sites with filtering

25 Aug 2006 - 3:31pm
8 years ago
11 replies
1645 reads
Monique Escamilla
2006

Hi,

Does anyone know of some good examples of sites that offer filtered
navigation? For example, I'm thinking of Left-hand navigation menus with
fly-outs that filter?

Thanks!!

Monique Escamilla
User Experience Intern
Symantec Corporation
monique_escamilla at symantec.com
310.449.8335
YIM neekercooks

Comments

26 Aug 2006 - 10:09am
Barbara Ballard
2005

On 8/25/06, Monique Escamilla <Monique_Escamilla at symantec.com> wrote:
> Does anyone know of some good examples of sites that offer filtered
> navigation? For example, I'm thinking of Left-hand navigation menus with
> fly-outs that filter?
>

I am currently infatuated with http://www.kayak.com

--
Barbara Ballard
barbara at littlespringsdesign.com 1-785-550-3650

28 Aug 2006 - 6:04am
John Raisch
2006

RE: Does anyone know of some good examples of sites that offer filtered
navigation? For example, I'm thinking of Left-hand navigation menus with
fly-outs that filter?

Product Mgt and Design teams over here at GSI Commerce have been working on what we call "parametric search and navigation" (i.e. filtered nav/faceted nav) for ecommerce for a while now.

Check out www.dickssportinggoods.com > Exercise > Cardio > Treadmills , as well as many other categories in the catalog (terminal nodes only in this example).

We also use the underlying engine (with various flavors of the UI) on Radioshack.com, Zales.com, Toysrus.com, and a bunch more -- with partners rolling out with the engine often.

We've benchmarked circuitycity.com as one of the better implementationns (as well as amount of product attribution)... macconnection.com has a cool "fly out" implementation.

Tons of benefits in doing filtered/parametric, but don't underestimate the need for thorough product attribution and a clean taxonomy.

John Raisch
Sr. Mgr, UX, GSI Commerce

28 Aug 2006 - 7:51pm
Mark Schraad
2006

So far most of the samples on this string have been searched... not
filters. The one exception is the Dicks sporting goods site. The main
problem I see with filters is whether or not you can put up with null
returns and help the user determine how they got where they are.
Multi filter systems can get very complex and the typical user will
explore for a bit, but will soon get frustrated - especially if they
are directed buyers and not meandering shoppers.

Mark

On Aug 26, 2006, at 12:09 PM, Barbara Ballard wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> On 8/25/06, Monique Escamilla <Monique_Escamilla at symantec.com> wrote:
>> Does anyone know of some good examples of sites that offer filtered
>> navigation? For example, I'm thinking of Left-hand navigation
>> menus with
>> fly-outs that filter?
>>
>
> I am currently infatuated with http://www.kayak.com
>
> --
> Barbara Ballard
> barbara at littlespringsdesign.com 1-785-550-3650
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28 Aug 2006 - 7:55pm
Dave Malouf
2005

> So far most of the samples on this string have been searched... not
> filters. The one exception is the Dicks sporting goods site.
> The main
> problem I see with filters is whether or not you can put up
> with null
> returns and help the user determine how they got where they are.
> Multi filter systems can get very complex and the typical user will
> explore for a bit, but will soon get frustrated - especially if they
> are directed buyers and not meandering shoppers.

Huh? How is the Kayak thing not a filter?
There is a search component to Kayak, but then after you search you can
reduce or even add to your original result set by changing controlled
parameters like time of day, number of stops, airports and airlines.

How are you defining filter?
I know I think of them quite differently from each other, but I'm pretty
confident that Kayak has filtering after you do the initial search.

-- dave

28 Aug 2006 - 8:20pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Yes, you are right, it does eventually help you to eliminate some of
the search results with sliders and check boxes... (and I would
certainly define that as filtering) but for the most part,
particularly if you measure by the time spent, it is a very targeted
search engine. From the users experience perspective, Kayak is a bit
like going to the department store and gathering all of the coats in
the store, putting them in a big pile, and then sorting for my size
and color. Maybe it is just how I shop for travel (yes I know... a
focus group of one)... but there was no place for me to expand my
search with the filters... only change the search criteria.

Mark

On Aug 28, 2006, at 9:55 PM, David (Heller) Malouf wrote:

>
>> So far most of the samples on this string have been searched... not
>> filters. The one exception is the Dicks sporting goods site.
>> The main
>> problem I see with filters is whether or not you can put up
>> with null
>> returns and help the user determine how they got where they are.
>> Multi filter systems can get very complex and the typical user will
>> explore for a bit, but will soon get frustrated - especially if they
>> are directed buyers and not meandering shoppers.
>
> Huh? How is the Kayak thing not a filter?
> There is a search component to Kayak, but then after you search you
> can
> reduce or even add to your original result set by changing controlled
> parameters like time of day, number of stops, airports and airlines.
>
> How are you defining filter?
> I know I think of them quite differently from each other, but I'm
> pretty
> confident that Kayak has filtering after you do the initial search.
>
> -- dave

28 Aug 2006 - 9:02pm
Dave Malouf
2005

> but there was no place for me to expand my
> search with the filters... only change the search criteria.

But isn't "expanding" your search the opposite of filtering?
Filtering is about limiting, but its very metaphor. You filter out the
coffee grind, no?

It seems what you are looking for if I have you right is something along the
lines of compound and comparative search with overlapping filtering, eh?

I've thought about this for travel. I.e. I want to decide between a trip to
Rome and a trip to Paris, but want to have a way to easily overlay these two
fairly different search results and build and compare packages with
comparable parameters. Many of the parameters may be exactly the same except
for of course destination.

This I have not seen done well yet.

-- dave

28 Aug 2006 - 9:19pm
Mark Schraad
2006

On Aug 28, 2006, at 11:02 PM, David (Heller) Malouf wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
>> but there was no place for me to expand my
>> search with the filters... only change the search criteria.
>
> But isn't "expanding" your search the opposite of filtering?
> Filtering is about limiting, but its very metaphor. You filter out the
> coffee grind, no?

No argument there... to me filtering is nearly always convergent.

> It seems what you are looking for if I have you right is something
> along the
> lines of compound and comparative search with overlapping
> filtering, eh?

The veritable synthesizer of choice? The mechanism I want needs to be
able to recognize behavioral patterns and adapt. Some users will want
a direct efficient route... others like to roam and wonder. Building
the interface that does both, and learns without being obtrusive
would be pretty cool. Something between command and control... and
organic.

>
> I've thought about this for travel. I.e. I want to decide between a
> trip to
> Rome and a trip to Paris, but want to have a way to easily overlay
> these two
> fairly different search results and build and compare packages with
> comparable parameters. Many of the parameters may be exactly the
> same except
> for of course destination.
>
> This I have not seen done well yet.

Me either, but am working on it.

Mark

>
> -- dave
>
>

29 Aug 2006 - 5:49am
jbellis
2005

Monique, now that you seen some replies, can you fine tune your original
request a little? Precisely what problem are you up against? Are you asking
about a menu system that has fewer of its items as the user drills down in
some more primary navigation? Are you asking about behavior that results
from traditionaly query criteria?
-Jack
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Schraad" <mschraad at mac.com>
> So far most of the samples on this string have been searched... not
> filters.

> > On 8/25/06, Monique Escamilla <Monique_Escamilla at symantec.com> wrote:
> >> Does anyone know of some good examples of sites that offer filtered
> >> navigation? For example, I'm thinking of Left-hand navigation
> >> menus with
> >> fly-outs that filter?
>

29 Aug 2006 - 6:24am
Todd Warfel
2003

We just wrapped a pretty intensive search research project. Having
completed the research, I think we're going to start referring to
these things as:

pre-filter - happens before the search
refine - happens after the search

The main reason for this is that the users referred them in this
manner. They want to filter things before getting search results - at
the beginning. But once they perform the search, get back the
results, they use a series of methods (sorting, parametric
navigation, related items, related searches) to refine that search set.

Honestly, this makes more sense to me than terms I've used in the
past - everything was a filter. Now, refining makes more sense. After
all, that maps to their behaviors and goals.

On Aug 28, 2006, at 9:55 PM, David (Heller) Malouf wrote:

> Huh? How is the Kayak thing not a filter?
> There is a search component to Kayak, but then after you search you
> can
> reduce or even add to your original result set by changing controlled
> parameters like time of day, number of stops, airports and airlines.
>
> How are you defining filter?
> I know I think of them quite differently from each other, but I'm
> pretty
> confident that Kayak has filtering after you do the initial search.

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (607) 339-9640
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

29 Aug 2006 - 6:25am
Todd Warfel
2003

Another reason why we use refine.

On Aug 28, 2006, at 11:19 PM, Mark Schraad wrote:

>> But isn't "expanding" your search the opposite of filtering?
>> Filtering is about limiting, but its very metaphor. You filter out
>> the
>> coffee grind, no?
>
> No argument there... to me filtering is nearly always convergent.

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (607) 339-9640
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

29 Aug 2006 - 9:09am
Monique Escamilla
2006

Thanks for the rich responses. By asking a pretty general question, I
received quite an education in the potentials, nuances, and pros/cons of
filtering. In response to Jack's question, I am researching the use of
fly-out navigation in a left-hand nav menu for a large business site.
I'm considering filtering as a possible solution to menus that have
secondary (or potentially tertiary) fly-out. I'm still at the
consideration phase, so all of the responses have been very helpful,
indeed.

In addition, I'm in my first information architecture internship, so
thanks again for all of the helpful site recommendations, and, in
particular, the larger issues that aren't on my radar yet.

Best,
Monique

-----Original Message-----
From: jackbellis [mailto:jackbellis at hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2006 4:49 AM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Cc: Monique Escamilla
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] sites with filtering

Monique, now that you seen some replies, can you fine tune your original
request a little? Precisely what problem are you up against? Are you
asking about a menu system that has fewer of its items as the user
drills down in some more primary navigation? Are you asking about
behavior that results from traditionaly query criteria?
-Jack
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Schraad" <mschraad at mac.com>
> So far most of the samples on this string have been searched... not
> filters.

> > On 8/25/06, Monique Escamilla <Monique_Escamilla at symantec.com>
wrote:
> >> Does anyone know of some good examples of sites that offer filtered

> >> navigation? For example, I'm thinking of Left-hand navigation menus

> >> with fly-outs that filter?
>

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