How can I measure perception and adoptability?

7 Aug 2006 - 6:53pm
4 years ago
7 replies
3275 reads
oliver green
2006

Hi All,

As a graduate student in Human Computer Interaction, I have been
taught multiple techniques of traditional usability testing e.g.
heuristic evaluations, controlled experiments etc. But how do I go
about measuring the perception and adoptability of a system? Any
pointers will be much appreciated.

I hope this is the right place to ask this question, if not then
please ignore it.

Thanks,
Oliver.

Comments

8 Aug 2006 - 3:08am
A.C.Roibas at b...
2005

Oliver,

In order to address complex issues such as acceptability, perception, understanding, emotion, security, trust and privacy related to the use of an interactive system, the data gathering techniques need to focus on users rather than purely on their tasks or objectives with the analyzed interfaces. For example, the physical and social contexts have a strong impact in the users’ attitudes towards mobile interactive multimedia applications: the context influences in a positive or negative way the users’ emotions and feelings towards the interaction process, persuading or discouraging its use.
I suggest you to explore user centered approaches based on ethnomethods together with user studies of behaviour and needs. These issues will be discussed at EPIC 2006 [http://www.epic2006.com/].

I hope this helps.

Best,

Anxo

----------------------------------------------------
Dr. Anxo Cereijo Roibás,
SCMIS
Faculty of Management & Information Sciences
University of Brighton
Watts Building, Moulsecoomb
Brighton BN2 4GJ, UK
m +44(0)7814 491790; t +44(0)1273 64 2458; f +44(0)1273 64 2405
http://cmis.mis.brighton.ac.uk/staff/anxo/

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com on behalf of oliver green
Sent: Tue 8/8/2006 00:53
To: discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] How can I measure perception and adoptability?

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

Hi All,

As a graduate student in Human Computer Interaction, I have been
taught multiple techniques of traditional usability testing e.g.
heuristic evaluations, controlled experiments etc. But how do I go
about measuring the perception and adoptability of a system? Any
pointers will be much appreciated.

I hope this is the right place to ask this question, if not then
please ignore it.

Thanks,
Oliver.
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8 Aug 2006 - 8:02am
Paul Sherman
2006

>Oliver Green wrote:
As a graduate student in Human Computer Interaction, I have been taught
multiple techniques of traditional usability testing e.g.
heuristic evaluations, controlled experiments etc. But how do I go about
measuring the perception and adoptability of a system? Any pointers will be
much appreciated.

----

There are a number of surrogate measures that will help you make
*inferences* about the desirability and adoptability of systems. Here are
some suggestions and references:

-Participant ratings of task satisfaction, task utility (and system
utility), etc.

-Participants' responses to open-ended questions that prompt for
desirability, satisfaction and utility.

-Capture of participants' affective reactions, such as verbal and non-verbal
expressions of delight and frustration.

-The recent work by Benedek and Miner on the "Desirability Toolkit":
http://www.microsoft.com/usability/UEPostings/DesirabilityToolkit.doc

-The Repertory Grid method. There are some online tools that you can use to
run people through the RP method. Just google for them. Here are some
references:
--Hassenzahl, M. (2003). Character Grid: A Simple Repertory Grid Technique
for Website Analysis and Evaluation. In J. Ratner (Ed.). Human Factors and
Web Development (Second Edition). Lawrence Erlbaum: Mahwah, NJ.
--Baber, C. (1996). Repertory grid theory and its application to product
evaluation. In P. Jordan, B. Thomas, B. A. Weerdmeester, & I. L. McClelland
(Eds.), Usability evaluation in industry (pp. 157-165). London: Taylor &
Francis.

HTH,
Paul

--
Paul Sherman
Director, User Centered Design
Sage Software

9 May 2010 - 4:22pm
John Mayes
2010

You may find information on the application and background to the Repertory Grid technique at my web site <a href="http://enquirewithin.co.nz">enquirewithin.co.nz</a> helpful. The site is devoted to issues related to the practical application of grid. I have also started a bolg at <a href=http://repertorygrid.blogspot.com>repertorygrid.blogspot.com</a> that is devoted to real life examples of application of grid and there are two posting there that may be of particular interest related to software usability.

8 Aug 2006 - 1:52pm
Rodrigo Campos
2006

> >Oliver Green wrote:
> As a graduate student in Human Computer Interaction,
> I have been taught
> multiple techniques of traditional usability testing
> e.g.
> heuristic evaluations, controlled experiments etc.
> But how do I go about
> measuring the perception and adoptability of a
> system? Any pointers will be
> much appreciated.

Sieckenius, on her last work on Semiotic Engineering
(2005, MIT Press), proposes a very usefull method of
evaluating how users respond to a system.

Rodrigo Prates Campos

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11 Jan 2008 - 7:35pm
oliver green
2006

Hi All,

I had asked this question a while back and received some interesting
comments - I was wondering if other people had more input?

As a graduate student in Human Computer Interaction, I have been taught
multiple techniques of traditional usability testing e.g. heuristic
evaluations, controlled experiments etc. But how do I go about measuring the
perception and adoptability of a system? Any pointers will be much
appreciated.
Thanks,
Oliver.

12 Jan 2008 - 1:11am
Phil Chung
2007

Oliver,

By "adoptability" I assume you mean how easy it is to learn or transfer existing knowledge to the use of it. That is, how "intuitive" is the system. How about a controlled study to see how quickly users learn to use it or field studies with a prototype to see how easily users can adopt it into their existing work routines? If you wanted to make some predictions in advance of a prototype, you could examine
(and ask users to examine) the similarities between the system and a predecessor in terms of I/O method, semantics, control locations, task
procedures, etc. If there is no predecessor, examine their existing work routines and goals, and you can make some predictions about whether the new system will even be useful. There are other factors to consider, depending on the complexity of the system, such as the available types of training and support.

"As a graduate student in Human Computer Interaction, I have been
taught multiple techniques of traditional usability testing e.g.
heuristic evaluations, controlled experiments etc. But how do I go
about measuring the perception and adoptability of a system? Any
pointers will be much appreciated."

You seem hesitant to go beyond the boundaries of what you learned / are learning in grad school, and I can definitely sympathize (I finished grad school in '06). Management consultants learn analytical methods in b-school, but in the field they have to go beyond to solve a client's problem. If there's nothing in the field (there is in fact a good amount of literature on these topics) or your toolbox of methods, be creative and extrapolate something new. It's called research "design" for a reason.

Phil

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14 Jan 2008 - 9:01am
Benjamin Ho
2007

Oliver,

It sounds like you need more experience in usability testing.
You'll get a better feel when you do structured tests and free-form
tests.

I find that structured tests give both facets, learnability and
perception. It's all in the user actions. Observe how they use it
given a certain task. Also time them. That will give you a
quantifiable data point. And then have them do a similar task a few
more times and you'll see their times decrease - hopefully. Then
you can graph it.

For free-form tests, I generally use this as a "conversation" about
the design and their perception. Ask a million questions to get the
most insight.

As Phil suggests, never be afraid to step out of your boundaries.
Your degree is only a foundation from which to build your techniques
- it's not a means to an end.

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