What's your Personality Type? (Related to: Now Hiring Leonardo DaVinci?)

29 Sep 2006 - 11:52pm
7 years ago
41 replies
2777 reads
Dana Smith
2005

Hello Everyone,

I am very curious about the personality types of designers, and the
recent conversation about multidisciplinary skill-sets prompted this
message to you.

I'd like to conduct an informal (and quite unscientific) survey about
the personality types on this list. I think it could shed light on
topics of interest to many of us, including another way to look at what
it is to be a Designer.

Let's use the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as common ground. The MBTI
generates a 4-letter type, and I anticipate many of you have taken this
at some point in your educational or professional careers. If you're
not familiar with the MBTI, or don't know your type, more info is at
the end of this message.

My initial questions are also below; if you have limited time, there
are two quick main questions.

I'm interested in any stories or information you are willing to share.
Please feel free to reply on or off-list as you feel comfortable. I
will report an anonymous tally of the types and corresponding
occupations back to the group. (Of course, I'll include my own type and
thoughts as well. :) )

I'm going to continue this exploration in the coming months with a goal
of simply understanding what this thing we call Designer is, and how
personality types might play a role in our design process.

If any of you have expert knowledge of the MBTI, experience
administering the test, or use personality type information in your
design work, I welcome your perspective as well.

Thank you all, and I hope you'll participate and discuss,
Dana

----------

Here are the questions:

-----------

The quick two:
- What is your type?
- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

If you're willing to write more:
- How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
person?
- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
meaningful to you?
- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
- If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
is prominently used?
- What else?

----------

----------

MBTI resources:

- Wikipedia is a great starting point:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBTI

- This free test is the closest to the official test that I've seen:
http://www.personalitytest.net/types/index.htm
(There are also a variety of (not free) resources available online and
off to take the original MBTI in a more structured, authentic way.)

- My favorite site for the Type profiles:
http://www.typelogic.com/

----------

(A discussion about the reliability of this test could be another long
thread, I'm sure. My particular interest here is in what your result
meant to you personally and as a designer; did it ring true?)

Comments

30 Sep 2006 - 10:20am
seele@obso1337.org
2005

On Saturday 30 September 2006 00:52, Dana Smith wrote:
>
> The quick two:
> - What is your type?

INTP

> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Interaction Architect for Industry, HCI specialist for Open Source Technology,
IDIA research graduate student.

At work lately I have been breaking down conventional design patterns to find
their weaknesses and explore new and better ways of doing things.

For the Open Source community I have been helping research Desktop interaction
and improve the ways people interact with and understand their information.

In school I have been exploring information space and typical IA patterns to
find better ways of organizing, presenting, and interacting with information.

So in short, I try to make the ways we do things, better.

> If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?

I don't know why being labeled a certain way would change my way of thinking.
I had the test administered to me several times and the scale was generally
the same. If there is any credibility to this test (which that itself has
been debated) I would think iNtuitiveness and Perception are the two most
important traits.

> - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?

Not really, I think anyone who is mentally healthy and comfortable with
themself will have an idea of who they really are. It may be an eye opener
for those who aren't really aware of themselves.

> - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

Certainly. My boss and I are very A type personalities when it comes to
design (which is strange because I *really* am an introverted person
otherwise). Its hard to explain why something "feels" right or wrong without
breaking down the heuristics of your thinking. Often you dont have the
luxury of time to do that when youre in the middle of a debate.

Not too long ago Dan Saffer wrote a piece called "So you want to be an
interaction designer" and touches on this trait as well. I certainly think
that some people are going to just be better at design than others, just like
some people have a different mindset about programming and will be better
than others. I don't think that a simple test would be able to tell you who
those people are.

Cheers~

~ Celeste

--
Celeste 'seele' Paul
www.obso1337.org

30 Sep 2006 - 10:43am
cherylkimble
2005

there's also the kiersy temperament sorter.

ttp://www.keirsey.com/

infj

artist
(information architect by day)

30 Sep 2006 - 7:00pm
bhekking
2006

> - What is your type?
INFJ (I'm starting to see a trend here...)

> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
Interaction Designer for a small software company...was a software engineer
previously, but I never felt comfortable in that role. Getting an MS in Human
Factors part-time at Bentley College. Before I got married/had a kid, I was a
serious amateur photographer.

> - What else?
I've always been fascinated with personality typing tools, but I've never
really reflected on the results. I always come out as 'the artist', but with an
analytical bent.

- Bret Hekking, Massachusetts

Bret Hekking

"Computers let you make more mistakes faster than any other invention in human history, with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila."
- Mitch Ratcliffe

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

30 Sep 2006 - 7:22pm
Dan Saffer
2003

ENTJ.

I'm convinced that the N is probably a requirement to be an
interaction designer, no matter what the other facets are.

BTW, if you haven't taken this test, the link is here. Takes about 10
minutes:

http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes2.asp

Dan Saffer
book http://www.designingforinteraction.com
work http://www.adaptivepath.com
site http://www.odannyboy.com

30 Sep 2006 - 8:21pm
Dana Smith
2005

Hi Celeste,

> My boss and I are very A type personalities when it comes to
> design (which is strange because I *really* am an introverted person
> otherwise).

I've had a similar experience; I occasionally joke that I'm, "an I
masquerading as an E."
I often wonder if, for me, that's partially a result of growing up in
the US, which I believe to be a culture that more often than not
rewards extroversion.
Of course, it's not that black-and-white; there is much within my type
description that seems to become More true as time passes.

> Not too long ago Dan Saffer wrote a piece called "So you want to be an
> interaction designer" and touches on this trait as well.

An excellent article, indeed. It can be found here:

http://adaptivepath.com/publications/essays/archives/000656.php

Dana

30 Sep 2006 - 8:24pm
cherylkimble
2005

so this is where all the infj's are hiding.

anyone out there intj?

i've met 2 really brilliant ia's who are of that type...

At 5:00 PM -0700 9/30/06, Bret Hekking wrote:
>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>> - What is your type?
>INFJ (I'm starting to see a trend here...)

30 Sep 2006 - 8:29pm
Dana Smith
2005

Hi Cheryl,

> there's also the kiersy temperament sorter.
>
> ttp://www.keirsey.com/

Ah, yes, the associated book Please Understand Me II is one of my
favorites, and goes into quite a bit more detail than any of the
internet resources I've seen. Two thumbs up :)

Dana

30 Sep 2006 - 8:39pm
Mark Kot
2006

>>> - What is your type?

INTJ.

Interesting test. The descriptions by D. Keirsey & J. Butt & M.M.
Heiss seem to fit, so I'm good with it... :)

Mark

30 Sep 2006 - 8:41pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

I am another INTP.
That's "Prime Minister" in Kingdomality personal proile, by the way.

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

On 9/30/06, Celeste 'seele' Paul <seele at obso1337.org> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> On Saturday 30 September 2006 00:52, Dana Smith wrote:
> >
> > The quick two:
> > - What is your type?
>
> INTP
>
> > - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
>
> Interaction Architect for Industry, HCI specialist for Open Source
> Technology,
> IDIA research graduate student.
>
> At work lately I have been breaking down conventional design patterns to
> find
> their weaknesses and explore new and better ways of doing things.
>
> For the Open Source community I have been helping research Desktop
> interaction
> and improve the ways people interact with and understand their
> information.
>
> In school I have been exploring information space and typical IA patterns
> to
> find better ways of organizing, presenting, and interacting with
> information.
>
> So in short, I try to make the ways we do things, better.
>
> > If you're willing to write more:
> > - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> > career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> > person?
>
> I don't know why being labeled a certain way would change my way of
> thinking.
> I had the test administered to me several times and the scale was
> generally
> the same. If there is any credibility to this test (which that itself has
> been debated) I would think iNtuitiveness and Perception are the two most
> important traits.
>
> > - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> > meaningful to you?
>
> Not really, I think anyone who is mentally healthy and comfortable with
> themself will have an idea of who they really are. It may be an eye
> opener
> for those who aren't really aware of themselves.
>
> > - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
>
> Certainly. My boss and I are very A type personalities when it comes to
> design (which is strange because I *really* am an introverted person
> otherwise). Its hard to explain why something "feels" right or wrong
> without
> breaking down the heuristics of your thinking. Often you dont have the
> luxury of time to do that when youre in the middle of a debate.
>
> Not too long ago Dan Saffer wrote a piece called "So you want to be an
> interaction designer" and touches on this trait as well. I certainly
> think
> that some people are going to just be better at design than others, just
> like
> some people have a different mindset about programming and will be better
> than others. I don't think that a simple test would be able to tell you
> who
> those people are.
>
> Cheers~
>
> ~ Celeste
>
> --
> Celeste 'seele' Paul
> www.obso1337.org
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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>

30 Sep 2006 - 8:45pm
cherylkimble
2005

does anybody have this issue?

my old boss was an intj and i an infj. we absolutely couldn't work
together. the f was so abstract (idealists) and the t was so concrete
(rationals) that we never seemed to understand where the other was
coming from. also, f's like to work in teams and t's like to work
alone.

ck

At 6:39 PM -0700 9/30/06, Mark Kot wrote:
>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>>>> - What is your type?
>
>INTJ.
>
>Interesting test. The descriptions by D. Keirsey & J. Butt & M.M.
>Heiss seem to fit, so I'm good with it... :)
>
>Mark
>________________________________________________________________
>Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
>List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
>(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
>Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
>Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
>Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
>Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

30 Sep 2006 - 9:35pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

This is why I got interested in personality profiles - to understand where
the other people are coming from and where to forward them in their further
journey.

By the way, rumor is that women come from Venus... Could be true according
to one of the articles this book: http://tinyurl.com/e8lt7 . Another article
in the same volume dicusses IQ and is relevant to the recent thread on
social classes and interaction design. Good book for casual, spare time
reading.

--
Oleh Kovalchuke, INTP
Interaction Design is Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

On 9/30/06, cheryl kimble <cheryl at marginalized.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> does anybody have this issue?
>
> my old boss was an intj and i an infj. we absolutely couldn't work
> together. the f was so abstract (idealists) and the t was so concrete
> (rationals) that we never seemed to understand where the other was
> coming from. also, f's like to work in teams and t's like to work
> alone.
>
> ck
>
>
>
>
> At 6:39 PM -0700 9/30/06, Mark Kot wrote:
> >[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
> >
> >>>> - What is your type?
> >
> >INTJ.
> >
> >Interesting test. The descriptions by D. Keirsey & J. Butt & M.M.
> >Heiss seem to fit, so I'm good with it... :)
> >
> >Mark
> >________________________________________________________________
> >Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> >List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> >List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> >(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> >Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> >Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> >Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> >Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

30 Sep 2006 - 10:11pm
Cwodtke
2004

You know, I would swear this was also done on IAI or SIG_IA mailing
lists. Or both, perhaps. I think the results would be far more
interesting across as many different design professions as possible.
Would Spotco turn out different personality types than Cooper?

And I'm always something different, and always a bit in the middle. injf
one day, entj another. Depends on what happened to me that day, and if
I got enough sleep.

What am I? An entrepreneur.

Dana Smith wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> Hello Everyone,
>
> I am very curious about the personality types of designers, and the
> recent conversation about multidisciplinary skill-sets prompted this
> message to you.
>
> I'd like to conduct an informal (and quite unscientific) survey about
> the personality types on this list. I think it could shed light on
> topics of interest to many of us, including another way to look at what
> it is to be a Designer.
>
> Let's use the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as common ground. The MBTI
> generates a 4-letter type, and I anticipate many of you have taken this
> at some point in your educational or professional careers. If you're
> not familiar with the MBTI, or don't know your type, more info is at
> the end of this message.
>
> My initial questions are also below; if you have limited time, there
> are two quick main questions.
>
> I'm interested in any stories or information you are willing to share.
> Please feel free to reply on or off-list as you feel comfortable. I
> will report an anonymous tally of the types and corresponding
> occupations back to the group. (Of course, I'll include my own type and
> thoughts as well. :) )
>
> I'm going to continue this exploration in the coming months with a goal
> of simply understanding what this thing we call Designer is, and how
> personality types might play a role in our design process.
>
> If any of you have expert knowledge of the MBTI, experience
> administering the test, or use personality type information in your
> design work, I welcome your perspective as well.
>
> Thank you all, and I hope you'll participate and discuss,
> Dana
>
>
> ----------
>
> Here are the questions:
>
> -----------
>
> The quick two:
> - What is your type?
> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
>
> If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?
> - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?
> - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
> - If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
> is prominently used?
> - What else?
>
> ----------
>
> ----------
>
> MBTI resources:
>
> - Wikipedia is a great starting point:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBTI
>
> - This free test is the closest to the official test that I've seen:
> http://www.personalitytest.net/types/index.htm
> (There are also a variety of (not free) resources available online and
> off to take the original MBTI in a more structured, authentic way.)
>
> - My favorite site for the Type profiles:
> http://www.typelogic.com/
>
> ----------
>
> (A discussion about the reliability of this test could be another long
> thread, I'm sure. My particular interest here is in what your result
> meant to you personally and as a designer; did it ring true?)
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
Christina Wodtke
Principal Instigator

Magazine :: http://www.boxesandarrows.com
Business :: http://www.publicsquarehq.com
Personal :: http://www.eleganthack.com
Book :: http://www.blueprintsfortheweb.com

cwodtke at eleganthack.com

30 Sep 2006 - 11:33pm
Dana Smith
2005

Hi Christina,

> You know, I would swear this was also done on IAI or SIG_IA mailing
> lists. Or both, perhaps.

Do you remember what kind of response it elicited?

> I think the results would be far more
> interesting across as many different design professions as possible.
> Would Spotco turn out different personality types than Cooper?

I completely agree, and I think it's worth doing. Whether my inbox is
prepared for it is another question entirely.

I'm inclined to wait a bit to see more of the types of responses we get
here, and the information people are interested in and comfortable
sharing. I'll be thinking about it over the next few days.

Anyone else interested?

Dana

30 Sep 2006 - 11:36pm
Fred Sampson
2005

>
>The quick two:

- What is your type?
INTJ, borderline ISTJ

>
- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Information developer, with latent tendencies toward information
architecture and interaction design.

Cheers,
Fred

--
Fred Sampson
Information Developer
fred at fredsampson.com
radio.weblogs.com/0107659

1 Oct 2006 - 5:19am
Henrik Olsen
2006

Interesting survey. I'm an ENTJ freelance interaction designer.
--
Henrik Olsen
www.guuui.com

1 Oct 2006 - 9:05am
Petteri Hiisilä
2004

Dana Smith kirjoitti 30.9.2006 kello 7:52:

> The quick two:
> - What is your type?

INFJ 11 62 50 1

The J can be P sometimes, depending on the day I take the test.

> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Senior interaction designer / freelancer.

> If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?

For other's sake and to be sure that my intuition is right, I try to
do a lot of objective validation to different framework directions
and interaction solutions. Personas and validation scenarios have
been particulary useful in this.

> - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?

Not surprising.

> - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

Yes, some people need more facts before they are willing to believe
that this is the correct design direction. After all, there is a lot
of "soft" thinking involved in the early phases of design, especially
when designing a completely new product. Research, personas and
scenarios help me to look and be sure. I try to avoid projects that
don't have resources for the research part.

> - If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test
> that
> is prominently used?

I don't know. I haven't been in psychological tests.

--
Petteri Hiisilä
Senior Interaction Designer
IX Design / +358505050123 / petteri.hiisila at ixdesign.fi

"Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm."
- Ralph Waldo Emerson

1 Oct 2006 - 9:37am
Tori Egherman
2005

Taking these tests now after three years of living in Iran makes me realize
how culturally biased they are. My personality has changed because I live
here. Do I trust people? Three years ago the answer was "yes", now it's
"no". That's just one example. I see a lot more circumstance than
personality in the answers now.

Tori

On 10/1/06, Petteri Hiisilä <petteri.hiisila at ixdesign.fi> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
>
> Dana Smith kirjoitti 30.9.2006 kello 7:52:
>
> > The quick two:
> > - What is your type?
>
> INFJ 11 62 50 1
>
> The J can be P sometimes, depending on the day I take the test.
>
> > - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
>
> Senior interaction designer / freelancer.
>
> > If you're willing to write more:
> > - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> > career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> > person?
>
> For other's sake and to be sure that my intuition is right, I try to
> do a lot of objective validation to different framework directions
> and interaction solutions. Personas and validation scenarios have
> been particulary useful in this.
>
> > - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> > meaningful to you?
>
> Not surprising.
>
> > - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
>
> Yes, some people need more facts before they are willing to believe
> that this is the correct design direction. After all, there is a lot
> of "soft" thinking involved in the early phases of design, especially
> when designing a completely new product. Research, personas and
> scenarios help me to look and be sure. I try to avoid projects that
> don't have resources for the research part.
>
> > - If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test
> > that
> > is prominently used?
>
> I don't know. I haven't been in psychological tests.
>
> --
> Petteri Hiisilä
> Senior Interaction Designer
> IX Design / +358505050123 / petteri.hiisila at ixdesign.fi
>
> "Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm."
> - Ralph Waldo Emerson
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

1 Oct 2006 - 10:10am
Mark Schraad
2006

On Sep 30, 2006, at 12:52 AM, Dana Smith wrote:

>
> The quick two:
> - What is your type?

E I F J
33 75 12 44

> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

entrepreneur
interaction explorer
brand and marketing consultant
business strategist

>
> If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?

Not much.

> - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?

an amusing and thought provoking exercise. could vary significantly
depending on the day - the recent events and what is immediately
ahead of me. social sciences are not really science.

> - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

of course.

> - If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test
> that
> is prominently used?

> - What else?

Self evaluation (as in this exercise) is completely different than
the evaluation of research participants or targeted personas. It does
not relate terribly well to design research. Researcher introspection
IS valid - but is process and goal driven.

1 Oct 2006 - 11:38am
Maria Cordell
2010

On 9/30/06, Dana Smith <Dana at danasmithdesigns.com> wrote:
...

-----------
>
> The quick two:
> - What is your type?

INTJ

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
>
> Information Architect / Interaction Designer

1 Oct 2006 - 12:18pm
k lenox
2006

> Message: 14
> Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2006 18:45:59 -0700
> From: cheryl kimble <cheryl at marginalized.com>
>
> does anybody have this issue?
>
> my old boss was an intj and i an infj. we absolutely couldn't work
> together. the f was so abstract (idealists) and the t was so concrete
> (rationals) that we never seemed to understand where the other was
> coming from. also, f's like to work in teams and t's like to work
> alone.
>
> ck

Yes, over the years I have experienced more challenges in
communicating with rationals in general. I've found collaboration to
be virtually non-existent with rationals as well. Collaboration to
the rationals I've worked with seems to be "you do your stuff, I'll
do mine and we'll integrate it in the end".

And for the record...

What is your type?
Today, I'm an ENFJ

I find it interesting that my extroverted-ness is lessoning as I get
older (a fine example is that this is my first post on this list!). I
did the Myers-Briggs test back in art school and I was extremely
extroverted, now only "slightly expressed extrovert" (22). But I
think this score might change on a weekly basis as well.

What is your occupation?
I am an interaction designer for a consumer electronics company
designing advanced concepts for the north american and global markets.

Prior to doing interaction design fulltime I was a software developer
during the 'multimedia' CD-Rom days of the 90's. My 1st career
however was as a commercial photographer (pre-digital/photoshop).

Side note: I've noticed many photography majors from college (15-20
yrs ago) are now UI designers and/or IA people. This has always been
a curiosity for me. Photography was very technical (chemicals, light,
apertures, etc) but also very creative (self-expression,
communication, etc). I find interaction design to also be a balance
of technical (specifications, functional requirements, etc) and
creative (emotional quality, etc).

But I agree that in hiring, it's rare to find a modern day Leonardo
DaVinci.

-Kim Lenox

1 Oct 2006 - 1:05pm
Michele Marut
2005

"You know, I would swear this was also done on IAI or SIG_IA mailing
lists."

It was on the STC Usability SIG discussion list in August and the topic was
also discussed in

UPA "User Experience Magazine" Volume 5, Issue 2, 2006

*The View from Here
*What Kind of Person Would Want to Do Usability?
By Cliff Anderson

1 Oct 2006 - 2:49pm
cherylkimble
2005

great. then i'm not crazy...

>Yes, over the years I have experienced more challenges in
>communicating with rationals in general. I've found collaboration to
>be virtually non-existent with rationals as well. Collaboration to
>the rationals I've worked with seems to be "you do your stuff, I'll
>do mine and we'll integrate it in the end".

i'm a photographer too. i've thought a lot about this, why ia/id
folks tend to come from art/photo, and i think it has to do with the
formal structure of art. formal structure in art has quite a bit to
do with how the elements are composed (canvas, print, etc...) and so
does a webpage, application, etc...

in western cultures we tend to be, and think the rest of the world as
well, reads and views visual elements from top to bottom, left to
right. of course this isn't true, but our view of an americanized
world insists that they do and also that they conform to our ways of
seeing and experiencing.

it also has to do with the conceptual nature of the industry. more
and more ia/id is required to "create" an interface that doesn't
conform to current conventions. conceptual thinkers are much more
suited to this type of work since they can create something from
nothing. and artists are most certainly conceptual.

ck

>
>Side note: I've noticed many photography majors from college (15-20
>yrs ago) are now UI designers and/or IA people. This has always been
>a curiosity for me. Photography was very technical (chemicals, light,
>apertures, etc) but also very creative (self-expression,
>communication, etc). I find interaction design to also be a balance
>of technical (specifications, functional requirements, etc) and
>creative (emotional quality, etc).

1 Oct 2006 - 3:18pm
Dan Saffer
2003

On Oct 1, 2006, at 7:37 AM, Tori Egherman wrote:

> Taking these tests now after three years of living in Iran makes me
> realize
> how culturally biased they are. My personality has changed because
> I live
> here. Do I trust people? Three years ago the answer was "yes", now
> it's
> "no". That's just one example. I see a lot more circumstance than
> personality in the answers now.

Certainly, behaviorists would argue that outside stimuli such as
location can affect personality over time.

Dan

1 Oct 2006 - 4:06pm
Jim Ungar
2006

>
> INTJ

My title is user interface engineer. In practice , I lead the UCD process at
my company. IxD, IA, and UI all rolled into one.

- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
meaningful to you?
I thought it was uncanny how well the INTJ description fit me.

Jim

1 Oct 2006 - 6:05pm
Sean Voisen
2006

FYI: More info on types here:
http://www.businessballs.com/personalitystylesmodels.htm

My Type: Yet another INTJ. Funny, the first time I took this test I was a
teenager and an ISTP. Personality changes slightly as you grow older and
have more experiences I think. ISTP (crafter/troubleshooter) was definitely
me earlier in my life, when I pursued programming, engineering and hard
sciences. INTJ is definitely more accurate for me today.

My Occupation: Project manager/design technologist. I'm almost always the
"bridge person" between business, design and engineering on any given
project. Most of my time is spent helping with interaction design, making
sure the visual designs stay true to the IxD, and then using my comp sci
(ISTP) background to work with engineering on implementation.

- Sean

1 Oct 2006 - 6:07pm
Jay Morgan
2006

> The quick two:
> - What is your type?

ENFP (41, 76, 58, 58) on the Personality Test Center test.
then
ENFJ (89, 50, 12, 1) on the Jung Typology Test.
You can see how the P & J flipped. I'll say, I thought the Jung test
wording was clearer. Those questions are loaded, so the words have to be
clear to the subject to get a good score.

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

IA. I might be in the wrong room, though. It sounds like I'm lucky to be
employed.

If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?

Career: I knew I was just lucky to be employed before I took this. I'd
sooner consider myself a daydreamer who can sustain an argument.
Design: Not sure. Design is so much more lively when it's bigger than a
personality profile set.
Other people: At first, I think it's absurd to even bring these tests up.
Then, I start to see how I could use the results without stereotyping, and I
just wait to see who does use it to stereotype - themselves and others.

- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?

I don't have much context for this to take meaning within. Seeing the Jung
article helps, but being compared to celebrities is not as meaningful as
being compared to family, coworkers, people I live and grow with. Of
course, seeing Margaret Mead's picture there in my type description helped
me understand how Feminine Mystique was one of the most moving, meaningful,
extraordinarily conceived and crafted modern books I've read.

I appreciate everyone sharing. I'd like to know if any other ENFP/Js are
out there.
Thanks,
Jay

- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
> - If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
> is prominently used?
> - What else?
>
> ----------
>
> ----------
>
> MBTI resources:
>
> - Wikipedia is a great starting point:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBTI
>
> - This free test is the closest to the official test that I've seen:
> http://www.personalitytest.net/types/index.htm
> (There are also a variety of (not free) resources available online and
> off to take the original MBTI in a more structured, authentic way.)
>
> - My favorite site for the Type profiles:
> http://www.typelogic.com/
>
> ----------
>
> (A discussion about the reliability of this test could be another long
> thread, I'm sure. My particular interest here is in what your result
> meant to you personally and as a designer; did it ring true?)
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
Jay A. Morgan
jayamorgan at gmail

2 Oct 2006 - 12:10am
Dana Smith
2005

Hi Jay,

> I start to see how I could use the results without stereotyping, and I
> just wait to see who does use it to stereotype - themselves and
> others. 

I think this is a very important point. In my opinion, these types of
tests do start to become dangerous when too much emphasis or rigidity
is put on the result. The test-taking process can be just as important
an exercise as the outcome. I've found my four-letter type to be most
useful as simply a short-hand way of generating understanding, but I
would never want it to stand alone as some generalized description of
me.

Regarding using types to understand others, I believe if we can think
of it in terms of, "she's behaving more like this and less like that,
because of ____ motivation," the framework can remain useful without
forcing unnecessary divisions or stereotyping.

I envision personality / interaction preferences as an additional lens
we can look through during many phases of the qualitative research
and/or design process. But that is a topic for another day soon when I
have more time.

And many thanks to everyone who has replied so far! This is very, very
interesting. Hopefully we'll get to see even more responses as the
workweek kicks off.

Dana

2 Oct 2006 - 12:17am
Christine Boese
2006

I'm an ENFP who often flops to an ENTJ.

That would depend on which side of a Saturn return or Saturn square I'm on.
That kind of stress tends to bring out the TJ in me <grin>.

My occupations have been all over the map, but here are a few:

newspaper reporter, photojournalist, poet, technical writer, graphic
designer, grad student, professor, multimedia artist, interaction designer,
community manager, usability researcher, futurist, wedding photographer,
tarot card reader, cyberculture ethnographer, and fly on the wall.

You'll have to figure out how the two connect, cuz while I see a method in
it, most people I encounter have difficulty wrapping their heads around it.

Chris

>
> Here are the questions:
>
> -----------
>
> The quick two:
> - What is your type?
> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
>
> If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?
> - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?
> - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
> - If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
> is prominently used?
> - What else?
>
> ----------
>
> ----------
>
> MBTI resources:
>
> - Wikipedia is a great starting point:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBTI
>
> - This free test is the closest to the official test that I've seen:
> http://www.personalitytest.net/types/index.htm
> (There are also a variety of (not free) resources available online and
> off to take the original MBTI in a more structured, authentic way.)
>
> - My favorite site for the Type profiles:
> http://www.typelogic.com/
>
> ----------
>
> (A discussion about the reliability of this test could be another long
> thread, I'm sure. My particular interest here is in what your result
> meant to you personally and as a designer; did it ring true?)
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
christine boese
www.serendipit-e.com

2 Oct 2006 - 12:35am
cherylkimble
2005

yes! you are right on dana. i also see it as a way to learn how to
better communicate with, well, anyone.

the more you know, the better you understand.

cheryl

>
>Regarding using types to understand others, I believe if we can think
>of it in terms of, "she's behaving more like this and less like that,
>because of ____ motivation," the framework can remain useful without
>forcing unnecessary divisions or stereotyping.
>
>.
>
>Dana

2 Oct 2006 - 12:48am
ErikaOrrick
1969

The quick two:
- What is your type?
I, too, am an ENFP

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
My title is currently User-Centered Design Engineer, I am a
jack-of-all-trades IxDA/usability professional that does interaction design,
observational research, focus groups, usability testing, reqs gathering,
etc, whatever is called for, since I am it as far as HCI professionals in my
organization. I have tended to gravitate towards jobs that allow me to a
little of everything, probably so I don't get bored. I even teach this
stuff on the side, just because I enjoy the additional interaction with
students.

On 9/29/06, Dana Smith <Dana at danasmithdesigns.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Hello Everyone,
>
> I am very curious about the personality types of designers, and the
> recent conversation about multidisciplinary skill-sets prompted this
> message to you.
>
> I'd like to conduct an informal (and quite unscientific) survey about
> the personality types on this list. I think it could shed light on
> topics of interest to many of us, including another way to look at what
> it is to be a Designer.
>
> Let's use the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as common ground. The MBTI
> generates a 4-letter type, and I anticipate many of you have taken this
> at some point in your educational or professional careers. If you're
> not familiar with the MBTI, or don't know your type, more info is at
> the end of this message.
>
> My initial questions are also below; if you have limited time, there
> are two quick main questions.
>
> I'm interested in any stories or information you are willing to share.
> Please feel free to reply on or off-list as you feel comfortable. I
> will report an anonymous tally of the types and corresponding
> occupations back to the group. (Of course, I'll include my own type and
> thoughts as well. :) )
>
> I'm going to continue this exploration in the coming months with a goal
> of simply understanding what this thing we call Designer is, and how
> personality types might play a role in our design process.
>
> If any of you have expert knowledge of the MBTI, experience
> administering the test, or use personality type information in your
> design work, I welcome your perspective as well.
>
> Thank you all, and I hope you'll participate and discuss,
> Dana
>
>
> ----------
>
> Here are the questions:
>
> -----------
>
> The quick two:
> - What is your type?
> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
>
> If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?
> - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?
> - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
> - If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
> is prominently used?
> - What else?
>
> ----------
>
> ----------
>
> MBTI resources:
>
> - Wikipedia is a great starting point:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBTI
>
> - This free test is the closest to the official test that I've seen:
> http://www.personalitytest.net/types/index.htm
> (There are also a variety of (not free) resources available online and
> off to take the original MBTI in a more structured, authentic way.)
>
> - My favorite site for the Type profiles:
> http://www.typelogic.com/
>
> ----------
>
> (A discussion about the reliability of this test could be another long
> thread, I'm sure. My particular interest here is in what your result
> meant to you personally and as a designer; did it ring true?)
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

2 Oct 2006 - 8:19am
SusieComet
2006

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

On 9/29/06, Dana Smith <Dana at danasmithdesigns.com> wrote:
>
> The quick two:
> - What is your type?

ENTP

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

User Interface Designer
UI design and hi-fi prototyping, graphic design, UI specifications,
wireframes, usability testing. Lead singer / bass player/ guitar player.

If you're willing to write more:
> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?

I'm more extrovert than anything... this has shaped most of my experiences
-
I love to be on stage, whether it's giving a presentation or with my band.

UI work comes easy to me, as does music. Might as well do what you feel
you're good at!
Plus, I love both jobs :)

Susan Patrick
User Interface Designer
The Midland Company
(513) 947-6072

"Design is a process - an intimate collaboration between engineers,
designers, and clients." - Henry Dreyfuss, Industrial Designer

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2 Oct 2006 - 9:24am
Meg Houston Maker
2004

> - What is your type?

INTJ
Interactive product designer, ia, project manager, academic

2 Oct 2006 - 10:06am
Jay Morgan
2006

Dana,

My last job was in a group who used personality typing on a semi-annual
basis as a group exercise. All 40-50 people in the area - including admins
- would get together for a half-day session. The VP was big on, uh, knowing
who people were so he'd know how to win with them - or against them, as he
needed to. I got a real kick out of the exercise when he and I ended up
sitting next to each other because our scores were closest.

That team tended to post their colors up in their cube, really identifying
with it for a few weeks until the novelty wore off. Of course, the leaders
who cared about the types, really learned how to engineer project teams.
The mistake is that you set out to engineer or program a process that needs
degrees of spontaneity, discovery, and inspection to achieve value and
sustain a business. After a while, the habit to rely on a specific set of
people develops. Also, those individuals become predictable and easily
influenced.

It was good as an exploratory exercise. It was really sick when applied as
a team selection method. For every statement about "it's good to use x-type
to balance with y-type", there's a chance that something unpredictable,
educational, and valuable will happen when you let work happen.

Can you tell I care about corporate culture?
- Jay

On 10/2/06, Dana Smith <Dana at danasmithdesigns.com> wrote:
>
> Hi Jay,
>
> > I start to see how I could use the results without stereotyping, and I
> > just wait to see who does use it to stereotype - themselves and
> > others.
>
> I think this is a very important point. In my opinion, these types of
> tests do start to become dangerous when too much emphasis or rigidity
> is put on the result. The test-taking process can be just as important
> an exercise as the outcome. I've found my four-letter type to be most
> useful as simply a short-hand way of generating understanding, but I
> would never want it to stand alone as some generalized description of
> me.
>
> Regarding using types to understand others, I believe if we can think
> of it in terms of, "she's behaving more like this and less like that,
> because of ____ motivation," the framework can remain useful without
> forcing unnecessary divisions or stereotyping.
>
> I envision personality / interaction preferences as an additional lens
> we can look through during many phases of the qualitative research
> and/or design process. But that is a topic for another day soon when I
> have more time.
>
> And many thanks to everyone who has replied so far! This is very, very
> interesting. Hopefully we'll get to see even more responses as the
> workweek kicks off.
>
> Dana
>
>
>

--
Jay A. Morgan
jayamorgan at gmail

2 Oct 2006 - 10:29am
Chris McLay
2005

- What is your type?

INFJ / INTJ

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Interaction & Visual Designer - Student - Parent

- How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
person?

It rarely crosses my mind. I hate taking the tests as I'm sure they
are rarely interpreted correctly by those who ask for them.

- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
meaningful to you?

I'm not sure I learned anything new. It was like reading something
familiar. Mind you I had been working for a while and have a pretty
good idea of who I am by the time I first took the test.

- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

No. Don't really trust them enough. Prefer to work other ways.

- If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test
that is prominently used?

Australia. Not in my experience - but we are almost the US anyway :-)

--
Chris McLay ...// interaction & visual designer

Email chris at eeoh.com.au
Web http://www.eeoh.com.au/chris/

2 Oct 2006 - 12:03pm
Todd Roberts
2005

INTP

Roles are mostly interaction design with some product strategy, business
process design and project management as needed.

My whole organization did MBTI a few months ago. It is interesting to find
out the personality types of people you work with and see commonalities
among people that drive you crazy. Doesn't necessarily make them any more
fun to work with, but at least gives some sense of where they're coming from
and can improve communication by suggesting different strategies.

2 Oct 2006 - 12:16pm
Patricia Mourthé
2005

Hi Dana,

My personality type is: ENFJ (Pedagogue) - I've done this test twice before and recall that this has always been the result, even though I found hard to "agree" 100% with any of the answers for the test questions.

Doing this test I found trapped by having to opt or this or that (or 100% or 100%) when in “real” life my answer would be something like 60% of the times I act like that and 40% of the times I act the other way around (the world is not black and white either).

My job title is user interface designer and as others in this list, I am sort of Jack-of-all-trades; under this title I do information architecture, system requirements gathering, interface design, system and usability testing, system documentation, proposals and presentation preparation, training and at the side, I teach graphic design courses.

Patricia Mourthe

Dana Smith <Dana at DanaSmithDesigns.com> wrote:

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

Hello Everyone,

I am very curious about the personality types of designers, and the
recent conversation about multidisciplinary skill-sets prompted this
message to you.

I'd like to conduct an informal (and quite unscientific) survey about
the personality types on this list. I think it could shed light on
topics of interest to many of us, including another way to look at what
it is to be a Designer.

Let's use the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as common ground. The MBTI
generates a 4-letter type, and I anticipate many of you have taken this
at some point in your educational or professional careers. If you're
not familiar with the MBTI, or don't know your type, more info is at
the end of this message.

My initial questions are also below; if you have limited time, there
are two quick main questions.

I'm interested in any stories or information you are willing to share.
Please feel free to reply on or off-list as you feel comfortable. I
will report an anonymous tally of the types and corresponding
occupations back to the group. (Of course, I'll include my own type and
thoughts as well. :) )

I'm going to continue this exploration in the coming months with a goal
of simply understanding what this thing we call Designer is, and how
personality types might play a role in our design process.

If any of you have expert knowledge of the MBTI, experience
administering the test, or use personality type information in your
design work, I welcome your perspective as well.

Thank you all, and I hope you'll participate and discuss,
Dana

----------

Here are the questions:

-----------

The quick two:
- What is your type?
- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

If you're willing to write more:
- How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
person?
- What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
meaningful to you?
- Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?
- If you are outside the US, is there different or additional test that
is prominently used?
- What else?

----------

----------

MBTI resources:

- Wikipedia is a great starting point:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MBTI

- This free test is the closest to the official test that I've seen:
http://www.personalitytest.net/types/index.htm
(There are also a variety of (not free) resources available online and
off to take the original MBTI in a more structured, authentic way.)

- My favorite site for the Type profiles:
http://www.typelogic.com/

----------

(A discussion about the reliability of this test could be another long
thread, I'm sure. My particular interest here is in what your result
meant to you personally and as a designer; did it ring true?)

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

---------------------------------
Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls. Great rates starting at 1¢/min.

2 Oct 2006 - 1:03pm
Jason Perez
2006

- What is your type?
INFP (70% 76% 52% 88%)

- What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)
Business Systems Analyst - Requirements activites, IA, Interface Design...
for various types of projects [Business Process Improvement, Internal
Development, COTS implementation]

I have always had an over-active imagination so when I started off in
college I thought I could leverage that by working towards graphic design
degree. I was young and impatient and the structure drove me bonkers. I
turned to fine arts - illustration... even that had structure. Then I met a
girl -> love -> talk of marriage -> better get a career going that has "pay
the bills" potential. I got a Business Adminstration degree and stumbled
upon a few IT roles. Somehow a few years ago I fell into this fuzzy space
call Business Analysis. I liked the lack of structure and the creative
freedom. Standards have since come into play, but now they're welcomed.
Recently I have been trying to get more involved in IA and IxD activities
and now it feels like I have come full circle from where I started off...
but somehow money made its way into the equation. Yay!

I have taken this the MB test at various stages in my life and initially I
couldn't get good results because I would know the purpose of the test and
therefore I would try to analyze each question knowing it's goal was to make
a statement about me that I didn't care to know so I just shaped it to be
something I wanted. But looking back at things, here's what I've noticed:

I = 70%. This used to be higher but it is definately trending down as my
passion for what I do, and my confidence, increases.
N = 76%. Least amount of variance through the years.
F = 52%. Sometimes I'm a T , other times an F...
P = 88%. My natural tendency, but at work I have had to play a J role many
times... *blech*.

--
--- Jason
----
--- 'Always use your imagination.'
--
< (( CRAYOLA (( )

2 Oct 2006 - 9:25pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

> - What is your type?
ENFJ (1, 50, 50, 78)

> - What is your occupation? (Please be as specific as possible.)

Interaction Designer

I work for a small software development firm. As many others on the
list, I'm the only IxD resource, so I cover the gamut (user study,
research, requirements, UI, prototyping, implementation, testing,
documentation). My background is in Graphic Design and the visual
arts, and I use these talents in my work as needed (photography,
illustration, etc.). In addition, I teach design part-time. Other's
have brought it up, so I'll also mention that I'm a musician.

> - How does knowledge of your type impact your thoughts about your
> career, design, other people, and yourself - as a designer and as a
> person?

It doesn't. While it's interesting to read the description, there is
nothing I intend to change about my personality.

> - What was your experience when you learned your type? Was it
> meaningful to you?

I confess that I was surprised at the accuracy of the test. I
purposefully tried not to think too hard about each question, usually
taking my initial reaction. I didn't expect to agree with the results
of the test, yet find that it is a fair description. However, I
wouldn't say that it is meaningful to me. I already knew what type of
person I was, and I'm perfectly satisfied. If I had completely
disagreed with the results, I would have dismissed it as
inconsequential.

> - Has personality type ever played a role in your research or designs?

Perhaps subconsciously. I don't believe I have ever taken personality
type into consideration when designing software, but it may have come
into play in some of my Graphic Design.

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

I am in search of the
simple elegant seductive
maybe even obvious IDEA.
With this in my pocket
I cannot fail.

- Tibor Kalman

6 Oct 2006 - 1:28pm
jbellis
2005

Is there a Myers-Briggs sort of test that organizations can take, so we know who we're joining before we enlist?
Hmmm, what would the dimensions be?

Cheap<--- Salary --->Generous
Protectionist<--- Dynamism --->Empowering
Social<--- Friendliness --->Dreary
Open<--- Authenticity --->Backstabbing

Of course the trick is choosing key letters that yield good acronyms. Let me guess; there are 20 websites already.
-Jack, GPSB

6 Oct 2006 - 4:56pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

Some of the testing has already been done. According to the personality test
administered to various corporations, these legal "persons" (in the US) are
typical psychopaths. Watch 'The Corporation' for test description (
http://tinyurl.com/qrgn3 ) .

Food for thought...

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

On 10/6/06, jackbellis.com <jackbellis at hotmail.com> wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Is there a Myers-Briggs sort of test that organizations can take, so we
> know who we're joining before we enlist?
> Hmmm, what would the dimensions be?
>
> Cheap<--- Salary --->Generous
> Protectionist<--- Dynamism --->Empowering
> Social<--- Friendliness --->Dreary
> Open<--- Authenticity --->Backstabbing
>
> Of course the trick is choosing key letters that yield good acronyms. Let
> me guess; there are 20 websites already.
> -Jack, GPSB
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10 Oct 2006 - 7:28pm
Michele Marut
2005

Could IXDA create a Best Places to Work for interaction designers award or
list?

It could be created for consultancies and as well as corporations.

Even just creating and sharing the criteria might benefit job seekers and
employers.

on *Fri Oct 6 11:28:21 PDT 2006* Jack Bellis wrote---
Is there a Myers-Briggs sort of test that organizations can take, so we know
who we're joining before we enlist? Hmmm, what would the dimensions
be?Cheap<--- Salary --->Generous Protectionist<--- Dynamism --->Empowering
Social<--- Friendliness --->Dreary Open<--- Authenticity --->Backstabbing Of
course the trick is choosing key letters that yield good acronyms. Let me
guess; there are 20 websites already. -Jack, GPSB

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