When to display grid in list view

7 Aug 2006 - 12:47am
8 years ago
3 replies
656 reads
RyanaChan
2006

I'm puzzled by grid these days.
When to display grid as default? I found it just in Excel, where there is a table with many rows and columns, the grid is diplayed as default. Or, I can infer that grid is necessary when user need to orient in some cell frequently.
Anyone can talk about it?
Or is there any article mentioned this topic?

--
Best Regards!

Ryana Chan
Editor: http://www.uigarden.net
Weaving Usability and Cultures

Mobile: 86 138170 12412

Comments

7 Aug 2006 - 10:58am
Juan Lanus
2005

Ryana,
I don't get your question well ... so I'll write about how I use grids.

I use grids for columnar listings, both in web and desktop
applications. IMO it replaces old printed business listings that
involve several data columns, like for example a bank account
statement.
To me, a grid is like the columnar listing of the interactive computer
in that it holds data columns, with the due differences: it accounts
for the user's font preferences, it's somehow resizable, it can be
copied and pasted elsewhere, etc. All, assuming it's well done.
--
Juan Lanus
TECNOSOL
Argentina

On 8/7/06, ryanachan <ryanachan at 163.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>
>
> I'm puzzled by grid these days.
> When to display grid as default? I found it just in Excel, where there is a table with many rows and columns, the grid is diplayed as default. Or, I can infer that grid is necessary when user need to orient in some cell frequently.
> Anyone can talk about it?
> Or is there any article mentioned this topic?
>
>
>
> --
> Best Regards!
>
> Ryana Chan
> Editor: http://www.uigarden.net
> Weaving Usability and Cultures
>
> Mobile: 86 138170 12412
>
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8 Aug 2006 - 7:19am
Dumas, Robert
2006

Here is how I would describe some basics in the use of grids (horizontal
or vertical rules) and banding (alternating coloured backgrounds of
columns or rows)...

Grids are typically used for simple tables and banding can help with
more complex and wide tables.

Horizontal grids emphasize rows and vertical grids emphasize columns.
Either of these can be used for basic to moderately complex tables.
Using both together puts equal emphasis on columns and rows.

Horizontal banding emphasizes rows in wide tables and can help in more
complex tables. Vertical banding emphasizes the vertical relationship in
a table and again, can help with more complex or larger tables.

Combining grids and banding helps to equally distinguish vertical and
horizontal relationships especially in very dense tables.

In any case, I think when to use grids and banding is somewhat
subjective. The above are just some possible guidelines in determining
the best implementation.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------
Robert Dumas
Development Manager, User Interface
Blackboard, Inc.

Original message:
"I'm puzzled by grid these days.
When to display grid as default? I found it just in Excel, where there
is a table with many rows and columns, the grid is diplayed as default.
Or, I can infer that grid is necessary when user need to orient in some
cell frequently.
Anyone can talk about it?
Or is there any article mentioned this topic?"

9 Aug 2006 - 5:16pm
jbellis
2005

Ryana
OK, now that I understand you better...

The general answer is that you should display either grid lines or some
substitute such as banding when the eye is challenged to follow across or
down from the headings or other fields/values to the item in question. If
it's truly a large chart (more than a 'fold'), technology such as freezing
headers can substitute for gridlines:
http://web.tampabay.rr.com/bmerkey/examples/locked-column-csv.html

An article in the Society for Technical Communication's quarterly journal
did a great job of defining the optimal text size relative to the line
height (approx 50%, I think) and I think it also confirmed my feeling that
the most attractive layout uses only horizontal bands. I've never seen the
article online. This pattern can be seen in lots of publications that
otherwise have good design. Using both horizontal and vertical lines looks
oppressive in most situations. A lot of sites use light colors when they use
both. I wrote a little topic on attractive table design at:
http://www.usabilityinstitute.com/resources/userInYourFace/userInYourFace.htm#anchor8-Jack-----Hi,Jackbellis,Thank you for your kind notice.Now, I'll try to ask my question again.In Excel, the grid line is always displayed by default. Then in what casesshall the grid line be displayed in a form? One case may be the user needsto set position to certain cell frequently. Any other ideas of theguidelines to display/hide the grid line?--Kind Regards!Ryana Chan

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