designing for "everyone" (was: no subject)

25 Jan 2007 - 2:36pm
7 years ago
2 replies
240 reads
Josh Seiden
2003

The point of my example is that by designing well for one person, you serve
the needs of other people with similar needs. It is often the case that the
size of the needs-sharing population can be so large as to approach
"everyone."

And in terms of this relates to marketing and market segmentation, by
defining your population in terms of "need-sharing", you tend to transcend
traditional demographic segmentation.

JS

On 1/25/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com > wrote:
>
> And yet not every flier has one or uses one. It is not an issue of
> economics... so why, if this addresses the need of "everyone" who flies by
> plane, is it not universal?
>
>
> >Classic example: the roll-aboard suitcase was designed for a flight
> >attendant: but that person represents the needs of "everyone" who travels
> by
> >plane.
>
>

Comments

25 Jan 2007 - 3:07pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Joshua,

I totally buy into the idea that if you design for innovators or heavy demand users (sometimes called power users) that some of those same features will trickle down to the average or everyday users. Sometimes - even changing existing scemas and behaviors. Maybe the issue is one of language and that "everyone" is being used where "anyone" is reeally meant.

Mark

>The point of my example is that by designing well for one person, you serve
>the needs of other people with similar needs. It is often the case that the
>size of the needs-sharing population can be so large as to approach
>"everyone."
>
>And in terms of this relates to marketing and market segmentation, by
>defining your population in terms of "need-sharing", you tend to transcend
>traditional demographic segmentation.
>
>JS
>
>On 1/25/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com > wrote:
>>
>> And yet not every flier has one or uses one. It is not an issue of
>> economics... so why, if this addresses the need of "everyone" who flies by
>> plane, is it not universal?
>>
>>
>> >Classic example: the roll-aboard suitcase was designed for a flight
>> >attendant: but that person represents the needs of "everyone" who travels
>> by
>> >plane.

25 Jan 2007 - 10:17pm
Josh Seiden
2003

I'm not really talking about innovators or power users or any particular
user profile. I'm talking about a technique to build a product with one
coherent feature set. The risk of designing for everyone is that you be able
to create a coherent feature set, because your design has no center, no
spine. You'l have 100-proof, chipotle-flavored baby food. The solution is to
find a method to avoid this.

My argument is only that when you create a product with a coherent feature
set, you create a powerful design. And that feature set can be created by
focussing on someone who is an outlier in demographic terms. THe key is that
this person must exemplify a behavioral pattern shared by others --even
those in very very different demographic groups.

JS

On 1/25/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
>
> Joshua,
>
> I totally buy into the idea that if you design for innovators or heavy
> demand users (sometimes called power users) that some of those same features
> will trickle down to the average or everyday users. Sometimes - even
> changing existing scemas and behaviors. Maybe the issue is one of language
> and that "everyone" is being used where "anyone" is reeally meant.
>
> Mark
>
>
> >The point of my example is that by designing well for one person, you
> serve
> >the needs of other people with similar needs. It is often the case that
> the
> >size of the needs-sharing population can be so large as to approach
> >"everyone."
> >
> >And in terms of this relates to marketing and market segmentation, by
> >defining your population in terms of "need-sharing", you tend to
> transcend
> >traditional demographic segmentation.
> >
> >JS
> >
> >On 1/25/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com > wrote:
> >>
> >> And yet not every flier has one or uses one. It is not an issue of
> >> economics... so why, if this addresses the need of "everyone" who flies
> by
> >> plane, is it not universal?
> >>
> >>
> >> >Classic example: the roll-aboard suitcase was designed for a flight
> >> >attendant: but that person represents the needs of "everyone" who
> travels
> >> by
> >> >plane.
>
>

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