Where has the music gone?

23 Jan 2007 - 10:20pm
7 years ago
29 replies
682 reads
Daniel Williams
2005

I remember in the early days (pre web 1.0 and well before the birth of the
blog) that a lot of people coded (or at least used a WYSIWYG HTML
editor) small personal websites that contained huge lists of all theire
favourite things from films to trivial facts and not much else. One
thing however that does stick in my mind from those days is that people
often attached a sample of their favourite music track or sound bite as a
background sound to their homepage (and this was in the days of dial up
connections!). *where has this music gone?*

The effects of music on people's mood is well documented and studies have
even showed how music can influence peoples purchasing decisions. Every time
I go into a shop I hear music, music specifically selected to influence my
mood. *Where has this gone on the web?* We have broadband now!

OK so I am not talking about a couple of polyphonic sounding effects, I am
talking about going onto Amazon and hearing streaming tracks in the
background just as if I were in a CD store. *Any thoughts? *
**
**

Comments

23 Jan 2007 - 11:46pm
Josh
2006

Dan,

The music is on Myspace.

As for music around the Web during your shopping experience etc... I think
we ran smack into some interesting use cases that kinda killed it. Also note
that it might have been seriously wounded with the end of the Flash 4 Splash
Page.

1. Not everyone browses from a place where they can listen to music or even
hear audio. Imagine the receptionist at a law firm browsing the Web for some
new cd's. Now imagine that same receptionist being fired when Fergie's new
track comes on and the managing partner is walking by.

2. There really aren't that many reliable ways to get music to play in the
background of a user's experience if it is taking place over multiple pages,
unless you want to wrap the whole thing in Flash. Maybe with Web 2.0 "AJAX"
stuff we might be able to create a completely page-less experience that
avoids any refresh so the music can keep playing.

3. Music on sites isn't accessible, so audio probably shouldn't be used as a
primary means to convey a message.

4. I'm not sure but is the <embed> tag valid anymore?

When I finally create my blog. It will have music.

- Josh Viney

23 Jan 2007 - 11:22pm
Paul Robare
2007

I have often wondered about his myself Dan. The conventional wisdom that sound on the web is 'irritating' no longer need apply. Bad MIDI tunes embedded in pages are certainly best left forgotten, but we have certainly progressed beyond those days technologically. We are surrounded by music in many things we do and places we go, but perhaps we've gotten used to a silent web and aren't interested in music in that context anymore. It's easy to tune out ambient music you don't like in a clothing store, but not so simple to do when the sounds are coming from your computer - would visitors stand for a commercial website that played music they didn't like, as shoppers in a mall will?

Personally, I would be happy to see more music on the web, but I don't think it's very likely until the web itself changes from its current form.

Paul Robare

____________________________________________________________________________________
Don't get soaked. Take a quick peak at the forecast
with the Yahoo! Search weather shortcut.
http://tools.search.yahoo.com/shortcuts/#loc_weather

24 Jan 2007 - 12:32am
Brian Forte
2004

Dan,

>The effects of music on people's mood is well documented and studies have
>even showed how music can influence peoples purchasing decisions. Every time
>I go into a shop I hear music, music specifically selected to influence my
>mood. *Where has this gone on the web?* We have broadband now!

The first thing I do if I encounter a web-site that wants to make
noise is turn the sound on my computer down.

The second thing I do is make a mental note not to go back to that site.

I have music playing on my own speakers when I'm working. The last
thing I want when web-surfing is a stranger presuming their noise is
more important than the noise I'm already listening to.

Also, one of the reasons I don't like going in to shops is the awful
noise most of them insist on making.

At least my local supermarket just plays a local FM radio station. I
may not love 20-year-old top-40 pop music but it's a step up from the
muzak and worse smaller stores insist on playing.

Let's not encourage web vendors to emulate their physical-world cousins.

Regards,

Brian Forte.
--
words, edits, type, layout, code
<mailto:bforte at betweenborders.com>
<http://betweenborders.com/>

24 Jan 2007 - 9:14am
.pauric
2006

I feel the fundamental issue with sound is control.

If you want some piece and quiet or you are listening to your music while
surfing - you are in control.

Now if a site wants to create some brand ambiance, you take away control of
the environment from the user.

I think the analogy of music while shopping is faulted. You have
relinquished control of your space when you enter the shop's 'experience'
environment. The same cannot be said for when you are sat in front of your
computer in your space. Additionally, when you enter a shop you are on a
path. Surfing is very different, people pause, get distracted, grab a
coffee, etc. You cant implant a continuous stream of audio with the aim of
creating ambiance when the user is not always going to give 100% attention
to that stream.

No amount of good design, unobtrusive ambient brand building or anything
else will change the fact that users expect full control of their surfing
experience. And as noted, once you try to manipulate the user's space they
will surf somewhere else.

24 Jan 2007 - 9:54am
.pauric
2006

Generally, I would rather run last.fm or pandora in another tab than go to
the effort of personalizing a specific site.

There are such excellent choices for listening to music (mp3 players,
personalized sites) why would I go to the effort of personalizing a site I
might not spend the majority of my time on?

Unless it meets a specific user need I would consider this feature creep.

24 Jan 2007 - 11:00am
.pauric
2006

I do not doubt this seems useful, but just to play the devils advocate...
here's my thinking on mp3 download or music label sites;

I generally go to a download site, be that amazon, ambient.us,
ninjatune.netetc after I've heard something on
shoucast/last.fm/pandora or even
www.liveplasma.com

So, I'm searching and listening to samples. I do not expect to be presented
with a barrier to my search. I think you are suggesting a recommendation
system. So if I'm browsing the download site, then yes I could see the
value of suggestions. Personally I would prefer an amazonian 'people who
listened to this also listened to...'

I think this is something thats very easy to implement but very hard to get
right. And if its not 100% on the money I can see how users would easily
fall back to preferred sources and look on the site with less favour. An
example of this feature done well http://musicovery.com

Whats your view on Netflix playing clips of classic National Lampoon films
in a little window to the side by default just because your last rental was
Borat?

regards - pauric

24 Jan 2007 - 11:01am
Dante Murphy
2006

Some great responses to this thread, all pointing out true and
compelling reasons to NOT make music a default part of a site's initial
load. In addition to the BOOMING VOLUME and the low probability that
I'll like what the site owner is playing more than what I'm playing on
iTunes, there is another concern not mirrored in the physical
world...the abject shock of music suddenly coming from nowhere.

When you're in the mall, as you approach that trendy clothing store the
music will begin to swell up from the ambient noise around you. Not so
on the 'net; you just get a bombastic jolt of pop culture gone wrong.

So rather than ask why or why not, here's my vision of the ideal
experience:

1. See if I'm already listening to something else, whether through
iTunes or even if I'm watching TV through my video card. If I am, don't
interrupt.

2. If nothing else is playing, or if I stop playing other audio, then
allow the music to swell up from silence to a MODERATE VOLUME.

3. Always display volume and mute controls. Highlight them when music
starts.

4. Consider offering multiple "channels". Why do I have to hear hip-hop
when I shop for pants? Just because I wear pants doesn't mean this is
my favorite music.

5. Co-market the music, and offer a deal if I want to buy it.

Anyone else have any ideas?

_______________________________________
Dante Murphy | Director of Information Architecture
Medical Broadcasting Company | A D I G I T A S INC. COMPANY

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Dan
Williams
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 10:21 PM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Where has the music gone?

I remember in the early days (pre web 1.0 and well before the birth of
the
blog) that a lot of people coded (or at least used a WYSIWYG HTML
editor) small personal websites that contained huge lists of all theire
favourite things from films to trivial facts and not much else. One
thing however that does stick in my mind from those days is that people
often attached a sample of their favourite music track or sound bite as
a
background sound to their homepage (and this was in the days of dial up
connections!). *where has this music gone?*

The effects of music on people's mood is well documented and studies
have
even showed how music can influence peoples purchasing decisions. Every
time
I go into a shop I hear music, music specifically selected to influence
my
mood. *Where has this gone on the web?* We have broadband now!

OK so I am not talking about a couple of polyphonic sounding effects, I
am
talking about going onto Amazon and hearing streaming tracks in the
background just as if I were in a CD store. *Any thoughts? *
**
**
________________________________________________________________
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24 Jan 2007 - 12:19pm
Lorne Trudeau
2006

Here's a fun game to play: go to myspace and open about 10 random pages
in different tabs of your browser, then try to identify each song and
its source page. Fun!
(The point: multitasking on a computer dramatically effects
"experiential" attributes of web pages)
Lorne

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Dan
Williams
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 7:21 PM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Where has the music gone?

I remember in the early days (pre web 1.0 and well before the birth of
the
blog) that a lot of people coded (or at least used a WYSIWYG HTML
editor) small personal websites that contained huge lists of all theire
favourite things from films to trivial facts and not much else. One
thing however that does stick in my mind from those days is that people
often attached a sample of their favourite music track or sound bite as
a
background sound to their homepage (and this was in the days of dial up
connections!). *where has this music gone?*

The effects of music on people's mood is well documented and studies
have
even showed how music can influence peoples purchasing decisions. Every
time
I go into a shop I hear music, music specifically selected to influence
my
mood. *Where has this gone on the web?* We have broadband now!

OK so I am not talking about a couple of polyphonic sounding effects, I
am
talking about going onto Amazon and hearing streaming tracks in the
background just as if I were in a CD store. *Any thoughts? *
**
**
________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
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24 Jan 2007 - 8:48am
Daniel Williams
2005

Good points.

However, lets take Amazon, when I log on they impose a selection of books
upon me that they think I will like. I think it would be a powerful tool, if
they streamed tracks they think I would like also.

OK, so I'm not talking about actually embedding it in the background of the
page it's self, and the user would have the option to turn off the music
(which they don't have in the mall).

Just a thought.

(Do you know some shops and malls also produce certain smells that people
like such as baking bread..... next on the web ;-) )

On 1/24/07, Brian Forte <bforte at adelaide.on.net> wrote:
>
> Dan,
>
> >The effects of music on people's mood is well documented and studies have
> >even showed how music can influence peoples purchasing decisions. Every
> time
> >I go into a shop I hear music, music specifically selected to influence
> my
> >mood. *Where has this gone on the web?* We have broadband now!
>
> The first thing I do if I encounter a web-site that wants to make
> noise is turn the sound on my computer down.
>
> The second thing I do is make a mental note not to go back to that site.
>
> I have music playing on my own speakers when I'm working. The last
> thing I want when web-surfing is a stranger presuming their noise is
> more important than the noise I'm already listening to.
>
> Also, one of the reasons I don't like going in to shops is the awful
> noise most of them insist on making.
>
> At least my local supermarket just plays a local FM radio station. I
> may not love 20-year-old top-40 pop music but it's a step up from the
> muzak and worse smaller stores insist on playing.
>
> Let's not encourage web vendors to emulate their physical-world cousins.
>
> Regards,
>
> Brian Forte.
> --
> words, edits, type, layout, code
> <mailto:bforte at betweenborders.com>
> <http://betweenborders.com/>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
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>

24 Jan 2007 - 9:33am
Daniel Williams
2005

Sounds like an ideal solution would be for the the site to build a
recommended play list for me (preferably personalised) and then I would have
the option of playing this while I surf the site.

I, the user has control and choice, the site promotes what it wants and can
have some potential influence over my mood.... everyone is a winner!

On 1/24/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I feel the fundamental issue with sound is control.
>
> If you want some piece and quiet or you are listening to your music while
> surfing - you are in control.
>
> Now if a site wants to create some brand ambiance, you take away control
> of
> the environment from the user.
>
> I think the analogy of music while shopping is faulted. You have
> relinquished control of your space when you enter the shop's 'experience'
> environment. The same cannot be said for when you are sat in front of your
> computer in your space. Additionally, when you enter a shop you are on a
> path. Surfing is very different, people pause, get distracted, grab a
> coffee, etc. You cant implant a continuous stream of audio with the aim of
> creating ambiance when the user is not always going to give 100% attention
> to that stream.
>
> No amount of good design, unobtrusive ambient brand building or anything
> else will change the fact that users expect full control of their surfing
> experience. And as noted, once you try to manipulate the user's space they
> will surf somewhere else.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

24 Jan 2007 - 10:09am
Daniel Williams
2005

I can obviously control what music I listen to (Pandora, MP3, I tunes, CD'S,
Radio) but that would be to miss the point.

What about giving the web site (business) some control (if I so wishes) over
what they think I would like to listen to. OK so I go to an online MP3
download site, they automatically stream the top 10 Indie Rock tracks (as
from previous purchasing habits they have noticed this is my favourite
genre). That is completely different from loosing control, that is giving
the user an option to experience something of interest to them while they
carry on browsing the site (and even off site). That stream could also be
branded as the user is likely to move away from the page, or even switch
tabs.

On 1/24/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Generally, I would rather run last.fm or pandora in another tab than go to
> the effort of personalizing a specific site.
>
> There are such excellent choices for listening to music (mp3 players,
> personalized sites) why would I go to the effort of personalizing a site I
> might not spend the majority of my time on?
>
> Unless it meets a specific user need I would consider this feature creep.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
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>

24 Jan 2007 - 11:11am
Tracy Boyington
2007

I'll add number 6... allow me to turn off background music in my
internet settings, just as I might turn off graphics or Javascript.
Because I, for one, don't want to listen to it. At all.

~~~~~
Tracy Boyington tracy_boyington at okcareertech.org
Oklahoma Department of Career & Technology Education
Stillwater, OK http://www.okcareertech.org/cimc

>>> "Dante Murphy" <dmurphy at mbcnet.com> 01/24/07 10:01 AM >>>

So rather than ask why or why not, here's my vision of the ideal
experience:

1. See if I'm already listening to something else, whether through
iTunes or even if I'm watching TV through my video card. If I am,
don't
interrupt.

2. If nothing else is playing, or if I stop playing other audio, then
allow the music to swell up from silence to a MODERATE VOLUME.

3. Always display volume and mute controls. Highlight them when music
starts.

4. Consider offering multiple "channels". Why do I have to hear
hip-hop
when I shop for pants? Just because I wear pants doesn't mean this is
my favorite music.

5. Co-market the music, and offer a deal if I want to buy it.

24 Jan 2007 - 12:50pm
Eric Anderson
2006

Hello,

a background sound to their homepage (and this was in the days of dial up
> connections!). *where has this music gone?*

Lorne's right -- the music has gone to myspace. Finding, testing,
listening, and ultimately adding music to your profile page is something
myspace does relatively well. For example, you can add a new song to your
profile page from the Flash widget playing that song on your friend's
profile. Song rot (artists deleting songs) is an occassional problem -- and
you can only play songs uploaded by "artists" (or pirates calling themselves
artists).

Eric

--
707.495.2500
skype: ericrobertanderson

24 Jan 2007 - 1:25pm
.pauric
2006

Browsing profiles on a social site implies a mindset that is open to
exploring others taste. I do not think there is a comparison with web-site
interaction.

Dan "when I log on they impose a selection of books upon me that they think
I will like. I think it would be a powerful tool, if they streamed tracks
they think I would like also."

Amazon does not open the first page of these books and make you click
through them. You have the option of looking inside, you should have the
option of hearing samples, not a default that can be switched off.

In my humble opinion... theres a reason Amazon, and most any music download
site I can find, does not do this.

24 Jan 2007 - 3:18pm
Daniel Williams
2005

I quite agree about the control feature. Allow me to choose background music
or not. I think too many people assume it will be irritable so that would be
a problem. The only reason I see it to be irritable is if that I had no
control what so ever. Apart from that I would more than welcome the option
(within context.)

On 1/24/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Browsing profiles on a social site implies a mindset that is open to
> exploring others taste. I do not think there is a comparison with
> web-site
> interaction.
>
> Dan "when I log on they impose a selection of books upon me that they
> think
> I will like. I think it would be a powerful tool, if they streamed tracks
> they think I would like also."
>
> Amazon does not open the first page of these books and make you click
> through them. You have the option of looking inside, you should have the
> option of hearing samples, not a default that can be switched off.
>
> In my humble opinion... theres a reason Amazon, and most any music
> download
> site I can find, does not do this.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
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> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
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>

24 Jan 2007 - 3:29pm
Daniel Williams
2005

"Browsing profiles on a social site implies a mindset that is open to
exploring others taste. I do not think there is a comparison with web-site
interaction"

I think this is the same with music. It all depends upon the site. Amazon is
probably a site you go to when you know what you want to buy. However there
are a lot of sites out there who provide features which let you explore
music and find new artists that you otherwise would not know you would like.
When in this mindset of exploration, then the user would be open to
exploring and receiving new ideas.

On 1/24/07, Dan Williams <dgwillia at googlemail.com> wrote:
>
> I quite agree about the control feature. Allow me to choose background
> music or not. I think too many people assume it will be irritable so that
> would be a problem. The only reason I see it to be irritable is if that I
> had no control what so ever. Apart from that I would more than welcome the
> option (within context.)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 1/24/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Browsing profiles on a social site implies a mindset that is open to
> > exploring others taste. I do not think there is a comparison with
> > web-site
> > interaction.
> >
> > Dan "when I log on they impose a selection of books upon me that they
> > think
> > I will like. I think it would be a powerful tool, if they streamed
> > tracks
> > they think I would like also."
> >
> > Amazon does not open the first page of these books and make you click
> > through them. You have the option of looking inside, you should have
> > the
> > option of hearing samples, not a default that can be switched off.
> >
> > In my humble opinion... theres a reason Amazon, and most any music
> > download
> > site I can find, does not do this.
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> > List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> > (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> > Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> > Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> > Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> > Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
> >
>
>

24 Jan 2007 - 3:59pm
.pauric
2006

I tend to agree, but how do you find out in advance which mindset the user
is in? First I should clarify my original statement "Browsing profiles on a
social site implies a mindset that is open to exploring friends taste."

I have an interest in exploring the tastes of someone I have a relationship
with. I want to know more about them, what they like. Does this mindset have
the same criteria as one that is exploring a 3rd party website that contains
content I have no personal relationship with? I would say the first is open
to input, the second is more likely to start excluding sources of
information.

Dan "However there are a lot of sites out there who provide features which
let you explore music and find new artists that you otherwise would not know
you would like."

I think there are two modes in this context.
1) 'Pandora': play me some music I like, let me investigate interesting
tracks as an when you play them. Interactive Radio while you are focused on
something else. Random music based on loosely defined genre tagging (system
side).
2) Download: I might have a particular genre in mind, but I'm open to
suggestions. I'm looking for new music but I know what I like.

In the second case how to you make your assumptions on what the user might
like? Unless of course the site content is specific to a particular music
genre. Lets say its lifestyle content, its a risky assumption to make
suggestions on something akin to a focus group.

For me, the issue it making assumptions. See Word's 'Clippy' RIP.

24 Jan 2007 - 7:15pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

So, wait. For clarification purposes, with this thread, you're:

1) advocating copyright infringement (which I don't necessarily have an
issue with)
2) assuming people aren't already listening to their *own* music while using
their computers (which I definitely have an issue with)
3) forgetting how annoying this was the first-time around

Correct?

:)

-r-

On 1/23/07, Paul Robare <paulrobare at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> I have often wondered about his myself Dan. The conventional wisdom that
> sound on the web is 'irritating' no longer need apply. Bad MIDI tunes
> embedded in pages are certainly best left forgotten, but we have certainly
> progressed beyond those days technologically. We are surrounded by music in
> many things we do and places we go, but perhaps we've gotten used to a
> silent web and aren't interested in music in that context anymore. It's
> easy to tune out ambient music you don't like in a clothing store, but not
> so simple to do when the sounds are coming from your computer - would
> visitors stand for a commercial website that played music they didn't like,
> as shoppers in a mall will?
>
> Personally, I would be happy to see more music on the web, but I don't
> think it's very likely until the web itself changes from its current form.
>
> Paul Robare
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Don't get soaked. Take a quick peak at the forecast
> with the Yahoo! Search weather shortcut.
> http://tools.search.yahoo.com/shortcuts/#loc_weather
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
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>

25 Jan 2007 - 7:47am
Peter Bagnall
2003

Personally I have to agree with #6 too, and all those who hate the
music. But stepping out of myself for a moment I know several people
who find music on websites to be fun and engaging. I suspect (with
nothing more than anecdotal evidence) that it has something to do
with the amount of 'net usage.

I'm online all the time I'm not asleep (to a very close
approximation), so my attitude towards the net is it's a place I work
and find things I need. I want to be able to drive through sites at
speed, and I'm often doing several things at once. Say listening to
the radio, while surfing for information for something else I'm
doing. For information workers I expect that's the norm (and
therefore for most on this list).

But those who I've noticed like music often don't use the web so
much, and still see it as a slightly exciting place where they go to
have fun. When they're online they want to be entertained as much
(maybe more) than anything else. They're also more likely to be
surfing at home, so there's less chance of them suddenly disturbing
other people. Their tolerance for interruption in this way is much
higher.

So maybe that points to what kinds of sites would be wise to avoid
and which might like to use music.

But that said, I still like #6, or maybe a mute button in the
browsers toolbar.

Cheers
--Pete

On 24 Jan 2007, at 16:11, Tracy Boyington wrote:

> I'll add number 6... allow me to turn off background music in my
> internet settings, just as I might turn off graphics or Javascript.
> Because I, for one, don't want to listen to it. At all.
>
> ~~~~~
> Tracy Boyington tracy_boyington at okcareertech.org
> Oklahoma Department of Career & Technology Education
> Stillwater, OK http://www.okcareertech.org/cimc
>
>
>>>> "Dante Murphy" <dmurphy at mbcnet.com> 01/24/07 10:01 AM >>>
>
> So rather than ask why or why not, here's my vision of the ideal
> experience:
>
> 1. See if I'm already listening to something else, whether through
> iTunes or even if I'm watching TV through my video card. If I am,
> don't
> interrupt.
>
> 2. If nothing else is playing, or if I stop playing other audio, then
> allow the music to swell up from silence to a MODERATE VOLUME.
>
> 3. Always display volume and mute controls. Highlight them when music
> starts.
>
> 4. Consider offering multiple "channels". Why do I have to hear
> hip-hop
> when I shop for pants? Just because I wear pants doesn't mean this is
> my favorite music.
>
> 5. Co-market the music, and offer a deal if I want to buy it.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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----------------------------------------------------------
Manners are a sensitive awareness of the feelings of others.
If you have that awareness, you have good manners, no matter
what fork you use.
- Emily Post

Peter Bagnall - http://people.surfaceeffect.com/pete/

25 Jan 2007 - 8:54am
.pauric
2006

Tracy: "I'll add number 6... allow me to turn off background music in
my internet settings, just as I might turn off graphics or Javascript.
Because I, for one, don't want to listen to it. At all."

I recommend this firefox extension which provides OS level audio
control on the bottom of the browser window. Also supports track
back/next on most audio players inc pandora/itunes/winamp
https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/219/

26 Jan 2007 - 1:27pm
Andrew Maben
2007

I think it's gone because it's intrusive.

When you go to the mall, enter a store, you are a physical visitor to
their environment, so the presence of their chosen background music
is reasonable and expected.

In the virtual environment perhaps we need to revisit the idea of a
"visitor" to a web site? The environment - both physical (home/office/
on-the-road) and virtual (computer + OS + browser) - is owned by the
user. So it is not so much the user visiting the website, as the user
inviting the website to visit him. When a salesman or proselytizer
shows up at the door, his boom-box on the doorstep blasting his
choice of music is not likely to be welcome...

For myself, when I use my computer I'm usually either listening to my
choice of music or enjoying silence - in either case I don't welcome
anyone's attempts to hijack my choice. Music on a site = back button
+ never return.

Andrew

http://www.andrewmaben.com
andrew at andrewmaben.com

"In a well designed user interface, the user should not need
instructions."

On Jan 24, 2007, at 5:27 PM, discuss-
request at lists.interactiondesigners.com wrote:
From: "Dan Williams" <dgwillia at googlemail.com>
Date: January 23, 2007 10:20:55 PM EST
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Where has the music gone?

I remember in the early days (pre web 1.0 and well before the birth
of the
blog) that a lot of people coded (or at least used a WYSIWYG HTML
editor) small personal websites that contained huge lists of all theire
favourite things from films to trivial facts and not much else. One
thing however that does stick in my mind from those days is that people
often attached a sample of their favourite music track or sound bite
as a
background sound to their homepage (and this was in the days of dial up
connections!). *where has this music gone?*

The effects of music on people's mood is well documented and studies
have
even showed how music can influence peoples purchasing decisions.
Every time
I go into a shop I hear music, music specifically selected to
influence my
mood. *Where has this gone on the web?* We have broadband now!

OK so I am not talking about a couple of polyphonic sounding effects,
I am
talking about going onto Amazon and hearing streaming tracks in the
background just as if I were in a CD store. *Any thoughts? *
**

26 Jan 2007 - 2:31pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Andrew,

I love this analogy! That really does seem like an appropriate way to
approach the design of a site.

Jack

On Jan 26, 2007, at 1:27 PM, Andrew Maben wrote:

> So it is not so much the user visiting the website, as the user
> inviting the website to visit him.

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

In our society,
the scarce factor is not information,
it is time to attend to information.

- Herb Simon

26 Jan 2007 - 5:36pm
cfmdesigns
2004

>From: Peter Bagnall <pete at surfaceeffect.com>
>
>Personally I have to agree with #6 too, and all those who hate the
>music. But stepping out of myself for a moment I know several people
>who find music on websites to be fun and engaging.

Oh, I certainly find it "fun and engaging", except when it ends up "abrasive
and offputting". The reasons I despise (most) music on websites is because
of past experiences:

* You visit a site and WHOA IT'S WAY TOO LOUD!!!!

* You visit a site and it starts playing immediately. You have no warning, and
no chance to turn off your radio or stop the CD that's playing, so you end up
with a cacophony for 30 seconds until you can get one or the resolved. (And that
30 seconds completely breaks any edge of a ludic space you were in. No longer can
you focus on reading and browsing, instead you have to throw everything on the floor
and scramble around to multiple apps and appliances in a panic jus to hear yourself
think.)

* If there's a mute option for the site's music (and there isn't in
many cases), it's in a different location and has a different appearance in
every case. While that's no surprise, it doesn't make the experience any
better when you can't find what you want easily.

* All too often, it isn't *good* music, but it's some digitized and compressed
MP3 with the bass line zapped out, so you have something not much better than those
high-pitched Christmas carol greeting cards that drive Hallmark staffers postal.

So to make it fun and engaging:
* Make it good quality music
* Moderate the volume
* Warn me it's coming
* Make it easy for me to stop it

-- Jim

26 Jan 2007 - 5:42pm
Daniel Williams
2005

It seems most people who responded are not opposed to background music on
the web, just the way it is has previously been implemented.

Thank you for all the responses. I think that background music should *could
*be considered as an option for certain sites and just because it has proved
to be annoying in the past (because of bad implementation and design) needs
not imply that it cannot be implemented differently.

in my opinion the silent web (as one of you described it) is a little behind
the times.

Thanks for all the suggestions upon how to implement a design with
background music that would not annoy or frustrate

On 1/26/07, Jim Drew <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:
>
> >From: Peter Bagnall <pete at surfaceeffect.com>
> >
> >Personally I have to agree with #6 too, and all those who hate the
> >music. But stepping out of myself for a moment I know several people
> >who find music on websites to be fun and engaging.
>
> Oh, I certainly find it "fun and engaging", except when it ends up
> "abrasive
> and offputting". The reasons I despise (most) music on websites is
> because
> of past experiences:
>
> * You visit a site and WHOA IT'S WAY TOO LOUD!!!!
>
> * You visit a site and it starts playing immediately. You have no
> warning, and
> no chance to turn off your radio or stop the CD that's playing, so you end
> up
> with a cacophony for 30 seconds until you can get one or the
> resolved. (And that
> 30 seconds completely breaks any edge of a ludic space you were in. No
> longer can
> you focus on reading and browsing, instead you have to throw everything on
> the floor
> and scramble around to multiple apps and appliances in a panic jus to hear
> yourself
> think.)
>
> * If there's a mute option for the site's music (and there isn't in
> many cases), it's in a different location and has a different appearance
> in
> every case. While that's no surprise, it doesn't make the experience any
> better when you can't find what you want easily.
>
> * All too often, it isn't *good* music, but it's some digitized and
> compressed
> MP3 with the bass line zapped out, so you have something not much better
> than those
> high-pitched Christmas carol greeting cards that drive Hallmark staffers
> postal.
>
>
> So to make it fun and engaging:
> * Make it good quality music
> * Moderate the volume
> * Warn me it's coming
> * Make it easy for me to stop it
>
> -- Jim
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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1 Feb 2007 - 9:09pm
Ben Hopkins
2006

I think the main practical obstacle to successfully adding music to a site
is lack of support for it in HTML, necessitating embedded controls that
don't usually have anything to do with the actual content of the site. Also
audio files will reload and start over when you navigate to a different page
unless you're stuck in a frameset or some other content-irrelevant hack.
This is one thing that Flash seems to do pretty well, particularly in terms
of seamlessly syncing sound clips with actions/events.

2 Feb 2007 - 12:50pm
Todd Moy
2007

>From my experience, the music has migrated to myspace. Per Ben's
point, myspace lowers the barrier for novice publishers to embed music
widgets. For anyone who thought the design abuses of the early web
(mid music, blink tags, and the ilk) had gone the way of the dodo,
know that it's just as rampant albeit more "contained".

Music can be used effectively, but like everything else, you need to
be sure it really matches the user's expectation. Movie sites, games,
etc. are plausible contexts, but most people don't want to hear IBM's
rally cry < http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/music/music_clips.html
> if they're trying to buy a server.

-Todd

On 2/1/07, Ben Hopkins <benchh at gmail.com> wrote:
> I think the main practical obstacle to successfully adding music to a site
> is lack of support for it in HTML, necessitating embedded controls that
> don't usually have anything to do with the actual content of the site. Also
> audio files will reload and start over when you navigate to a different page
> unless you're stuck in a frameset or some other content-irrelevant hack.
> This is one thing that Flash seems to do pretty well, particularly in terms
> of seamlessly syncing sound clips with actions/events.
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
____________________________
oombrella | User Experience Design
http://www.oombrella.com
oombrella at gmail.com

3 Feb 2007 - 7:49pm
Pierre Roberge
2005

IMO a good use of music in website is in the Maybach website:
http://www.maybachusa.com/

I felt like it added prestige, class, ... The bad side is that the clip
is very short and repeats itself too often.

Pierre Roberge
User Experience Designer
etfs

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5 Feb 2007 - 12:06pm
Daniel Williams
2005

Yes I agree, I think it works well for some High end brands such as this.

Also interestingly I read an article in British Press that brands such as
Sony and Samsung are spending money developing brand fragrances. So maybe
the next post will be 'Where is the smell'.

It is interesting because both fragrance and sound both have impacts upon
people's mood and ultimately their purchasing decisions.

On 2/3/07, Pierre Roberge <Pierre.Roberge at etfsinc.com> wrote:
>
>
> IMO a good use of music in website is in the Maybach website:
> http://www.maybachusa.com/
>
> I felt like it added prestige, class, ... The bad side is that the clip
> is very short and repeats itself too often.
>
> Pierre Roberge
> User Experience Designer
> etfs
>
>
> ----------
> etfs inc. The information transmitted is intended only for the person or
> entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or
> privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other
> use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon this information by
> persons or entities other than the intended recipient, is prohibited. If
> you have received this in error, please contact the sender and delete
> the material from any computer. Unless otherwise stated, opinions
> expressed in this e-mail are those of the author and are not endorsed
> by the author's employer.
>
> etfs inc. L'information transmise ne s'adresse qu'au particulier ou a
> l'organisme a qui il est dirige. Il peut contenir des renseignements de
> nature privilegiee et/ou confidentielle . Si le lecteur de ce message
> n'est pas le destinataire vise, ni l'employe ou le mandataire charge de
> la livraison au destinataire vise, il est par la presente avise que
> toute dissemination, distribution ou transcription de cette
> communication est strictement interdite. Si vous avez recu la presente
> communication par erreur, veuillez nous en aviser immediatement par
> courriel et detruire le document de tout ordinateur le contenant. A
> moins d'avis contraire, toute opinion exprimee dans le present courriel
> est celle de son auteur et n'est pas endossee par l'employeur de la
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>
> ________________________________________________________________
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7 Feb 2007 - 6:44pm
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Feb 5, 2007, at 9:06 AM, Dan Williams wrote:

> Also interestingly I read an article in British Press that brands
> such as
> Sony and Samsung are spending money developing brand fragrances. So
> maybe
> the next post will be 'Where is the smell'.

That doesn't bode well for all the work we've been doing on the
"scent of information."

Jared

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