Are interaction designers an elite class?

19 Sep 2006 - 6:18pm
7 years ago
4 replies
600 reads
codiuk
2006

hi from codi,I came across this amazing book which talks about the new
creative class, it was so refreshing to see Richard highlight and express
some of the things that makes me what to design when I sit down with a
pencil and paper. It is refreshing so i thought I will share this with you
all, so do take time to download the free PDF or check out the podcast.

http://www.theclassofthenew.net/

The Class of the New by Richard Barbrook

Netizens, elancers, cognitarians, swarm-capitalists, hackers, produsumers,
knowledge workers, pro-ams... these are just a few of the monikers that have
been applied to the new social class emerging from the networked workplace.

In this short book, Richard Barbrook presents a collection of quotations
from authors who in different ways attempt to identify an innovative element
within society: 'the class of the new'. Announcing a new economic and social
paradigm, this class constitutes a 'social prophecy' of the shape of work to
come. From Adam Smith's 'Philosophers' of the late 18th century, down to the
'Creative Class' celebrated by sociologist Richard Florida today, the class
of the new represents the future of production within and beyond capitalism.

Comments

21 Sep 2006 - 11:51am
John Monberg
2006

The analysis of what counts as a class has a very long history in
social and political theory. Alan Liu, who is both a humanities
professor and self-professed technogeek--he helped to create Voice of
the Shuttle, an early and wonderful clearinghouse for humanities
information on the web-- presents one of the most thoughtful analysis
of class formation that is specific to the field of design in his
ironically titled book, "Laws of Cool."

John Monberg

22 Sep 2006 - 9:09am
Anthony Armendariz
2006

If being an user experience designer makes me part of an elitist
group than I want off and should change careers ;)
-Anthony

On Sep 21, 2006, at 12:51 PM, John Monberg wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> The analysis of what counts as a class has a very long history in
> social and political theory. Alan Liu, who is both a humanities
> professor and self-professed technogeek--he helped to create Voice of
> the Shuttle, an early and wonderful clearinghouse for humanities
> information on the web-- presents one of the most thoughtful analysis
> of class formation that is specific to the field of design in his
> ironically titled book, "Laws of Cool."
>
> John Monberg
>
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22 Sep 2006 - 9:35am
Dan Saffer
2003

On Sep 22, 2006, at 7:09 AM, Anthony Armendariz wrote:

> If being an user experience designer makes me part of an elitist
> group than I want off and should change careers ;)

The original question here, if I'm not wrong (I'm restating), is
whether or not interaction designers fall into the category that
Richard Florida calls the "Creative Class." The answer IMHO is
emphatically yes, in what Florida deems the "Super-Creative
Core." (Along with writers, artists, architects, performers, other
types of designers.)

Florida said in an interview with Tom Peters, "I call the designers,
architects, and culturally creative people the "super-creative core." "

http://www.creativeclass.org/_flight_article_tompeters051605.shtml

The reason is we create new stuff out of nothing. Creativity is a
central part of our jobs, not simply necessary to do the job well (as
it is for lawyers, doctors, etc. in the rest of the Creative Class.

Dan

24 Sep 2006 - 4:34pm
thedude thedude
2006

>The reason is we create new stuff out of nothing. Creativity is a central
>part of our jobs, not simply necessary to do the job well (as it is for
>lawyers, doctors, etc. in the rest of the Creative Class.

In depends on consideration what creativity is and what purpose it serves,
the same gows for "elite". I never had much consideration for authority,
only for the merit of intellectual work (what I consider to be
"intellectual"). As long as it serves some common sense purpose, or
contributes to that I think it's worth for me to listen.

I think it's save to say there is so much to be done in our field. I agree
with Dan that we create stuff out of nothing (if you would exclude our vivid
minds). Our field is still not the place to rely on routine descisions. But
I would like to refrain from comments about other jobs such as lawyers,
docters, etc. At least there is too some creativity and ingenuity involved.

If a group of minds targeted on the now and the future of how people
interact with technology would cover the definition of "elite ", I would be
happy to be included. If it would mean: "people who are authorities and can
sit on their lazy asses to say how other people should think" than I would
consider me not part of the elite, speaking for myself I would happily be a
dreamer.

It not all in words, it's in what people decide what they contribute so
their existence serves a purpose. And I think most people here are practical
enough to see we are not the wrong kind of elite, at worst we are a bunch of
dreamers.

The context:
>>If being an user experience designer makes me part of an elitist
>>group than I want off and should change careers ;)

>The original question here, if I'm not wrong (I'm restating), is whether or
>not interaction designers fall into the category that Richard Florida calls
>the "Creative Class." The answer IMHO is emphatically yes, in what Florida
>deems the "Super-Creative Core." (Along with writers, artists, architects,
>performers, other types of designers.)

>Florida said in an interview with Tom Peters, "I call the designers,
>architects, and culturally creative people the "super-creative core." "

>http://www.creativeclass.org/_flight_article_tompeters051605.shtml

>The reason is we create new stuff out of nothing. Creativity is a central
>part of our jobs, not simply necessary to do the job well (as it is for
>lawyers, doctors, etc. in the rest of the Creative Class.

>Dan

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