an image, but of course I'm even more curious about
> emotional response to interactions, and IA, and persistent visuals like
> curved corner "chrome" on a web based app...
>
> Anyone else have thoughts they'd want to share about emotional responses
> to design over time?
>
> I think we often make interfaces to engage -- that is, entangle -- our
> users, and we often test users emotional responses before we launch
> things...but do we continue to test that emotional response over time?
> Anyone do that and/or have any materials on that?
>
> Thanks!
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
> David Malouf
> Sent: Wednesday, March 07, 2007 9:54 AM
> To: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Affordances in interface design
>
> Mark are you agreeing or disagreeing?
>
> One problem with literal artifacts is that often they lead to visual
> distractions. so while they add temporary comfort, they do make the UI
> less legible.
>
> -- dave
>
>
> On 3/7/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> >
> >
> > On Mar 7, 2007, at 6:44 AM, David Malouf wrote:
> >
> >
> > I would more simply answer your question that a spreadsheet tool
> >
> > doesn't need to look like a ledger, a bill pay too doesn't need to
> >
> > look like a checkbook, etc. In fact, I would stay clear from literal
> >
> > interfaces. They usually break down when you bring them over to the
> >
> > virtual.
> > Literal artifacts are typically embedded into the users schema. In
> order to
> > overcome the comfort and ease that artifact may provide you must
> deliver
> > something in return to provide value. Hopefully, the transition to a
> new
> > medium (in this case digital or remote) provides value to the user,
> and not
> > just the other stake holders. That value can be an easier process, a
> quicker
> > process, better results - or even the fact that they get to keep their
> job.
> > You will need to get rid of that artifact eventually - why not figure
> that
> > out now?
> >
> > Mark
>
>
> --
> David Malouf
> http://synapticburn.com/
> http://ixda.org/
> http://motorola.com/
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>
>

--
David Malouf
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixda.org/
http://motorola.com/

7 Mar 2007 - 11:57am
.pauric
2006

The emotions your stakeholders hope to solicit from an image of a friendly
face have been shown to work in other medium such as print e.g. marketing
collateral. Do they work over time? I agree with your gut feeling that the
answer is no and may go as far as to have a long term detrimental effect if
not actively managed. The same image weeks later could be viewed as
impersonal, automatic, a superficial attempt to connect. This in the end
may lead to users resenting something not that far from an ad, an attempt to
built an emotional connection that has no real substance.

Take for example the Bloglines plumber <
http://pof.eslack.org/archives/images/bloglines-plumber.png> initially I
thought this a nice touch, a little bit of humour at what is an everyday
fact of life, I understood and felt no negative emotion against lack of
access to the service.

However it quickly got old. Staring at the same plumber with shoes shinier
than you'd find on a five star general, hands than havent seen a days work.
This message quickly turning in to nothing more than a 'temporarily out of
service' message but with the additional negative of 'lets try to make light
of the situation with our tired old image'.

Things may be different if the image is regularily updated. If you
stakeholders want this image they should commit resource to updating it

Ask your stakeholders if they'd appreciate a generic face beside their
google search box.
'Food' for thought: the KFC Logo. I think if you went way back on the
'uncanny valley' graph you might end up with something that will last a
little longer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncanny_Valley

7 Mar 2007 - 12:06pm
Brian Heumann
2007

Hi there,

it might be a bit off topic, but I remember that Brenda Laurel wrote
a book called "Computers as theatre". She compared a session at the
computer with a drama and its curve of engagement: beginning, climax
and end. (I think she comes from this background.)

What you propose would be some sort of the same but with the whole
lifecylce of a product: install, learn, use, improve/customize etc.
and finally dispose. Perhaps somebody with marketing or branding
background has some information on this.

Kind regards, Brian.

On 07.03.2007, at 16:39, Vermette, Joan wrote:

> Hmm...<<temporary comfort>>...that's gotten me back on a topic that
> I've
> been turning over in my mind for some time now: what is, and how to
> test
> for, emotional response to an interface over *time*...
>
> A group I was working with recently wanted to slow down the login page
> to their site with a giant photo of a smiling woman. "We want our
> login page to be more friendly," they explained.
>
> I told them that not only was loading speed more important to their
> users, but that the photo would lose impact over time...which was what
> my gut told me: people would ignore it, or they would begin to see it
> differently...and the woman in the photo had an ambiguous corporate
> smile -- tightness around the mouth, smile not reflected in the
> eyes...
>
> This was just an image, but of course I'm even more curious about
> emotional response to interactions, and IA, and persistent visuals
> like
> curved corner "chrome" on a web based app...
>
> Anyone else have thoughts they'd want to share about emotional
> responses
> to design over time?
>
> I think we often make interfaces to engage -- that is, entangle -- our
> users, and we often test users emotional responses before we launch
> things...but do we continue to test that emotional response over time?
> Anyone do that and/or have any materials on that?
>
> Thanks!

12 Mar 2007 - 8:55am
Chris Whelan
2004

Joan, you might find some good stuff related to
measuring emotion here:

http://studiolab.io.tudelft.nl/desmet/

Pieter Desmet is an Assistant Professor in the
Department of Industrial Design, and his research for
his PhD degree focused on emotional product
experience. Don Norman wrote a positive review of
Desmet's work.

--- Brian Heumann <brian.heumann at gmx.de> wrote:

> Hi there,
>
> it might be a bit off topic, but I remember that
> Brenda Laurel wrote
> a book called "Computers as theatre". She compared a
> session at the
> computer with a drama and its curve of engagement:
> beginning, climax
> and end. (I think she comes from this background.)
>
> What you propose would be some sort of the same but
> with the whole
> lifecylce of a product: install, learn, use,
> improve/customize etc.
> and finally dispose. Perhaps somebody with
> marketing or branding
> background has some information on this.
>
> Kind regards, Brian.
>
>
>
> On 07.03.2007, at 16:39, Vermette, Joan wrote:
>
>
> > Hmm...<<temporary comfort>>...that's gotten me
> back on a topic that
> > I've
> > been turning over in my mind for some time now:
> what is, and how to
> > test
> > for, emotional response to an interface over
> *time*...
> >
> > A group I was working with recently wanted to slow
> down the login page
> > to their site with a giant photo of a smiling
> woman. "We want our
> > login page to be more friendly," they explained.
> >
> > I told them that not only was loading speed more
> important to their
> > users, but that the photo would lose impact over
> time...which was what
> > my gut told me: people would ignore it, or they
> would begin to see it
> > differently...and the woman in the photo had an
> ambiguous corporate
> > smile -- tightness around the mouth, smile not
> reflected in the
> > eyes...
> >
> > This was just an image, but of course I'm even
> more curious about
> > emotional response to interactions, and IA, and
> persistent visuals
> > like
> > curved corner "chrome" on a web based app...
> >
> > Anyone else have thoughts they'd want to share
> about emotional
> > responses
> > to design over time?
> >
> > I think we often make interfaces to engage -- that
> is, entangle -- our
> > users, and we often test users emotional responses
> before we launch
> > things...but do we continue to test that emotional
> response over time?
> > Anyone do that and/or have any materials on that?
> >
> > Thanks!
>
>
________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association
> (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............
> http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help ..................
> http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ...
> http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List .........
> http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ...........
> http://resources.ixda.org
>

____________________________________________________________________________________
Finding fabulous fares is fun.
Let Yahoo! FareChase search your favorite travel sites to find flight and hotel bargains.
http://farechase.yahoo.com/promo-generic-14795097

12 Mar 2007 - 5:02pm
Marco van Hout
2007

Hi,

I am glad that Pieter Desmet's research was mentioned. This is a great
starting point in emotion measurement related to design.

I am currently involved in the development of an emotion measurement tool
related to interaction: the LEMTool (Layered Emotion Measurement Tool) uses
a combined dimensional approach with discrete emotions. Pieter's measurement
tool asks users to evaluate 14 discrete emotions, which is often found very
hard to do by participants in the experiment. Therefore, in the LEMTool, we
let them first indicate how (not) pleasurable and (not) stimulating they
found the stimulus. After that, participants are presented with a list of
discrete emotions that fits their answer to the dimensions. This way, the
obstacle of having to evaluate negative emotions when you already know you
are feeling positive about the stimulus, is avoided.

Well, there is a lot more to explain, but I recommend everybody to have a
look at:

- My weblog 'design & emotion' for general info and interviews with leading
experts on the topic: www.design-emotion.com
- The weblog that is maintained by the Master student Kevin Capota, who is
involved in developing the LEMTool: www.design-emotion.com/lemtool

And, become a member of the Design & Emotion Society, where I am responsible
for the ENGAGE project (Tools and Methods to design for emotion):
www.designandemotion.org

Hope this helps!

Marco van Hout

Syndicate content Get the feed