more new desktop IxD

1 Mar 2007 - 3:58pm
7 years ago
7 replies
520 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

What do people think of the new interface on the $100 laptop?

Business Week's article has a slideshow and other interesting commentary.
http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/mar2007/id20070301_063165.htm

Not your ordinary desktop.

Amazing internationalization issues are covered with this IxD setup.

-- dave

--
David Malouf
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixda.org/
http://motorola.com/

Comments

1 Mar 2007 - 4:24pm
.pauric
2006

"Not your ordinary desktop."

I'm sure thats a slip, but its not a 'desktop' interface. Its a focused ACD
design. Do one thing and do it well - so barring any glaring
design-by-committee no-no's it should be more user friendly than a tub of
ben and jerrys.

However, read somewhere today that some countries, who are rightly concerned
about theft-blackmarket, have got the design changed so it will disable
itself in some circumstances. Firstly the device must be registered over
the net within a period, then if reported stolen it gets disabled from a
central server.

While this is all well and good it falls in to design flaw of not trusting
the user, you're guilty until you prove yourself innocent. And, with a lot
of the target countries having less than stellar access to the net I think
there are going to be a lot of peeved kiddies with green/white bricks.
Also, I have to question the possible disconnect between the bureaucrats who
requested this feature and the capabilities of these countries to manually
administer lists of stolen serial numbers and then broadcast licensing
flags.

fwiw there are no current plans to sell this in western markets.

1 Mar 2007 - 4:48pm
Greg Petroff
2004

Did you notice the xo man? Uncanny simularity to ixda.org logo.

--gp

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
David Malouf
Sent: Thursday, Mar 01, 2007 12:59 PM
To: IxDA Discuss
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] more new desktop IxD

What do people think of the new interface on the $100 laptop?

Business Week's article has a slideshow and other interesting
commentary.
http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/mar2007/id20070301_063165.h
tm

Not your ordinary desktop.

Amazing internationalization issues are covered with this IxD setup.

-- dave

--
David Malouf
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixda.org/
http://motorola.com/
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1 Mar 2007 - 4:54pm
dmitryn
2004

It's too bad the slideshow has no screenshots of actual applications
running within Sugar. The desktop (or should that be circletop?) UI is
very cool, but I'd be even more interested in seeing how the designers
adapted the web browser, IM client, etc. for the constraints of this
audience and context.

Dmitry

On 3/1/07, David Malouf <dave at ixda.org> wrote:
> What do people think of the new interface on the $100 laptop?
>
> Business Week's article has a slideshow and other interesting commentary.
> http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/mar2007/id20070301_063165.htm
>
> Not your ordinary desktop.
>
> Amazing internationalization issues are covered with this IxD setup.
>
> -- dave
>
> --
> David Malouf
> http://synapticburn.com/
> http://ixda.org/
> http://motorola.com/
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

1 Mar 2007 - 4:41pm
Matt Theakston
2007

jacob nielsons comment "outright reckless" is interesting regarding the
research and user testing. It makes me think of the parallel with the
motofone. I had listened to richard schatzberger talk about the amount
of research for motofone at the world usability day here in chicago last
year. seems to me that designing a device for developing countries would
require more testing and research than usual. Seems a little scary a load of
MIT people making assumptions about young kids needs in distant countries,
but perhaps more research was completed than described in that article(or
maybe not). A brave bit of work nonetheless though.

i'm new posting by the way, although have been reading the discussions for a
little while! So hello all.

Matt

On 3/1/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> "Not your ordinary desktop."
>
> I'm sure thats a slip, but its not a 'desktop' interface. Its a focused
> ACD
> design. Do one thing and do it well - so barring any glaring
> design-by-committee no-no's it should be more user friendly than a tub of
> ben and jerrys.
>
> However, read somewhere today that some countries, who are rightly
> concerned
> about theft-blackmarket, have got the design changed so it will disable
> itself in some circumstances. Firstly the device must be registered over
> the net within a period, then if reported stolen it gets disabled from a
> central server.
>
> While this is all well and good it falls in to design flaw of not trusting
> the user, you're guilty until you prove yourself innocent. And, with a
> lot
> of the target countries having less than stellar access to the net I think
> there are going to be a lot of peeved kiddies with green/white bricks.
> Also, I have to question the possible disconnect between the bureaucrats
> who
> requested this feature and the capabilities of these countries to manually
> administer lists of stolen serial numbers and then broadcast licensing
> flags.
>
> fwiw there are no current plans to sell this in western markets.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

1 Mar 2007 - 8:50pm
.pauric
2006

Its going in to the hands of kids, who are information sponges, in places
where a 386 with DOS is alien technology. I understand the guys at Squid
Labs were asked to develop a charger for it, consists of a piece of rope
that wraps round a dymo. You put your foot on the dymo and push-pull the
rope to generate current.

I'm not being an apologist for bad design practices but any critism of the
UI is probably based on developed world standards. I doubt the engineers at
MIT will be fielding many support calls from irrate children in sub saharn
africa complaining about IM compatibility or browser plugins.

1 Mar 2007 - 9:00pm
Kevin Wong
2007

When developing for "southern" countries, wouldn't it be more
appropriate to do more ethnographic studies and see what the actual
behaviors are when integrating technology into their lifestyle? As
designers, for the most part, we work in environments that support
advanced computing technology. Do we really _know_ the interactions
in these kinds of environments? The thought of doing it "like Steve
Jobs" for such a large population with an entirely new (somewhat
tested?) GUI for children is... bold.

I'm also curious if they considered some kind of technology probe to
just observe the behavioral impact of technology within their
environment?

This article reminded me of an entry by Jan Chipchase (http://
www.janchipchase.com/sharedphoneuse) and it was amazing how different
mobile phones were used. Can we expect these children to use this
laptop like we do? Granted the economical constraints influenced this
pattern of usage, isn't the XO laptop placed in the same boat? Maybe
we can learn something about this.

Btw, I thought they took out the hand crank because they were afraid
children wouldn't be able to generate enough torque to generate
sufficient power over prolonged period of time.

And lastly, there's this video of the xo machine in action for those
curious: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwzCsOFxT-U&mode=related&search=

Just some thoughts..

-Kevin

On Mar 1, 2007, at 1:41 PM, Matt Theakston wrote:

> jacob nielsons comment "outright reckless" is interesting regarding
> the
> research and user testing. It makes me think of the parallel with the
> motofone. I had listened to richard schatzberger talk about the amount
> of research for motofone at the world usability day here in chicago
> last
> year. seems to me that designing a device for developing countries
> would
> require more testing and research than usual. Seems a little scary
> a load of
> MIT people making assumptions about young kids needs in distant
> countries,
> but perhaps more research was completed than described in that
> article(or
> maybe not). A brave bit of work nonetheless though.
>
> i'm new posting by the way, although have been reading the
> discussions for a
> little while! So hello all.
>
> Matt
>
>
> On 3/1/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> "Not your ordinary desktop."
>>
>> I'm sure thats a slip, but its not a 'desktop' interface. Its a
>> focused
>> ACD
>> design. Do one thing and do it well - so barring any glaring
>> design-by-committee no-no's it should be more user friendly than a
>> tub of
>> ben and jerrys.
>>
>> However, read somewhere today that some countries, who are rightly
>> concerned
>> about theft-blackmarket, have got the design changed so it will
>> disable
>> itself in some circumstances. Firstly the device must be
>> registered over
>> the net within a period, then if reported stolen it gets disabled
>> from a
>> central server.
>>
>> While this is all well and good it falls in to design flaw of not
>> trusting
>> the user, you're guilty until you prove yourself innocent. And,
>> with a
>> lot
>> of the target countries having less than stellar access to the net
>> I think
>> there are going to be a lot of peeved kiddies with green/white
>> bricks.
>> Also, I have to question the possible disconnect between the
>> bureaucrats
>> who
>> requested this feature and the capabilities of these countries to
>> manually
>> administer lists of stolen serial numbers and then broadcast
>> licensing
>> flags.
>>
>> fwiw there are no current plans to sell this in western markets.
>> ________________________________________________________________

Kevin Wong Student IxDesigner at UW Informatics - kvwong.com/blog
contact | kevinwong at kvwong.com - 425.894.9211 aim | kdubz313

2 Mar 2007 - 8:19am
Gil Barros
2006

I saw some children playing with the OLPC for a little while and then talked to
them about it. I also got to play a little with it myself ;-)

The general impression is very good, but it's still a beta version and there are
a lot of implementation issues that need to be solved. For example, the touchpad
was too sensitive, which made it very hard to control the pointer (kids were
using a USB mouse). Also, the screen is 200 DPI, which made the pointer (Linux
default) very small and sometimes hard to find on the screen. Response time was
an issue also.

The kids I talked to had some familiarity with Windows computers, and at first
thought the UI was strange, but got used to it _very_ fast and some of them even
said that the OLPC UI was easier than "the other" computer. The activities were
very simple, though, most of the time kids were looking things on the web and
showing it to each other.

The Sugar UI seems very interesting, I'm glad that the Desktop approach was left
behind and I see a great effort in trying to build a new paradigm that's better
suited for the OLPC purpose (kids doing things together). Here are the UI
Guidelines:
<http://wiki.laptop.org/go/OLPC_Human_Interface_Guidelines>

I think the main challenge is how to make it work in combination with the
Desktop. All the icons and widgets are very nice and consistent up until you
open an contextual menu or an Open dialog box, which looks very Motif-like.

Still, I'm very positive about it, specially because it's a "second" UI that
kids will work on. It gives another perspective when you know that things don't
have to be like the Desktop, it allows comparison. It's so common to see
"computer classes" here in Brazil being focused on just teaching kids how to use
Windows, Word and Excel as black boxes. Something that Nielsen just mentioned in
his alerbox, by the way.
<http://www.useit.com/alertbox/computer-skills.html>

And whether the OLPC will "work" or not, well, that's a whole other story. The
machine plays a big part, but as in any other big project it's just one of the
factors. How will teachers be prepared? Distribution, robbery, control, those
issues are still open. And I leave those debates for other lists.

Gil.

David Malouf escreveu (01.03.07 17:58):
> What do people think of the new interface on the $100 laptop?
>
> Business Week's article has a slideshow and other interesting commentary.
> http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/mar2007/id20070301_063165.htm
>
> Not your ordinary desktop.
>
> Amazing internationalization issues are covered with this IxD setup.
>
> -- dave
>

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