Affordances (was Re: iPhone Keynote)

16 Jan 2007 - 11:51am
7 years ago
2 replies
552 reads
.pauric
2006

Mark Said "In short, the brain stores and reassembles images, not words."

I'm not sure this is strictly true Mark, given the eight general types
of intelligence Visual/Spatial, Logical/Mathematical, Linguistic, Interpersonal,
Intrapersonal, Musical, Bodily kinesthetic and Spiritual
(Naturalist)...

I would say my brain, what there is off it, does a little processing
on any possible affordances available based on the context. If I'm in
a Kinesthetic interaction then it is true that I'm likely not to
bother reading signs, e.g [Push] beside a handle when the 'handle'
tells me 'pull' from my Kinetic memory.

However, if a different example; if I'm responding to design
discussion with an engineer I will tend to rely on my linguistic
processes to recall specifications/user defs/case studies, etc when
putting an argument together (as well as some interpersonal
reasoning). I dont feel like I'm using much in the way of images when
scanning my memory for references within documents. Similarly, in a
room full of people I do not reach for my phone when one rings,
because it doesnt sound like mine.

In short, and I'm happy to be corrected by someone who's studied this,
I think the brain will utilize one of the eight intelligences based on
context. Its not always visual.

regards - pauric
> On 1/16/07, Mark Schraad <mschraad at mac.com> wrote:
> > In short, the brain stores and reassembles images, not words.
>

--
Job type: In house
Field: Embedded & physical interfaces. Web/cli

Comments

16 Jan 2007 - 3:15pm
DrWex
2006

On 1/16/07, pauric <radiorental at gmail.com> wrote:
> Mark Said "In short, the brain stores and reassembles images, not words."
>
> I'm not sure this is strictly true

It's almost certainly both true and false, at least insofar as we can
tell from communication errors people make. The research I'm familiar
with is a couple decades old but should still be relevant. In
observing so-called speech production errors (people say the wrong
word) you can find a class of people who produce words that are
lexically similar to the intended word. Most often these are words
that start with the same phoneme as the intended word. We can infer
from this that the intended word is sufficiently "close" (for some
arbitrary meaning of close) to the intended word that it got retrieved
instead, despite their imagistic dissimilarity.

So for example I might say "Jack" when I mean "Jason" even though the
two men look very little alike.

On the other hand, it's quite rare for speakers to say "Jane" instead
of "Jason" even though the words share some phonemic similarity -
actually more phonemic similarity than "Jack".. Again making wild
guesses at what this tells us about the brain we assume that there is
something about the very different concepts to which "Jason" and
"Jane" refer that cause us not to make that kind of error.

Once you move out of the category of basic nouns the story gets even
less intelligible. Nobody has been able to provide a satisfactory
theory of how the brain stores an abstract concept like "honesty" or
"advanced" that would be very hard to render imagistically.

Best,
--Alan

16 Jan 2007 - 4:28pm
Esteban Barahona
2006

do you have the study available online (ie: a pdf with a Creative Commons
license...)?

Marvin Minsky (eff.org<http://www.eff.org/cgi/search-proxy.py?q=Marvin+Minsky&sa=Search+EFF>
del.icio.us<http://del.icio.us/search/?fr=del_icio_us&p=Marvin+Minsky&type=all>
google<http://www.google.com/search?hl=es&client=firefox-a&rls=com.ubuntu%253Aes-ES%253Aofficial&hs=0AG&q=Marvin+Minsky&btnG=B%25C3%25BAsqueda&lr=>search)
thought of meaning as circular... and incorrect in a (classic)
logical way.

2007/1/16, Alan Wexelblat <awexelblat en gmail.com>:
>
> On 1/16/07, pauric <radiorental en gmail.com> wrote:
> > Mark Said "In short, the brain stores and reassembles images, not
> words."
> >
> > I'm not sure this is strictly true
>
> It's almost certainly both true and false, at least insofar as we can
> tell from communication errors people make. The research I'm familiar
> with is a couple decades old but should still be relevant. In
> observing so-called speech production errors (people say the wrong
> word) you can find a class of people who produce words that are
> lexically similar to the intended word. Most often these are words
> that start with the same phoneme as the intended word. We can infer
> from this that the intended word is sufficiently "close" (for some
> arbitrary meaning of close) to the intended word that it got retrieved
> instead, despite their imagistic dissimilarity.
>
> So for example I might say "Jack" when I mean "Jason" even though the
> two men look very little alike.
>
> On the other hand, it's quite rare for speakers to say "Jane" instead
> of "Jason" even though the words share some phonemic similarity -
> actually more phonemic similarity than "Jack".. Again making wild
> guesses at what this tells us about the brain we assume that there is
> something about the very different concepts to which "Jason" and
> "Jane" refer that cause us not to make that kind of error.
>
> Once you move out of the category of basic nouns the story gets even
> less intelligible. Nobody has been able to provide a satisfactory
> theory of how the brain stores an abstract concept like "honesty" or
> "advanced" that would be very hard to render imagistically.
>
> Best,
> --Alan
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