Measuring awareness....

16 Mar 2004 - 11:54am
10 years ago
17 replies
780 reads
Todd Warfel
2003

Okay, I'm working on an experimental project and am looking for ideas
for evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't feel like I've found
that major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some ideas and
inspirations.

Here's a little background (email me off-list if you need more):

The system will be installed in the workplace. The goal of the system
is to create awareness w/in cubeville (fatfarms, dilbertville - take
your pick). There will be two participants. The participants'
workspaces will be "monitored" via a combination of sensors (primary
being video). Each participant will be able to view the other's space -
kind of. There will be some methods used to distort the information
stream so that privacy is still maintained. Again, the goal is
awareness. We're not really focusing on measuring emotion.

This will not be a CMC system. Communication will take place outside of
the system for the most part with the exception of the system
communicating awareness.

I've done some preliminary research into CMC evaluation, effective
computing evaluation, and situational awareness evaluation.

A few high-level questions we want to answer:
• Is it meaningful?
• Does it have an impact on the awareness (moreso than w/o the system)?
• How many levels are appropriate for communicating awareness (e.g.
here; here, but busy; not here)?
• Is the system tunable enough to provide meaning (users will be able
to "tune" the display and tweak it's output)?
• Does it have an impact on the relationship? What kind?
• Does the system make you feel obligated to interact with the person
(e.g. the display communicates that they're there, but maybe sad, so
you feel obligated to take them to lunch)?

We're going to do some baseline measurements to gather info on current
interaction and awareness. We have some ideas for this, but any input
you could provide would be useful and appreciated. Also, we'd like to
take measurements during intervals of the installation (e.g. bi-weekly)
and once the system is removed for a period of time (e.g. 2-4 weeks).
Then we'll reinstall it and measure again to see what the impact is.

Thoughts?

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.
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Comments

16 Mar 2004 - 12:13pm
Todd Warfel
2003

> What does this mean? Create awareness of what?

Someone asked me a question off-list that I think might be useful for
clarification.

Awareness of the other person.

The idea came up one evening when a few colleagues were in the office,
right next to each other, but didn't know it. One person walked in and
made a comment that "person X was all alone" and then "person Y" jumped
in and shouted "No he's not - I'm here." They were a bit taken back
that they had both been there for several hours, but didn't know it.

So, it's really just to create awareness of the other people in the
environment w/o being intrusive and disrupting privacy. It might be
used to determine if it's a good time to chat w/someone, as them to
lunch, etc.

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.
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16 Mar 2004 - 12:27pm
Dave Collins
2004

>What does this mean? Create awareness of what?

>

Awareness of the other person.

>The idea came up one evening when a few colleagues were in the office,
right next to each other, but didn't know it. One person walked in and
made a comment that "person X was all alone" and then "person Y" jumped
in and shouted "No he's not - I'm here." They were a bit taken back that
they had both been there for several hours, but didn't know it.

I'd want to examine the rationale before going into details.

If someone wanted to know who was around, they'd look, wouldn't they? If
they don't look, isn't because they are enjoying their solitude. This is
not intended to be trite, it just seems - at first glance - that this
problem takes care of itself.

At the most, I'd suggest something like Windows Messenger (or an
equivalent). By signing in and out, the user could control his status.
Avoid the Big Bro' syndrome.

(I once read a story by Robert Sawyer wherein the character invented a
device that could tell if your bedmate was asleep or awake or somewhere
in-between. Can you imagine anyone submitting to such an intrusion?)

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16 Mar 2004 - 12:42pm
Todd Warfel
2003

On Mar 16, 2004, at 12:27 PM, Dave Collins wrote:
> If someone wanted to know who was around, they’d look, wouldn’t they?
> If they don’t look, isn’t because they are enjoying their solitude.
> This is not intended to be trite, it just seems – at first glance -
> that this problem takes care of itself.

Dave, thanks for you comments...

Well, if that were the case then they would've known. Fact is they
didn't. They didn't look because they didn't know someone was there,
not because they were enjoying their solitude. Case of users not
actually doing what you might expect - theory vs. practice.

Anyway, keep in mind that this would require effort on the persons part
to get up, away from their desk, leave their work, etc. They might not
be inclined to do so if they're involved in their work. Might be
involved or distracted to the point that they wouldn't get up to take a
break - see it all the time. If you knew someone was there, say a
colleague that you socialize with, it might prompt you to get up and
interact - taking a short break.

This happened quite often at an iTV company I did some work at a couple
of years back. Some of us would be working late and not know that
anyone was there. So, we'd plow though, maybe head down to the café,
grab a sandwich and head home. Other times, when we were aware that
someone was there, we'd ask if they wanted to go grab a beer, or some
dinner, then come back and knock out a few more hours.

> At the most, I’d suggest something like Windows Messenger (or an
> equivalent). By signing in and out, the user could control his status.
> Avoid the Big Bro’ syndrome.

Interesting enough, IM gives the feeling of Big Bro' syndrome in the
environment we're testing this in. Additionally, IM can't sense the
environment like we're wanting to. These people currently use IM
(AOL/iChat and MSN). But that's for CMC, which is not what we're after.

Any other thoughts?

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.
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16 Mar 2004 - 2:00pm
Jared M. Spool
2003

I think there's even more to this than just heading out for a brew.

We work in a fairly secluded office park. In the evenings, as people file
out, occasionally you lose track of who is around and who isn't. You think
you're all alone and suddenly you hear someone -- it's a little spooky.

Just having the color tone of the lights change or a mood bar display would
give you a sense as to the occupancy of the space. That would be something
I think I'd like.

Jared

Jared M. Spool User Interface Engineering
http://www.uie.com jspool at uie.com

Join us for UIE's extremely popular Roadshow event
UIE Advanced Techniques: http://www.uie.com/events/roadshow

16 Mar 2004 - 2:21pm
Dave Collins
2004

>We work in a fairly secluded office park. In the evenings, as people
file
>out, occasionally you lose track of who is around and who isn't. You
think
>you're all alone and suddenly you hear someone -- it's a little spooky.

Ah. Now I can see how this would be beneficial on a larger scale.

Working away in the evening when suddenly the lights go out. Or not
realizing you were the last one out and not setting the alarm.

16 Mar 2004 - 3:45pm
Todd Warfel
2003

Andrei,

Thanks for your comments on design. We're actually going to be
designing something that is a hybrid of video and ambient indicators.
Guess I should be more clear - right now, we're looking into additional
methods for evaluating such methods for awareness.

On Mar 16, 2004, at 3:32 PM, Andrei Sedelnikov wrote:

>
> I found your idea really great! I'm sure people need this.
> I would only have a comment concerning the awareness indicator itself:
> it seems to me that some kind of video is still intrusive enough.
> This is really a good case to use "ambient indicators". There were
> once
> a web site which presented a different kind of ambient devices - i.e.
> a sphere changing its color as the stake values are changing
> (I don't know the exact URL unfortunately).

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.
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16 Mar 2004 - 3:32pm
Andrei Sedelnikov
2004

Hi Todd,

I found your idea really great! I'm sure people need this.
I would only have a comment concerning the awareness indicator itself:
it seems to me that some kind of video is still intrusive enough.
This is really a good case to use "ambient indicators". There were once
a web site which presented a different kind of ambient devices - i.e.
a sphere changing its color as the stake values are changing
(I don't know the exact URL unfortunately).

In your case there can be two kind of indicators.

a) overall presence - showing the presence of all people in the office.
it could look like a glass ball with light points inside - one point pro
one employee.
b) personal presence - if I would like to monitor the presence
of my collegue Jim, I would take a small ball with his name on it
and place it on my table somewhere. If Jim is suddenly gone,
his ball will not glow any more.

Of course this method requires another kind of presence detection
device, that may cause troubles.

Regards,
Andrei Sedelnikov
http://usabilist.de
----- Original Message -----
From: Todd R.Warfel
To: experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
Cc: Interaction Designers
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:54 PM
Subject: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Okay, I'm working on an experimental project and am looking for ideas for evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't feel like I've found that major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some ideas and inspirations.

Here's a little background (email me off-list if you need more):

The system will be installed in the workplace. The goal of the system is to create awareness w/in cubeville (fatfarms, dilbertville - take your pick). There will be two participants. The participants' workspaces will be "monitored" via a combination of sensors (primary being video). Each participant will be able to view the other's space - kind of. There will be some methods used to distort the information stream so that privacy is still maintained. Again, the goal is awareness. We're not really focusing on measuring emotion.

This will not be a CMC system. Communication will take place outside of the system for the most part with the exception of the system communicating awareness.

I've done some preliminary research into CMC evaluation, effective computing evaluation, and situational awareness evaluation.

A few high-level questions we want to answer:
• Is it meaningful?
• Does it have an impact on the awareness (moreso than w/o the system)?
• How many levels are appropriate for communicating awareness (e.g. here; here, but busy; not here)?
• Is the system tunable enough to provide meaning (users will be able to "tune" the display and tweak it's output)?
• Does it have an impact on the relationship? What kind?
• Does the system make you feel obligated to interact with the person (e.g. the display communicates that they're there, but maybe sad, so you feel obligated to take them to lunch)?

We're going to do some baseline measurements to gather info on current interaction and awareness. We have some ideas for this, but any input you could provide would be useful and appreciated. Also, we'd like to take measurements during intervals of the installation (e.g. bi-weekly) and once the system is removed for a period of time (e.g. 2-4 weeks). Then we'll reinstall it and measure again to see what the impact is.

Thoughts?

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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16 Mar 2004 - 3:43pm
vutpakdi
2003

Seems like something that provides too much information might be a little
too intrusive or at least spark fears that the system hides some nefarious
functionality so that the boss can check to see if someone is there and
working (as opposed to not there or there and playing Doom).

If you just want to give people the idea that someone is there (or people
are there), how about something akin to those orb things that change color
and intensity based on some scale (for example, temperature, barometer, or
stock market trend)? Say blue is "no one is here but lonely me," cyan
means "okay, someone else is here," and red is "everyone is here." Maybe
include a counter (for the number of people). The orbs could even have a
little motion detector rather than a camera to detect whether or not
someone is present to avoid the intrusiveness factor.

A software version of that might just be something that detects mouse
movement and is a very small window with a colored circle and a number
underneath it.

Ron

=====
============================================================================
Ron Vutpakdi
vutpakdi at acm.org

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16 Mar 2004 - 5:13pm
lizz milota
2004

Wow this is a great topic. I've been trying to figure out a way to do some sort of people detection for myself and my two housemates for a while.

The problem is that we all have very different schedules and we never know who is home especially when somebody is asleep or in their room with the door shut. This makes it hard to figure out how to set the alarm system--stay mode or away mode.

I was thinking about getting one of those ambient orbs that were mentioned earlier (http://www.ambientdevices.com) and forcing everybody to set the state of it when they were arriving home or leaving. Each person would be represented by a primary color. So for example if it was glowing orange it would mean that the person represented by red and the person represented by yellow were both home.

Another way (perhaps a little big brotherish) would be to attach radio tags to everyone's keychains (we usually have our keys with us when we come or go.)

Anyway, it may seem easier to just knock on somebody's door to check if they are there but that gets to be a pain after a while...plus I like obsessing on little problems like this :)

lizz

Andrei Sedelnikov <andrei.sedelnikov at web.de> wrote:
Hi Todd,

I found your idea really great! I'm sure people need this.
I would only have a comment concerning the awareness indicator itself:
it seems to me that some kind of video is still intrusive enough.
This is really a good case to use "ambient indicators". There were once
a web site which presented a different kind of ambient devices - i.e.
a sphere changing its color as the stake values are changing
(I don't know the exact URL unfortunately).

In your case there can be two kind of indicators.

a) overall presence - showing the presence of all people in the office.
it could look like a glass ball with light points inside - one point pro
one employee.
b) personal presence - if I would like to monitor the presence
of my collegue Jim, I would take a small ball with his name on it
and place it on my table somewhere. If Jim is suddenly gone,
his ball will not glow any more.

Of course this method requires another kind of presence detection
device, that may cause troubles.

Regards,
Andrei Sedelnikov
http://usabilist.de
----- Original Message -----
From: Todd R.Warfel
To: experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
Cc: Interaction Designers
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:54 PM
Subject: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Okay, I'm working on an experimental project and am looking for ideas for evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't feel like I've found that major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some ideas and inspirations.

Here's a little background (email me off-list if you need more):

The system will be installed in the workplace. The goal of the system is to create awareness w/in cubeville (fatfarms, dilbertville - take your pick). There will be two participants. The participants' workspaces will be "monitored" via a combination of sensors (primary being video). Each participant will be able to view the other's space - kind of. There will be some methods used to distort the information stream so that privacy is still maintained. Again, the goal is awareness. We're not really focusing on measuring emotion.

This will not be a CMC system. Communication will take place outside of the system for the most part with the exception of the system communicating awareness.

I've done some preliminary research into CMC evaluation, effective computing evaluation, and situational awareness evaluation.

A few high-level questions we want to answer:
• Is it meaningful?
• Does it have an impact on the awareness (moreso than w/o the system)?
• How many levels are appropriate for communicating awareness (e.g. here; here, but busy; not here)?
• Is the system tunable enough to provide meaning (users will be able to "tune" the display and tweak it's output)?
• Does it have an impact on the relationship? What kind?
• Does the system make you feel obligated to interact with the person (e.g. the display communicates that they're there, but maybe sad, so you feel obligated to take them to lunch)?

We're going to do some baseline measurements to gather info on current interaction and awareness. We have some ideas for this, but any input you could provide would be useful and appreciated. Also, we'd like to take measurements during intervals of the installation (e.g. bi-weekly) and once the system is removed for a period of time (e.g. 2-4 weeks). Then we'll reinstall it and measure again to see what the impact is.

Thoughts?

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

---------------------------------

_______________________________________________
Interaction Design Discussion List
discuss at interactiondesigners.com
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16 Mar 2004 - 5:22pm
Dave Malouf
2005

But if I was going to do that, wouldn't I just use teh already existing
alarm sensors in the house to detect presence and then have it intelligently
know how to set itself?

The idea of a radio tag is interesting. I've thought of this idea for people
who tend to forget things. That a radio tag is in their shoes. If the shoe
w/ the tag leaves the apt and an important item like keys is not in
proximity to that radio tag & sensor then an alarm goes off.

But back to presence awareness. I think this is an interesting problem.
As for the sensing device ... laser technology is the least obtrusive and
most accurate.

As for state of presence ... is state really that important? Can this be
coordinated in use w/ IM presence software? Meaning, I'm away or present
based on my presense in my cube and I have added options for away and
present in the software that can be engaged and then also an auto idle?

As for what to do w/ the presence awareness ... now that I'm aware, now
what?
1. I know who I can call. Like I hate calling people when they are not at
their desk. I'd much rather just send an e-mail.
2. I know who's cube I can go to ... I hate calling to check (b/c I hate
calling).
3. I know I'm not alone, or I am alone (useful, but not enough to sell a
tool, no?)

Anyway, those are my thoughts.

-- dave

_____

From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of lizz milota
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:14 PM
To: Andrei Sedelnikov; experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com; Todd R.Warfel
Cc: Interaction Designers
Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Wow this is a great topic. I've been trying to figure out a way to do some
sort of people detection for myself and my two housemates for a while.

The problem is that we all have very different schedules and we never know
who is home especially when somebody is asleep or in their room with the
door shut. This makes it hard to figure out how to set the alarm
system--stay mode or away mode.

I was thinking about getting one of those ambient orbs that were mentioned
earlier (http://www.ambientdevices.com) and forcing everybody to set the
state of it when they were arriving home or leaving. Each person would be
represented by a primary color. So for example if it was glowing orange it
would mean that the person represented by red and the person represented by
yellow were both home.

Another way (perhaps a little big brotherish) would be to attach radio tags
to everyone's keychains (we usually have our keys with us when we come or
go.)

Anyway, it may seem easier to just knock on somebody's door to check if they
are there but that gets to be a pain after a while...plus I like obsessing
on little problems like this :)

lizz

Andrei Sedelnikov <andrei.sedelnikov at web.de> wrote:

Hi Todd,

I found your idea really great! I'm sure people need this.
I would only have a comment concerning the awareness indicator itself:
it seems to me that some kind of video is still intrusive enough.
This is really a good case to use "ambient indicators". There were once
a web site which presented a different kind of ambient devices - i.e.
a sphere changing its color as the stake values are changing
(I don't know the exact URL unfortunately).

In your case there can be two kind of indicators.

a) overall presence - showing the presence of all people in the office.
it could look like a glass ball with light points inside - one point pro
one employee.
b) personal presence - if I would like to monitor the presence
of my collegue Jim, I would take a small ball with his name on it
and place it on my table somewhere. If Jim is suddenly gone,
his ball will not glow any more.

Of course this method requires another kind of presence detection
device, that may cause troubles.

Regards,
Andrei Sedelnikov
http://usabilist.de <http://usabilist.de/>

----- Original Message -----
From: Todd R.Warfel <mailto:lists at mk27.com>
To: experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
Cc: Interaction Designers <mailto:discuss at interactiondesigners.com>
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:54 PM
Subject: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Okay, I'm working on an experimental project and am looking for ideas for
evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't feel like I've found that
major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some ideas and inspirations.

Here's a little background (email me off-list if you need more):

The system will be installed in the workplace. The goal of the system is to
create awareness w/in cubeville (fatfarms, dilbertville - take your pick).
There will be two participants. The participants' workspaces will be
"monitored" via a combination of sensors (primary being video). Each
participant will be able to view the other's space - kind of. There will be
some methods used to distort the information stream so that privacy is still
maintained. Again, the goal is awareness. We're not really focusing on
measuring emotion.

This will not be a CMC system. Communication will take place outside of the
system for the most part with the exception of the system communicating
awareness.

I've done some preliminary research into CMC evaluation, effective computing
evaluation, and situational awareness evaluation.

A few high-level questions we want to answer:
 Is it meaningful?
 Does it have an impact on the awareness (moreso than w/o the system)?
 How many levels are appropriate for communicating awareness (e.g. here;
here, but busy; not here)?
 Is the system tunable enough to provide meaning (users will be able to
"tune" the display and tweak it's output)?
 Does it have an impact on the relationship? What kind?
 Does the system make you feel obligated to interact with the person (e.g.
the display communicates that they're there, but maybe sad, so you feel
obligated to take them to lunch)?

We're going to do some baseline measurements to gather info on current
interaction and awareness. We have some ideas for this, but any input you
could provide would be u seful and appreciated. Also, we'd like to take
measurements during intervals of the installation (e.g. bi-weekly) and once
the system is removed for a period of time (e.g. 2-4 weeks). Then we'll
reinstall it and measure again to see what the impact is.

Thoughts?

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
User Experience Architect
MessageFirst | making products easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
voice: (607) 339-9640
email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
web: www.messagefirst.com
aim: twarfel at mac.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

_____

_______________________________________________
Interaction Design Discussion List
discuss at interactiondesigners.com
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to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
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--
Questions: lists at interactiondesigners.com
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16 Mar 2004 - 5:35pm
Casey Jones
2004

David Heller wrote:

> As for state of presence ... is state really that important? Can this
> be coordinated in use w/ IM presence software? Meaning, I'm away or
> present based on my presense in my cube and I have added options for
> away and present in the software that can be engaged and then also an
> auto idle?
>  
> As for what to do w/ the presence awareness ... now that I'm aware,
> now what?
> 1. I know who I can call. Like I hate calling people when they are
> not at their desk. I'd much rather just send an e-mail.
> 2. I know who's cube I can go to ... I hate calling to check (b/c I
> hate calling).
> 3. I know I'm not alone, or I am alone (useful, but not enough to sell
> a tool, no?)

I thought this book was a fun, quick read. The highlighted project in
Isaacs' & Walendowski's _Designing from both sides of the screen_
(http://uidesigns.com/) was an awareness system similar to IM
(http://hubbubme.com/).

It might not be the system you're looking for, Todd, but their process
could be helpful to you since it included discussions on the issues of
awareness and avoiding intrusion, although distributed environments
were more of a focus than co-location.

..casey

17 Mar 2004 - 10:23am
CD Evans
2004

Hello,

This is very interesting.. this idea of a useful video chat IM inside
the office!

I've copied this discussion to a classmate of mine, July, who did a
project on this sort of thing during our Masters Course (Design for
Interaction - Westminster University).

She designed a central 'board' where you can get an overview of the
office according to people's tastes, staying late, beer, sandwiches,
music, etc... perhaps she can comment on the thread. She came up with
some pretty cool stuff... July, do you have a link to your project? Or
perhaps you can tell us what you came up with?

(an easy way to cluster people right off the bat would be by the email
lists they are on...)

CD

On 16 Mar 2004, at 22:22, David Heller wrote:

> But if I was going to do that, wouldn't I just use teh already
> existing alarm sensors in the house to detect presence and then have
> it intelligently know how to set itself?
>  
> The idea of a radio tag is interesting. I've thought of this idea for
> people who tend to forget things. That a radio tag is in their shoes.
> If the shoe w/ the tag leaves the apt and an important item like keys
> is not in proximity to that radio tag & sensor then an alarm goes off.
>  
> But back to presence awareness. I think this is an interesting problem.
> As for the sensing device ... laser technology is the least obtrusive
> and most accurate.
>  
> As for state of presence ... is state really that important? Can this
> be coordinated in use w/ IM presence software? Meaning, I'm away or
> present based on my presense in my cube and I have added options for
> away and present in the software that can be engaged and then also an
> auto idle?
>  
> As for what to do w/ the presence awareness ... now that I'm aware,
> now what?
> 1. I know who I can call. Like I hate calling people when they are not
> at their desk. I'd much rather just send an e-mail.
> 2. I know who's cube I can go to ... I hate calling to check (b/c I
> hate calling).
> 3. I know I'm not alone, or I am alone (useful, but not enough to sell
> a tool, no?)
>  
> Anyway, those are my thoughts.
>  
> -- dave
>  
>
>
> From:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-
> bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-
> bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com]On Behalf Of lizz milota
> Sent:Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:14 PM
> To:Andrei Sedelnikov; experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com; Todd R.Warfel
> Cc:Interaction Designers
> Subject:Re: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....
>
> Wow this is a great topic. I've been trying to figure out a way to do
> some sort of people detection for myself and my two housemates for a
> while.
>  
> The problem is that we all have very different schedules and we never
> know who is home especially when somebody is asleep or in their room
> with the door shut. This makes it hard to figure out how to set the
> alarm system--stay mode or away mode.
>  
> I was thinking about getting one of those ambient orbs that were
> mentioned earlier (http://www.ambientdevices.com) and forcing
> everybody to set the state of it when they were arriving home or
> leaving. Each person would be represented by a primary color. So for
> example if it was glowing orange it would mean that the person
> represented by red and the person represented by yellow were both
> home.
>  
> Another way (perhaps a little big brotherish) would be to attach radio
> tags to everyone's keychains (we usually have our keys with us when we
> come or go.)
>  
> Anyway, it may seem easier to just knock on somebody's door to check
> if they are there but that gets to be a pain after a while...plus I
> like obsessing on little problems like this :)
>  
> lizz
>  
>
> Andrei Sedelnikov <andrei.sedelnikov at web.de>wrote:
> Hi Todd,
>  
> I found your idea really great! I'm sure people need this.
> I would only have a comment concerning the awareness indicator itself:
> it seems to me that some kind of video is still intrusive enough.
> This is really a good case to use "ambient indicators". There were once
> a web site which presented a different kind of ambient devices - i.e.
> a sphere changing its color as the stake values are changing
> (I don't know the exact URL unfortunately).
>  
> In your case there can be two kind of indicators.
>  
> a) overall presence - showing the presence of all people in the office.
> it could look like a glass ball with light points inside - one point
> pro
> one employee.
> b) personal presence - if I would like to monitor the presence
> of my collegue Jim, I would take a small ball with his name on it
> and place it on my table somewhere. If Jim is suddenly gone,
> his ball will not glow any more.
>  
> Of course this method requires another kind of presence detection
> device, that may cause troubles.
>  
> Regards,
> Andrei Sedelnikov
> http://usabilist.de
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Todd R.Warfel
> To: experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
> Cc: Interaction Designers
> Sent:Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:54 PM
> Subject:[ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....
>
> Okay, I'm working on an experimental project and am looking for ideas
> for evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't feel like I've
> found that major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some ideas and
> inspirations.
>
> Here's a little background (email me off-list if you need more):
>
> The system will be installed in the workplace. The goal of the system
> is to create awareness w/in cubeville (fatfarms, dilbertville - take
> your pick). There will be two participants. The participants'
> workspaces will be "monitored" via a combination of sensors (primary
> being video). Each participant will be able to view the other's space
> - kind of. There will be some methods used to distort the information
> stream so that privacy is still maintained. Again, the goal is
> awareness. We're not really focusing on measuring emotion.
>
> This will not be a CMC system. Communication will take place outside
> of the system for the most part with the exception of the system
> communicating awareness.
>
> I've done some preliminary research into CMC evaluation, effective
> computing evaluation, and situational awareness evaluation.
>
> A few high-level questions we want to answer:
>  Is it meaningful?
>  Does it have an impact on the awareness (moreso than w/o the system)?
>  How many levels are appropriate for communicating awareness (e.g.
> here; here, but busy; not here)?
>  Is the system tunable enough to provide meaning (users will be able
> to "tune" the display and tweak it's output)?
>  Does it have an impact on the relationship? What kind?
>  Does the system make you feel obligated to interact with the person
> (e.g. the display communicates that they're there, but maybe sad, so
> you feel obligated to take them to lunch)?
>
> We're going to do some baseline measurements to gather info on current
> interaction and awareness. We have some ideas for this, but any input
> you could provide would be u seful and appreciated. Also, we'd like to
> take measurements during intervals of the installation (e.g.
> bi-weekly) and once the system is removed for a period of time (e.g.
> 2-4 weeks). Then we'll reinstall it and measure again to see what the
> impact is.
>
> Thoughts?
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd R. Warfel
> User Experience Architect
> MessageFirst | making products easier to use
> --------------------------------------
> Contact Info
> voice: (607) 339-9640
> email: twarfel at messagefirst.com
> web: www.messagefirst.com
> aim: twarfel at mac.com
> --------------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
> _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at interactiondesigners.com
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18 Mar 2004 - 10:54pm
John O'Donovan
2004

Todd - copied in my previous reply elsewhere in case people are interested
in the referenced project (Connexus).

Also had another thought for this along the lines of a digital patina
representing your office space, groups or other relevant method. What's a
patina? Well the definition I would be interested in is:

"A change in appearance produced by long-standing behaviour, practice, or
use: a face etched with a patina of fine lines and tiny wrinkles"

So maybe there is both a current and historical element to this. Perhaps
some groups, more likely to be around early / late might trace patterns that
remain over time - or become burnt into the background, so that there is a
now and a previous set of behaviour showing.

BBCi homepage used a digital patina:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2002/11_november/20/b
bci_newlook.shtml

Another analogy is that of the office lights. We have lights that
automatically turn off if no-one is moving around. The pattern of lights in
the building shows who is in - unless they have fallen asleep at their desk.
Not uncommon in my office...but I digress. A representation of the pattern
of lights, representing the pattern of people might make an interesting
anthropological map of behaviour. Another angle leads to the opposite, where
the patterns of lights in the building could represent events...

http://www.blinkenlights.de/arcade/games.en.html

[previous reply elsewhere...]

I think the desire to link emotionally will be hard to avoid. Though it does
depend on what you are showing and how avoidable the medium is.

A colleague recently made an observation that on observing teams that worked
together remotely, they had developed what would have appeared to be
aggressive communication of emotional state to an outsider. However, this
appeared to create a world of more honest communication - the enforced
geographical divide meant staff were trying to sensitize the communication
process as much as possible through supplementary means. To stop them from
flaming each other to death no doubt...

An interesting sensory awareness idea that was shown at DUX was the Connexus
project:

<http://berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/>
http://berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/

Sending nothing other than simple sad, happy, or "I'm here/OK" messages.
This is more of en extreme example, but rather than direct communication it
seems you are looking to promote more this kind of awareness?

Another angle is similar to the IM angle - even without directly
communicating, is it reassuring to know that your buddies are also online?
That you are not alone in the office on a dark, cold and wet evening?

Cheers,

jod

_____

From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Todd R.Warfel
Sent: 16 March 2004 16:55
To: experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
Cc: Interaction Designers
Subject: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Okay, I'm working on an experimental project and am looking for ideas for
evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't feel like I've found that
major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some ideas and inspirations.

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19 Mar 2004 - 7:53am
CD Evans
2004

July has asked me to forward her work on the Working Space project.

I've put her original attachment online. I highly recommend downloading
this project concept paper:

http://www.infostyling.com/July/WorkingSpace-ReserchConcepts.pdf (131
kb)

Enjoy it. Her email is below.

Thanks
CD Evans

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Juliana Ferreira" <julyferreira at hotmail.com>
Date: 18 March 2004 12:09:08 GMT
To: clifton at infostyling.com, dave at interactiondesigners.com
Cc: lists at mk27.com, discuss at interactiondesigners.com,
lizz_fizz at yahoo.com, andrei.sedelnikov at web.de,
experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Hi Everyone,

First of all I apologise for the delay on replying. As Clifton asked me
here it goes the information about my project.

As I don't have a better way of showing it, I just placed a folder in
my website so u guys can link to the presentation. As it has been built
just for the final presentation at the University the navigation is not
intuitive at all, I am sorry for that. So I am sending a guide of how u
can go on the sequence. This is the fastest way of sending it to you
all. Here it goes:

First go to the link:

http://www.julianaferreira.com/working_space

Then this is the sequence:

01. allow the sound feature(its important to have a sound input like a
microphone)

02. click in the computer screen

03. click in my status

04. click in close

05. mouse over the little head of the red hair girl in the bottom in
the direction of my status

06. click in the 7th blond head from left to right

07. click in work

08. click in the x to close

09. click in the check box of project search in the top and then in the
red button arrow to continue

10. Go to the bottom in the search within results check box project and
click the red bt arrow to continue

11. Go to the bottom in the search within results check box people and
click the red bt arrow to continue

12. Click in the arrow to continue

13. Click in the ceeling

14. Click in the ceeling to go back

15. Click in the screen

16. Click in the screen to go back

17. Click in the large profile in the front to continue

18. Click in the screen

19. Click in the screen to go back

Together with this email I am sending a pdf file with the project
concept. This project was an attempt to produce a virtual and phisical
system which the intention was to promote peoples awarness of their
interaction in their working environment and within the other people
arround them. Most of all was a study about privacy and its many
levels, and my intention was to try to give them a view of someone
looking from outside but being inside.

I hope u all like it, and please do send me comments, critiques and
ideas.

Thanks a lot

July

Juliana Ferreira

Interaction & Visual Designer

+44 78 7969 0961

www.julianaferreira.com
> >From: CD Evans >To: David Heller, Juliana Ferreira>CC: "'Todd
> R.Warfel'" , "'Interaction Designers'" , "'lizz milota'", "'Andrei
> Sedelnikov'", >Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....
> >Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 15:23:34 +0000 > > >Hello, > >This is very
> interesting.. this idea of a useful video chat IM >inside the office!
> > >I've copied this discussion to a classmate of mine, July, who did a
> >project on this sort of thing during our Masters Course (Design for
> >Interaction - Westminster University). > >She designed a central
> 'board' where you can get an overview of the >office according to
> people's tastes, staying late, beer, sandwiches, > music, etc...
> perhaps she can comment on the thread. She came up >with some pretty
> cool stuff... July, do you have a link to your >project? Or perhaps
> you can tell us what you came up with? > >(an easy way to cluster
> people right off the bat would be by the >email lists they are on...)
> > >CD > >On 16 Mar 2004, at 22:22, David Heller wrote: > >>But if I
> was going to do that, wouldn't I just use teh already >>existing alarm
> sensors in the house to detect presence and then >>have it
> intelligently know how to set itself? >>  >>The idea of a radio tag is
> interesting. I've thought of this idea >>for people who tend to forget
> things. That a radio tag is in their >>shoes. If the shoe w/ the tag
> leaves the apt and an important item >>like keys is not in proximity
> to that radio tag & sensor then an >>alarm goes off. >>  >>But back to
> presence awareness. I think this is an interesting >>problem. >>As for
> the sensing device ... laser technology is the least >>obtrusive and
> most accurate. >>  >>As for state of presence ... is state really that
> important? Can >>this be coordinated in use w/ IM presence software?
> Meaning, I'm >>away or present based on my presense in my cube and I
> have added >>options for away and present in the software that can be
> engaged >>and then also an auto idle? >>  >>As for what to do w/ the
> presence awareness ... now that I'm aware, >> now what? >>1. I know
> who I can call. Like I hate calling people when they are >>not at
> their desk. I'd much rather just send an e-mail. >>2. I know who's
> cube I can go to ... I hate calling to check (b/c I >> hate calling).
> >>3. I know I'm not alone, or I am alone (useful, but not enough to
> >>sell a tool, no?) >>  >>Anyway, those are my thoughts. >>  >>-- dave
> >>  >> >> >>From:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-
> >>bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> >>[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-
> >>bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com]On Behalf Of lizz milota
> >>Sent:Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:14 PM >>To:Andrei Sedelnikov;
> experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com; Todd >>R.Warfel >>Cc:Interaction
> Designers >>Subject:Re: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness.... >> >>Wow
> this is a great topic. I've been trying to figure out a way to >>do
> some sort of people detection for myself and my two housemates >>for a
> while. >>  >>The problem is that we all have very different schedules
> and we >>never know who is home especially when somebody is asleep or
> in >>their room with the door shut. This makes it hard to figure out
> >>how to set the alarm system--stay mode or away mode. >>  >>I was
> thinking about getting one of those ambient orbs that were >>mentioned
> earlier (http://www.ambientdevices.com) and forcing >>everybody to set
> the state of it when they were arriving home or >>leaving. Each person
> would be represented by a primary color. >>So for example if it was
> glowing orange it would mean that the >>person represented by red and
> the person represented by yellow >>were both home. >>  >>Another way
> (perhaps a little big brotherish) would be to attach >>radio tags to
> everyone's keychains (we usually have our keys with >>us when we come
> or go.) >>  >>Anyway, it may seem easier to just knock on somebody's
> door to >>check if they are there but that gets to be a pain after a
> >>while...plus I like obsessing on little problems like this :) >> 
> >>lizz >>  >> >>Andrei Sedelnikovwrote: >>Hi Todd, >>  >>I found your
> idea really great! I'm sure people need this. >>I would only have a
> comment concerning the awareness indicator >>itself: >>it seems to me
> that some kind of video is still intrusive enough. >>This is really a
> good case to use "ambient indicators". There were >>once >>a web site
> which presented a different kind of ambient devices - >>i.e. >>a
> sphere changing its color as the stake values are changing >>(I don't
> know the exact URL unfortunately). >>  >>In your case there can be two
> kind of indicators. >>  >>a) overall presence - showing the presence
> of all people in the >>office. >>it could look like a glass ball with
> light points inside - one >>point pro >>one employee. >>b) personal
> presence - if I would like to monitor the presence >>of my collegue
> Jim, I would take a small ball with his name on it >>and place it on
> my table somewhere. If Jim is suddenly gone, >>his ball will not glow
> any more. >>  >>Of course this method requires another kind of
> presence detection >>device, that may cause troubles. >>  >>Regards,
> >>Andrei Sedelnikov >>http://usabilist.de >>----- Original Message
> ----- >>From: Todd R.Warfel >>To: experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
> >>Cc: Interaction Designers >>Sent:Tuesday, March 16, 2004 5:54 PM
> >>Subject:[ID Discuss] Measuring awareness.... >> >>Okay, I'm working
> on an experimental project and am looking for >>ideas for evaluation.
> I have a couple already, but don't feel like >>I've found that major
> breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some >>ideas and inspirations.
> >> >>Here's a little background (email me off-list if you need more):
> >> >>The system will be installed in the workplace. The goal of the
> >>system is to create awareness w/in cubeville (fatfarms,
> >>dilbertville - take your pick). There will be two participants.
> >>The participants' workspaces will be "monitored" via a combination
> >>of sensors (primary being video). Each participant will be able to
> >>view the other's space - kind of. There will be some methods used
> >>to distort the information stream so that privacy is still
> >>maintained. Again, the goal is awareness. We're not really
> >>focusing on measuring emotion. >> >>This will not be a CMC system.
> Communication will take place >>outside of the system for the most
> part with the exception of the >>system communicating awareness. >>
> >>I've done some preliminary research into CMC evaluation, effective
> >>computing evaluation, and situational awareness evaluation. >> >>A
> few high-level questions we want to answer: >> Is it meaningful? >>
> Does it have an impact on the awareness (moreso than w/o the
> >>system)? >> How many levels are appropriate for communicating
> awareness (e.g. >> here; here, but busy; not here)? >> Is the system
> tunable enough to provide meaning (users will be >>able to "tune" the
> display and tweak it's output)? >> Does it have an impact on the
> relationship? What kind? >> Does the system make you feel obligated
> to interact with the >>person (e.g. the display communicates that
> they're there, but >>maybe sad, so you feel obligated to take them to
> lunch)? >> >>We're going to do some baseline measurements to gather
> info on >>current interaction and awareness. We have some ideas for
> this, >>but any input you could provide would be u seful and
> appreciated. >>Also, we'd like to take measurements during intervals
> of the >>installation (e.g. bi-weekly) and once the system is removed
> for a >>period of time (e.g. 2-4 weeks). Then we'll reinstall it and
> >>measure again to see what the impact is. >> >>Thoughts? >> >>Cheers!
> >> >>Todd R. Warfel >>User Experience Architect >>MessageFirst |
> making products easier to use >>--------------------------------------
> >>Contact Info >>voice: (607) 339-9640 >>email:
> twarfel at messagefirst.com >>web: www.messagefirst.com >>aim:
> twarfel at mac.com >>-------------------------------------- >>In theory,
> theory and practice are the same. >>In practice, they are not. >>
> >>_______________________________________________ >>Interaction Design
> Discussion List >>discuss at interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>to change
> your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> >>http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>Questions:
> lists at interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>Announcement Online List
> (discussion list members get announcements >> already)
> >>http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/ >>--
> >>http://interactiondesigners.com/
> >>_______________________________________________ >>Interaction Design
> Discussion List >>discuss at interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>to change
> your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> >>http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>Questions:
> lists at interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>Announcement Online List
> (discussion list members get announcements >> already)
> >>http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/ >>--
> >>http://interactiondesigners.com/ >> >>Do you Yahoo!? >>Yahoo! Mail -
> More reliable, more storage, less spam
> >>_______________________________________________ >>Interaction Design
> Discussion List >>discuss at interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>to change
> your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> >>http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>Questions:
> lists at interactiondesigners.com >>-- >>Announcement Online List
> (discussion list members get announcements >> already)
> >>http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/ >>--
> >>http://interactiondesigners.com/ >
>
> MSN Messenger: converse com os seus amigos online.Instale grátis.
> Clique aqui.

19 Mar 2004 - 8:38am
Priya Prakash
2004

Also Matt Webb's project on 'glancing I'm Ok your're OK' which he presented at ETCON 2004.
You can find the presentation at http://glancing.interconnected.org/2004/02/etcon/?s=1
Recommend you have a look
John-
The blinken light thing is amazing. Did you actually try it out?
P

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com]On Behalf Of John O'Donovan
Sent: 19 March 2004 03:55
To: 'Todd R.Warfel'; experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
Cc: 'Interaction Designers'
Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Todd - copied in my previous reply elsewhere in case people are interested in the referenced project (Connexus).

Also had another thought for this along the lines of a digital patina representing your office space, groups or other relevant method. What's a patina? Well the definition I would be interested in is:

"A change in appearance produced by long-standing behaviour, practice, or use: a face etched with a patina of fine lines and tiny wrinkles"

So maybe there is both a current and historical element to this. Perhaps some groups, more likely to be around early / late might trace patterns that remain over time - or become burnt into the background, so that there is a now and a previous set of behaviour showing.

BBCi homepage used a digital patina:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2002/11_november/20/bbci_newlook.shtml

Another analogy is that of the office lights. We have lights that automatically turn off if no-one is moving around. The pattern of lights in the building shows who is in - unless they have fallen asleep at their desk. Not uncommon in my office...but I digress. A representation of the pattern of lights, representing the pattern of people might make an interesting anthropological map of behaviour. Another angle leads to the opposite, where the patterns of lights in the building could represent events...

http://www.blinkenlights.de/arcade/games.en.html

[previous reply elsewhere...]

I think the desire to link emotionally will be hard to avoid. Though it does depend on what you are showing and how avoidable the medium is.

A colleague recently made an observation that on observing teams that worked together remotely, they had developed what would have appeared to be aggressive communication of emotional state to an outsider. However, this appeared to create a world of more honest communication - the enforced geographical divide meant staff were trying to sensitize the communication process as much as possible through supplementary means. To stop them from flaming each other to death no doubt...

An interesting sensory awareness idea that was shown at DUX was the Connexus project:

<http://berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/> http://berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/

Sending nothing other than simple sad, happy, or "I'm here/OK" messages. This is more of en extreme example, but rather than direct communication it seems you are looking to promote more this kind of awareness?

Another angle is similar to the IM angle - even without directly communicating, is it reassuring to know that your buddies are also online? That you are not alone in the office on a dark, cold and wet evening?

Cheers,

jod

_____

From: discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Todd R.Warfel
Sent: 16 March 2004 16:55
To: experiencedesign at yahoogroups.com
Cc: Interaction Designers
Subject: [ID Discuss] Measuring awareness....

Okay, I'm working on an experimental project and am looking for ideas for evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't feel like I've found that major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for some ideas and inspirations.

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21 Mar 2004 - 11:47am
John O'Donovan
2004

I'd love to try it out Priya, but have not done so. The thought connects in
terms of patterns of lights and people in the office, especially after you
sit in our White City offices late at night. As people leave the automatic
lights turn out. If you are a late worker like me, soon you find yours is
the only light on as far as you can see.

If you don't move very much, as you do when typing or reading emails, then
your light goes out as well and your left in total darkness, waving your
arms in the air to get it to turn back on again.

Also you can watch the "people tracers" that fire off as people walk down
corridors or through the office late at night and the lights come on
automatically, following their path.

Cheers,

jod

-----Original Message-----
From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Priya Prakash

Also Matt Webb's project on 'glancing I'm Ok your're OK' which he presented
at ETCON 2004.
You can find the presentation at
http://glancing.interconnected.org/2004/02/etcon/?s=1
Recommend you have a look
John-
The blinken light thing is amazing. Did you actually try it out?
P

22 Mar 2004 - 3:40pm
ben hyde
2004

Todd, (and others - excuse cross posting, am simply
replying to all *duck*)

Reading your post, I was going to mention Glancing -
which seems to fit the bill - but someone beat me to
it ;( I have to say it seems like a great idea/tool!
Personally, I would love to see it in action...

Anyway, if you are interested in the peripheral
approach you might want to check out a recent GUIR
paper which has been accepted to CHI - which i guess
may also shed some light (sic) on what might be done
on the screen?:

Exploring the Design and Use of Peripheral Displays of
Awareness Information
"We present the design of physically-based peripheral
displays that convey awareness information to remote
users. We describe the results of a focus group that
was conducted to better understand the concept of
awareness and describe four different physical,
aesthetic displays of awareness information."
[http://guir.berkeley.edu/pubs/chi2004/tim_short.pdf
PDF]

There is a lot more on their:
Ambient Displays Research Group page
[http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/projects/io/ambient/]

And of course, Saul and the grouplab folks have done
loads on this area...

cheers,
ben

p.s. interested to see what you discover - once you
implement

--- "Todd R.Warfel" <lists at mk27.com> wrote: > Okay,
I'm working on an experimental project and am
> looking for ideas
> for evaluation. I have a couple already, but don't
> feel like I've found
> that major breakthrough yet. So, I'm looking for
> some ideas and
> inspirations.
>
> Here's a little background (email me off-list if you
> need more):
>
> The system will be installed in the workplace. The
> goal of the system
> is to create awareness w/in cubeville (fatfarms,
> dilbertville - take
> your pick). There will be two participants. The
> participants'
> workspaces will be "monitored" via a combination of
> sensors (primary
> being video). Each participant will be able to view
> the other's space -
> kind of. There will be some methods used to distort
> the information
> stream so that privacy is still maintained. Again,
> the goal is
> awareness. We're not really focusing on measuring
> emotion.
>
> This will not be a CMC system. Communication will
> take place outside of
> the system for the most part with the exception of
> the system
> communicating awareness.
>
> I've done some preliminary research into CMC
> evaluation, effective
> computing evaluation, and situational awareness
> evaluation.
>
> A few high-level questions we want to answer:
> • Is it meaningful?
> • Does it have an impact on the awareness (moreso
> than w/o the system)?
> • How many levels are appropriate for communicating
> awareness (e.g.
> here; here, but busy; not here)?
> • Is the system tunable enough to provide meaning
> (users will be able
> to "tune" the display and tweak it's output)?
> • Does it have an impact on the relationship? What
> kind?
> • Does the system make you feel obligated to
> interact with the person
> (e.g. the display communicates that they're there,
> but maybe sad, so
> you feel obligated to take them to lunch)?
>

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